The Article Writing Course 2015: Why Bother Reading This Prospectus?


How do you benchmark a course?
Do you benchmark it based on one superstar?
Or do you benchmark it based on the fact that everyone gets to the other side successfully?

When you read the prospectus, you’ll find out for yourself.
You don’t have to read 70+ pages of testimonials to find out that from the year 2006, clients have gone from utter struggle and frustration, to becoming stunning writers.

Part of the stunning results comes from the sheer determination
Part of it comes from the structure of the course–and the philosophy of “tiny increments” instead of an information overload. And the fact that I’m there every day, several times a day, critiquing, working with you–making tiny adjustments.

So read the Article Writing Course prospectus, because it shows you how the Psychotactics “tiny increments” system gets results for everyone–not just one superstar.

How do you benchmark a course?
Let the detailed experiences of the alumni tell you the story.
Have a look at the prospectus and judge for yourself.
http://tinyurl.com/prospectus2015

Warm regards,
s-
P.S. We don’t accept more than 25 on the course. It’s intense. It’s tough.
We open registration on Saturday 8th Nov, at 3 pm Eastern (US).
The course fills up incredibly quickly (often in matter of hours).

Make sure you put at least a couple of alarms so you don’t miss out.
Here is the sales page with all the details about the course.
http://www.psychotactics.com/article-writing-course-how-to-write-articles/


Why We Struggle To Write Articles: The Myth Of Unique Content

Struggle Writing Articles

Have you heard the song “New York, New York”?

It’s a song made popular by Elvis Presley, right?

Of course not. You probably heard the Frank Sinatra version of it. But what if Elvis sang the same song? Or maybe Lady Gaga? Would the audience avoid listening to the song, just because it has the very same lyrics?

That’s not the case at all. In fact, every hit (or even some obscure songs) are covered by other artists and are extremely well-received. In effect there’s nothing unique about the lyrics at all, just the way it’s presented.

Which gets interesting when you’re writing an article about dog food

As you scroll through seventeen million seven hundred and twenty one articles on dog food, you may not feel inspired to put one more article into the mix. And you’d be wrong. Because when you write an article, it’s a lot like an artist singing a song. What matters isn’t the content, but how that content is presented.

This, of course, doesn’t give you the license to copy everything in sight

But it should give you the confidence that your audience is keen to listen to your own voice. The way you string your words, your own quirky sense (or lack of) humour. All these little things that make the article different, is what the audience is desperate to hear.

In many cases, you’ll be writing about something that’s not so very unique. In other cases, your content may well be unique. And there will be times when you feel your work is unique, only to find that it’s been covered before.

And yet, there it is

No cartoonist sets out to copy another cartoonist when doing a political cartoon. An article can get buried somewhere in a newspaper, but a cartoon—and especially a political cartoon stands out like crazy. And so you strive to be very original.

And yet, there it is

Your idea has been replicated by someone else. That cartoonist didn’t set out to copy you and you didn’t set out to copy the other, but you still ended up with something remarkably similar. But what’s interesting is that both your audiences loved your work. And even if the work happened to be printed side by side in the very same newspaper, they would still love it.

In fact the song “New York, New York” (correctly known as “Theme from New York, New York” has been covered by dozens of artists, including Sammy Davis Junior, José_José, Lee Towers, Jeff Bridges, Queen, The Three Tenors, Beyoncé, Michael Bublé—and even by Alex the Lion in the cartoon feature film “Madagascar”.

You’re getting the point, aren’t you?

It’s not what you say, it’s how you say it that counts.

Now go and write that article, because you do have something to say. And your audience wants to hear it.


Next Step: Links you should visit

1) Are you interested in taking your online business to the next level? Then you must have a look at 5000bc.

2)  Do you feel like banging your head against the wall when writing content for the important pages on your website?
Introducing: How to write compelling content for your key web pages. 


Top Selling Products Under $50

Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done

New! Critical Website Components: How to write compelling content for your key web pages
Free! Excerpt of The Brain Audit: Why Clients Buy And Why They Don’t 



Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room-without turning anyone off?

Online Membership Website: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


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Writing Salesletters or Articles? How to Ditch The “Tired” Analogy

Writing Salesletters or Articles? How to Ditch The "Tired" Analogy

I remember how I always groaned when my father started to tell his story of “how he drew a kingfisher”, when he was just a boy in school.

I loved the story, but I’d heard it so many times, that the thought of escape always crossed my mind when he’d start up that story. The reader experiences a similar “groan moment” the minute you start up on an analogy that they’ve heard before.

Analogies like how you learn to ride a bicycle, drive a car—these are tired analogies

These analogies are boring for the reader, no matter if you use it in a sales letter or in your article. So how you decide when to ditch the analogy? Or better still, how do you improve it so it’s not so “tired” after all?

Let’s take an example

In the book, The Brain Audit, there’s an analogy of standing near the airport carousel waiting for your bags to be unloaded from the flight. So what’s interesting about that situation? Well, for one it’s not something that you hear about a lot. It doesn’t have that ring of “when you learned to ride a bicycle”. And so, by merely changing the example, your analogy becomes slightly more interesting.

But what if we wanted to make it even more interesting?

This is where the power of the personal story comes in. Imagine yourself waiting for the bag. What happens? What happens next? What ups and downs do you go through just waiting for those silly ol’ bags? In The Brain Audit, the bags aren’t just bags—they’re “red” bags.

And there aren’t just “red” bags, but there are “seven red bags”. And the story rolls out where one of the bags goes missing. As you can tell, this isn’t just some tired analogy, but something that’s slightly riveting. You want to know what happens next. You want to know how all of this then reconnects to the story.

So the key to writing better analogies is to write a personal story first

Put yourself at the airport. What did you do? What happened next? And next? And yes, I know I said this already in the last paragraph, but can we have some ups and downs as well as you’re relating the analogy? In fact, the moment you dip into a personal story, even a tired story of riding a bicycle comes to life.

About the best way to sidestep a boring analogy is to use a personal story. In fact, let’s take an example of a personal story.

Only an idiot would learn to cycle like me.

Most people find the safest, flattest area to learn how to cycle. Not me. I decided to learn on slopes filled with red mud. Everytime I fell—and I fell a lot—the mud would graze me badly. And of course, learning on a slope means you’re tempting gravity all the time.

Yet, long after the wounds have healed, the learning of how to ride the bike has stayed with me.

But what if you don’t want to tell personal stories?

Well, turn the personal story into a “YOU” analogy instead. Tell the personal story but without using “I”. So the story would work like this:

Why would anyone be insane enough to find the most difficult cycling course?

Most people find the safest, flattest area to learn how to cycle. But imagine you decided to learn on slopes filled with red mud. Everytime you fell—and you do fall a lot—the mud would graze you badly. And of course, learning on a slope means you’re tempting gravity all the time.

Yet, long after the wounds have healed, the learning of how to ride the bike has stayed with you.

Notice how the analogy isn’t tired, isn’t personal and still seems like an amazing analogy?

If you’re ever reaching for a tired analogy, the first recourse would be to simply find something that’s unusual—like the “seven red bags” story. However, an even better strategy is to write a personal story because personal stories have this inbuilt oomph factor. Should you feel shy about revealing the personal story to your audience, all you have to do is simply tweak it a bit. Put in the “you” into the story and you have a great analogy.

Analogies can be used not just in articles, but also in books, presentations and sales letters

Some of the best writers and marketers know the power of the story and analogy. And they use it very effectively to drive home several points throughout their marketing or editorial material. And they mix it up a lot with analogies and stories, while the amateurs simply write yucky, boring stuff.

Tired analogies are for lazy writers.

Be not sloppy. Be not boring.

Put in the power of story in your analogy and let the “groan” go away, today!


“My biggest hesitation in joining 5000bc was trusting it’d really be a safe place to make mistakes, while still getting support. “

5000bc Membership

Your Be helpful, Be kind, or Begone messaging really helped with. I found that my membership has already paid for itself 4-5x over already.

What blows my mind is Sean’s interaction and support. 
He took me through finding the uniqueness of a new venture. He could have easily charged me $625 (his hourly consulting fee). But he didn’t, he just gave guidance and allowed others to learn from my experience.

The one thing I like most is no-BS feedback from people. The people really want to help you succeed and they receive your feedback with gratitude. It’s really beautiful.

3 other benefits would be
1. Vanishing reports
2. Audio interviews
3. Seeing the “behind the scenes” of Sean’s products and sales pages

I would definitely recommend 5000bc. Why?
Because it’s perfect support for any question you can have about marketing you are working on implementing.

John Reisinger
Tacoma, WA, USA

Judge for yourself and get on the waiting list.


Top Selling Products Under $50


Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
 Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done

Critical Website ComponentsHow to write compelling content for your key web pages

The Brain Audit has been around for many years and has over 800 testimonials. It is  a complete system that enables you to understand what’s going on inside the brain of your customer.
Not read about The Brain Audit as yet? Find out more here.


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) Online Membership Website: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 


How To Avoid Dragging Out A Well Known Story (And Boring The Reader)

How To Avoid Dragging Out A Well Known Story (And Boring The Reader)

You know that story your mum used to tell? Every time she’d start recounting it, you’d groan. You had heard that story ten squillion times before and your mum just ignored you and told it anyway.

You may forgive mum, after all she’s just dear ol’ mum, but your readers won’t always be as kind. If you bore them, they’ll just move on.

So how do we bore readers with our story?

We do this by unfolding a sequence or story that’s extremely familiar. It’s so familiar that as the reader is about 30-40 words into the sequence, they already know what you’re going to say for the next 100-200 words or so.

Let’s take an example or two

Let’s say you’re writing about Goldilocks and the three bars.

Now, the sequence is unknown. (Yes, that was bars, not bears). But if you talk about Goldilocks and three bears and drag out the sequence, it gets tedious, because I already know what you’re saying.

So you shorten it like this…

We know about Goldilocks, don’t we? And those three bears? And how she broke in sat on their chairs, ate their porridge and then slept in their beds?

And then you go on to the rest of the article

When you tighten that sequence, you respect the intelligence of the reader, but still bring in the story to jog their memory. And of course the story is integral to your article, so you can’t leave it out. So your job is to keep the sequence tight and taut.

Let’s take another example: a story about retirement

The downslide of retirement is quite a familiar territory. It goes like this: The person retires: They’re excited; Then they get bored.

That retirement sequence was literally three lines. And you can get to the point awfully quickly if the story or sequence is known. But you don’t always have to be so curt. You do have a little more leeway than three lines.

Your opening could be: Retirement is a sickeningly familiar story, isn’t it? Everyone works like crazy, longs for retirement and then it happens. We get bored and disillusioned. But what do you do once this disillusionment sets in?

And then you go to the rest of your article

Which of course makes the reader very happy. But more importantly it saves you about half an hour of slaving over an opening that is going to put the reader off, instead of helping them move through the rest of the article.

Keep the sequence tight

Keep it taut.

And yes, smile when mum starts up her story yet again.


“I have a business and attracting new customers require a continuous effort. I am always searching for ways to take my business to the next level.”

 Story Telling Series: Psychotactics

The Story Telling Mini Series gave me the road map for my web-site.
Demet Kitis, Canada
Judge for yourself: Story Telling Mini Series


NEW! The Brain Audit: Why Clients Buy And Why They Don’t (Available in Different Formats)


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
2) Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

3) Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
4) Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

5) Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
6) Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
7) Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done

8) Critical Website ComponentsHow to write compelling content for your key web pages


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) Online Membership Website: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 

 


How To Audit Your Benefits and Features For Singleminded Impact

How To Audit Your Benefits and Features For Singleminded Impact

In 333BC, Darius, the ruler of Persia was sure of his victory on the battlefield.

After all, his soldiers outnumbered Alexander the Great’s army by 2:1. And yet, Alexander used an unusual ploy. Instead of the usual strategy of both armies battling it out, he decided to just go after Darius. That single-minded command caused Darius to be outflanked and forced to flee.

That single-mindedness is something that every copywriter needs to focus on, when writing benefits and features. And the reason why you need to focus is because it’s very easy to go off track when writing a three-four lines on a specific feature/benefit.

Let’s take an example from the sales page of this book called “Client Attractors”

One the sales page we see features/benefits that read like this…

1) Big Brand Mistakes

Big brands make the same mistakes that small businesses do. In their hurry to create a sales page, they leave out critical information in their features and benefits. Learn how to avoid the mistakes—especially if you’re a small business owner.

2) Powerful Graphics

Many writers pooh-pooh graphics, but did you know that some of the biggest and most successful brands online use graphics to consistently drive home benefits and features. But how do you use these graphics correctly?

3) Benefits With A Secret Weapon

It’s clear as day once you know the secret, but some benefits are far more potent than others. The secret lies in how you insert a ‘problem’. The ‘problem’ creates drama and makes a run-of-the-mill benefit stand out. Once you know how to use the ‘problem’ in benefits, you’ll want to use it all the time.

So what three points did you get from those benefits/bullets?

The first one was specifically “big brand mistakes”. The second was just about “graphics and how to use them” and the third was the “unleashing the secret power of the problem”. In short, the benefits/features started out with one point and drove home that one point, without getting distracted.

But even so, it’s easy to get distracted when writing a few lines of the benefits/features

So yes, this isn’t a battle of “Alexander vs. Darius”. It’s just a sales page that takes a lot of effort and concentration. It’s possible you could have slipped up and gone off on a tangent. So go back to your benefits and features. And examine them one by one listing the one point you wanted to make for each benefit/feature.

Does each of your benefits and features drive home a single point?

It should, because it’s only when you singularly focused on driving home the point, will you get and keep the attention of the reader.

The copywriting battle isn’t as easy one. But even when faced with incredibly uneven odds, you can still make every word on your page count.

Use single-mindedness as a strategy.

It worked for Alexander. It should jolly well work for you.


How do you get meaningful testimonials, without needing to bribe anyone for it?

 Testimonial Secrets Bonus Video

Utilizing the easy to understand, easy to implement information in this book should bring in far greater revenue. And even better, it solves a problem for me of how to get real, meaningful testimonials, doing it legitimately-and without making anything up, or needing to “bribe anyone”.

The best thing of all: I’ve learned how to get these testimonials long before anyone has bought the product!

Allen Weber
Jacksonville, Florida, USA
Judge for yourself: Testimonial Secrets



“The Brain Audit is not some ‘how to’ book– it’s a way of thinkin
g.”

What The Brain Audit provides that was missing in all of the ‘mainstream’ teaching and training is the piece critical to all sales: how the brain perceives and processes information.

Susan Trinter, Corporate Dev. Programs
Washington D.C., USA
NOW available in Different Formats ! The Brain Audit: Why Clients Buy And Why They Don’t.

 


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
2) Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

3) Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
4) Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

5) Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
6) Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
7) Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done

8) Critical Website Components: How to write compelling content for your key web pages


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) Online Membership Sites: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 

 


The Blech System of Pattern Recognition

The Blech System : Headline Writing

 

Did you eat something today?
Drank some sort of drink?
Well, there’s a good chance you’ve been exposed to the multi-billion dollar flavour industry. Almost all the products we eat or drink have these flavours and companies spend massive amounts of money researching to make sure the get the right flavour for their product. And yet, in the early 1990s, a well-known flavour company did something really weird.

They’d conduct tons of very expensive market research and then ignore that research
Instead they’d go to one of their employees and ask her to taste the flavour and they’d wait for the “blech” response. If this employee said ‘blech’ and contorted her face in disgust, the company would do something even more weird. They’d treat that particular flavour as the winner. And invariably, the flavour would do amazingly well in the marketplace.

But what was causing that employee to say “blech?”
No one really knew—not even the employee. She could kinda describe what she felt, but if you asked her to write it down so that anyone else could get the same “blech” response, she wouldn’t be able to explain it to you.

But the results were outstanding nonetheless.

This is the “blech” factor at work with most talented people
They cannot tell you why they think something is wrong. But they can spot an error a mile away. In the case study above, the employee was doing the opposite. She was identifying what she thought was an error, which of course the public loved.

It doesn’t matter which way you slice and dice the result, the fact remains: the talent for identifying the winner remained in place. But the problem is that the person still can’t explain the steps involved.

And this is why talent becomes so very mysterious
Vic Braden is a tennis coach of great repute. He has the same problem. He can spot a double fault before the player hits the ball. Professional tennis players are able to go through entire games without making more than two or three double faults. And yet, like magic, Vic can tell—long before the ball has been hit.

There’s something about the way the players hold themselves or does just before, that causes Vic to call the double fault.

And there’s a reason why they can’t explain this pattern recognition
For this we have to go down the road with two sets of parents. The sun is rising. And one parent turns to their child and says: “Look at the sunrise. It’s so beautiful.” And the child learns the word “sunrise” and “beautiful”.

The second parent walks with their child and says: “Look at the sunrise. Look how blue the sky is right at the top. Look how it then moves to a mix of yellow-ochre and blue. And then finally look how much yellow ochre there is on the horizon. And notice that orange glow just as the sun comes up, maybe even a little pink.

And yes, isn’t that a beautiful sunrise?

Now what’s happened in the brain of these two kids?
Something quite interesting actually. Both are seeing the same sunrise. But one is being exposed to a completely different set of facts that goes way beyond the terms “beautiful” and “sunrise”.

They may not even understand what “blue” and “yellow ochre” is, but they will register it.

As you have registered it in your brain right now.

When you step out to look at the sky, you will never see “blue skies” again. You will see shades in the sky that you’ve never seen though you’ve been looking at skies for decades.

The problem is that the moment of recognition is brief and often unimportant
If you asked the parent: When did you teach  your child to recognise the shades in the sky? they will often have no recollection. The child themselves, will have no recollection of the event.

And yet the brain is at work. It’s seeing the pattern and recognising it. Sometimes the pattern is pointed out by someone else, as I’m doing here. Sometimes the pattern is just detected in your brain, without any conscious effort.

Over time, the pattern builds up and there comes a moment when “blech” becomes the norm. When you can see the “blech” factor unfolding before your very eyes.

But this does bring up an important question: Why is the “blech factor” so important?
It’s important because the definition of talent (yes, my definition) is a “reduction of errors”. The fewer errors you make, the more talented you are. So for instance, if you were writing headlines and I showed you, and worked you through a series of ways to write headlines, you’d have to go through three separate stages.

Stage 1: How to detect a blech headline.
Stage 2: How to fix it.
Stage 3: How to get a great headline.

And because headline writing consists of simple elements that you add or subtract, it’s easy to know when a headline is blech
And how to fix it. When you fix it, you get a great headline. There’s no great magic to it. But without the blech factor it’s hard to tell. Because beauty or greatness is abstract. But when that child grows up a bit and looks at an oil painting that has a perfectly blue sky from top to bottom, they’ll know something is wrong.

They may not be able to tell you that the shades are missing, but they’ll voice their “blech”—and you’ll think of them as extremely talented, even though the can’t explain why they are able to spot the good from the crappy.

That employee was able to detect the blech factor
Even though the market research (yes, the very, very expensive market research) was pointing in one direction, she would be able to spot a winner by the one flavour that made her feel all “blech”. And it made her company millions of dollars in contracts.

But it’s all a mystery, because it can’t be bottled. That code may not decrypted easily. And yet, there is a code, if you’re truly interested in learning a skill.

When you find the right teacher and have a system of training in place, this code is easy to crack
You have to learn the code. And practice it. Then it becomes second nature.
You know the good stuff. And you know the blech. And you can fix it.

And people call you “amazingly talented”.
And you smile and say “thank you”.


About The Brain Audit
There are two very specific extra “weapons” that The Brain Audit gave me. Weapons that I never got from the many copy writing courses out there (and if you’re like me, you’ve got them all, too).

The Brain Audit

The Brain Audit not only explains HOW it works, but also WHY it works. This is master-level applied psychology, necessary for any self-respecting marketer.

Gabor Wolf
Marketing Consultant— Budapest, Hungary 
Judge for yourselfThe Brain Audit Kit is a complete system that enables you to understand what’s going on inside the brain of your customer.
(P.S. The Brain Audit has received over 800 testimonials)


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds
2) Client Attractors: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
3) Outlining: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines
4) Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
5) Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
6) Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done
7) Critical Website Components: How to write compelling content for your key web pages


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) New! Be Kind, Be Helpful or Begone: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website



Next Step: To get more Psychological Tactics
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Why We End Up With Skimpy Articles (When Trying To Avoid Article Bloat)

Why We End Up With Skimpy Articles (When Trying To Avoid Article Bloat)

If you’ve watched an artist at work, you’ll notice a moment when the artist twitches. The twitch comes from a dilemma: Should you add a few touches to the painting? Or leave well enough alone? And most people don’t leave well enough alone and ruin their work. Of course, once you’ve mucked up a few paintings, you tend to learn from your mistake.

And then you do the opposite. You tend to stop before the painting is completed. And this leaves the painting a bit unfinished.

Which is a lot like an unfinished article writing

In the desire to stop your article from bloating you often tend to cut it down a bit. Then a little more. And then suddenly your article is running on fumes. There’s not enough to keep the reader engaged, because all you’re really doing is jumping from point to point.

So let’s take an example of point to point, shall we?

Let’s say the article is about restoring your health, and the three points are about:

- Purging

- Tonification

- Regulation

And the moment you look at those three points, there’s a wave of dread that fills your brain

You know those aren’t just three points. You know that they’re really three whole articles. Maybe even more. You could easily write and write, and yes, write on those topics. But now you have to somehow fit those three points into this article you’re writing and so you reach for the trimmer to cut down the content to size.

Which of course makes the content far too skimpy

So the meaty part of your article would look like this:

Step 1: The importance of purging

Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah.

Step 2: Why tonification really matters

Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah.

Step 3: And that’s where regulation comes into play

Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah.

Often, a paragraph may do the job of driving a point across

Sometimes it might not quite get the detail you’re expecting to put across. In which case, your reader feels a little cheated. It looks like you’re not really giving them enough substance and just skipping from one point to the other.

So you solve this problem by adding just ONE more paragraph

Yes, just add one more paragraph and get in as much as you can in that extra paragraph. That will enable you get enough detail so the reader is happy, but it will also make you happy. And now you know, there’s no bloat.

Visually, the article will look like this:

Step 1: The importance of purging

Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah.

Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah.

Step 2: Why tonification really matters

Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah.

Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah.

Step 3: And that’s where regulation comes into play

Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah.

Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah.

Now your article isn’t too bloated

Or too skimpy either.

You’ll get that artist’s twitch sooner or later

You won’t know whether to add more to your article or not. At times like this reach for the extra paragraph and then it’s time to leave well enough alone.

And your masterpiece is ready to go.


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The best thing of all: I’ve learned how to get these testimonials long before anyone has bought the product!”

Allen Weber
Jacksonville, Florida, USA
Judge for yourself: Testimonial Secrets


NEW! The Brain Audit: Why Clients Buy And Why They Don’t (Available in Different Formats)


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
2) Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

3) Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
4) Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

5) Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
6) Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
7) Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) Online Membership Sites: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 

 


How Do You Know If Your Outline Has The Humpty-Dumpty Syndrome?

How Do You Know If Your Outline Has The  Humpty-Dumpty Syndrome?

Take one glass and put it on your dining table

Put another glass into that glass, so it stacks up.

Then another.

And keep adding glasses.

So when did you stop?

You stopped, didn’t you? And for good reason too. At some point those glasses looked very much like they were going to do a Humpty-Dumpty on you. And the clean up wouldn’t be pretty. So you stopped stacking the glasses. But did you count how many glasses you stacked, before you stopped?

I don’t count either, when I’m writing an outline

My rule of thumb is visual. Once I stack up the how, what, why, and other questions.

Once I’ve put in a few objections and examples, possibly even a mistake or two, I kinda know that the outline is going to crash. And you and I, we both don’t like crashes.

But surely someone has sat down and quantified articles that crash, right?

Yes, they have. And usually if you have a decent outline, you tend to cover about 800-1200 words. It depends on the outline, of course. If there are more text-based examples, you may cover more words. If there are more visual-based examples, you may cover less. If you go into a fair bit of detail with your example, the article may get a little bigger than usual, and that’s OK.

But what if I’m writing a book? Wouldn’t the chapters be a lot longer?

They could be. But why bother having super-long chapters? It’s great for the reader to have a break anyway, so give the reader that break. Outline your piece and if it’s going off at a tangent, turn the rest of the points into a subchapter.

The outline always gives you clues. And if I find my outline has too many points, or the points are going in another direction, I simply move those points away, so I can tidy up my current piece. And that way I now have more subchapters.

So a single chapter may consist of about 10-12 sub-chapters and that’s OK. The point is not to go nuts about the size of the article or the outline.

Let’s take an example of an outline gone a little haywire…

I. Mentoring

What is mentoring?

Who gets mentoring?

Why do people get mentoring?

Where does mentoring happen?

What professions use mentors?

Are mentors paid? What makes a good mentor?

Where can someone find a mentor?

What are benefits of mentoring?

What happens if the mentoring relationship is not a good fit?

Who decides someone needs a mentor?

Who assigns mentors?

When does one need a mentor?

When do people know they’ve learned what they can from their mentor?

How long do mentoring relationships last?

What are some mentoring horror stories?

Why is having a mentor a bad thing?

Can anyone be a mentor?

When does mentoring end?

How do mentors and mentees find each other?

What happens if the mentor and mentee don’t get along?

How do you know if mentoring works?

What kind of follow up happens after mentoring?

Is mentoring a one-way relationship?

What if someone told me to get a mentor and I didn’t want one?

What if someone told me to get a mentor and I don’t trust the one I’ve been assigned?

Is there a governing body for mentors?

You can indeed trust your eyes when dealing with outlines

Outlines are like glasses stacked up. How do the glasses look? Are they standing upright? Tipping over? If they are looking a bit tipsy, start up another stack.

And that way your outlines—and articles— don’t go the way of Humpty-Dumpty after all.


NEW! The Brain Audit is now available in many formats

Brain Audit Epub and Kindle
1) You can get a physical book
2) You can get the ePub/Kindle/PDF version for $9.99
3) You can get an audio version
4) Or you can get the the more interesting (or should we say “most interesting”) option The Brain Audit Kit.
Find out more Brain Audit Options


Top Selling Products Under $50


NEW! Critical Website Components: A Simple Step-by-Step System to Creating your Key Website Pages

1) Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
2) Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds
3) Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
4) Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines
5) Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
6) Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
7) Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) Online Membership Sites: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 

 


Why A Timer Is Your Best Friend (When Writing Articles)

Why A Timer Is Your Best Friend (When Writing Articles)

Imagine you have to go away for a week on vacation

Suddenly something intensely interesting happens with your planning. You have no time to waste. Facebook, Twitter and all other idiotic distractions never show up on your screen. TV watching becomes a luxury. Every moment of your day is focused on clearing your schedule so that your vacation is truly restful.

Incredibly, having less time causes us all to be truly productive.

And to be truly productive with article writing, we need a timer

But that’s crazy, you say. Surely a timer isn’t going to help. If a timer were the solution to the problem, every writer on the planet would simply buy that magic timer and voile, the article would get written.

But let’s put that objection away for a second and examine why a timer works.

A timer works on three separate fronts:

- Editing

- Topics

- Outlining

Let’s start with editing…

Most of us detest putting out an article that’s less than perfect. Of course, this is the opening chorus for chaos, as you can see. We write, cancel, edit, edit, write, delete, edit, edit the story is familiar to you, no doubt. But if you’ve got no time to edit, you do a cursory edit after you’re done, because hey, you have no time.

And that’s just the first reason. The second reason is simply the choice of topics.

Topics can be a menace 

Usually, if you’ve done even a bit of preparation, you’ll have about twenty topics to write about. But even if you have just two or three topics, you’ll soon start a merry dance. You’ll start writing one topic, decide that’s too hard, go to the second, and then bounce away to the third.

This chomps into your time on any given day and leaves you frustrated. But if you have a timer, the message is clear, you have no time. This is your topic, now get down to work. This gives you a clear sense of focus, and what’s more forces you to resort to the third point, namely, outlining.

Outlining becomes critical when a timer is involved

Without a timer, it’s easy to just sashay into an article, get lost and start all over again. But when time is short, you need a checklist. And your outline is your checklist.

You are forced to spend the critical five-seven minutes creating an outline (if you haven’t already done so earlier). And it forces you to make sure you don’t dawdle over the outline either. It’s all go, go, go. No time to waste.

Ok, so a timer may well help, but how do you set the timer? 

Should you set it for an hour? Two hours? Three hours? When I first began my writing career, I used to spend two days writing an article.

Obviously I had not a clue about outlines or timers. And you won’t fancy a two-day timer anyway. So here’s what you need to do:

Step 1: Set a timer for the topic.

Step 2: Set a timer for the outline.

Step 3: Set a timer for the article writing.

Step 4: Set a timer for the editing.

Step 5: Ditto for the formatting.

The topics and outlines should ideally be done the day, or night before. If you’re doing it all at one go, you’re not allowing your brain to rehearse the article in advance. But let’s say you don’t do it in advance, set about 5 minutes for the topic/sub-topic generation, and pick one topic. Then outline the topic in no more than 5-7 minutes. Any longer and you’re doing something wrong.

Writing should go on for about 60-90 minutes at best. Then you stop.

You edit for 10 minutes and format for another ten. Add it all up and you get about 130 minutes. That’s a little over two hours for an article with a timer.

But isn’t two hours a lot of time?

Yes it is. And that’s the kind of time you need to put in to turn out an article. In fact, some writers may take as many as three hours per article it really depends how much command you have over the structure.

But that’s just at the start. As you get more control over the structure of article writing, the same task can be achieved easily in under an hour.

Yes, I used to take two days to write an article. Today it takes me fewer than 45 minutes. And this means I can write 4-5 articles in a day if I choose to do so. Of course you can see how this helps when writing a course or a book.

You can now plough through about 4000-5000 words in a morning, without too much strain.

But newbie writers make the mistake of working without a timer 

And the clock ticks away relentlessly, getting the writer more tired by the minute. You see, it’s not just time that’s being drained away, but also energy. The more time you spend, the more tired you get.

The more tired you get, the more cruddy the result. By the time you get to the editing and formatting stage, you’re so exhausted that article writing seems like a chore to avoid. And eventually you decide it’s too much of a misery and avoid article writing altogether.

This painful experience can be minimised if you get that tick, tick, timer going.

A timer forces efficiency. And it forces you to stop. It gets your editing mania under control, your topics and outlining in order. And when the buzzer goes off, it’s time to finish the article.

But what if the article is unfinished?

Have you missed all your vacation flights? No you haven’t, have you?

You finished your tasks, turned off the lights, locked the door and somehow made it to the airport. In a similar manner, you’ll do the same with your articles. As you reach that deadline, you’ll get the job completed, formatted and ready to go.

Try it.

It might even end up being the key to your future vacations.

bat_smile


NEW! The Brain Audit is now available in many formats

Brain Audit Epub and Kindle
1) You can get a physical book
2) You can get the ePub/Kindle/PDF version for $9.99
3) You can get an audio version
4) Or you can get the the more interesting (or should we say “most interesting”) option The Brain Audit Kit.
Find out more Brain Audit Options


Top Selling Products Under $50


NEW! Critical Website Components: A Simple Step-by-Step System to Creating your Key Website Pages

1) Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
2) Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds
3) Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
4) Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines
5) Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
6) Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
7) Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) Online Membership Sites: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 

 


Why Spikes Are Critical To Sustain The Interest of the Reader (And How To Do It Right)

Why Spikes Are Critical To Sustain The Interest of the Reader (And How  To Do It Right)

We’ve all seen that heart monitor in hospitals, haven’t we?

It spikes up, down, then flat.

In stories, these ups, downs and flats seem to show up almost as part of the story. A story by its very nature seems to bob up and down.

Not so with articles.

In articles, it’s easy to go from point to point without creating the ups and downs. It’s easy to have so many facts that the entire article is filled with flats. So we have to take special care when writing articles. And we do this by inserting elements that instantly spike interest.

So which elements create spikes?

They are:

1) Objections

2) Stories/Case-Studies

3) Examples

1) Objections

The objection really makes a big entrance in spikiness. This is because the article is flowing one way, and the objection goes the other way 100% of the time. Let’s say your article is about making “ice-cream quickly”, the objection will almost always play devil’s advocate and talk about “making ice-cream slowly” or “making ice-cream even faster” or “making ice-cream in a whole different way”. That brings up a wall of tension. It engages the reader.

What also engages the readers a lot are stories/case-studies.

2) Stories/Case-Studies

Plop in a story anywhere at any time, and you get attention. When I first began writing back in the year 2001 or so, I didn’t realise the power of the story. I’d sit at my computer for two days in a row, trying to get the facts into my article. And somehow the article would be kinda boring. So I’d scrap it, start again, and try to stuff more facts in it.

And then one day it occurred to me what I was missing: It was the power of the story.

See that? I put a in a story. And you immediately locked in. Stories have that kind of pulling power. So do case-studies. If you talk about how Coca-Cola did this, or Harley Davidson did that, or how some scientist invented something, you get my attention.

Of course it has to be relevant to the article, but it gets that spike right up.

The third and last spike of all is the example part of your article.

3) Examples

Some articles are easy to understand. This one, for instance, doesn’t need a ton of examples. But some concepts aren’t quite that simple and examples spike interest right away. And they do so, because the reader is now directly applying the concepts to their business or life.

The example makes a big effort to explain the concept, so the reader is very focused on squeezing the maximum out of the example and reading intently. This intent reading is what causes the spike, of course.

So your article visually looks like this:

“First 50 Words” – Spike

Blah

Blah

Example – Spike

Blah

Story – Spike

Blah

Blah

Objection – Spike

Example – Spike

Example – Spike

Blah

Summary

Sandwich

Next step

Note: The blah, blah is not just blah, blah. It’s represents the facts of the article.

Also note that you don’t have to have the spikes in the exact same space all the time, but having a series of spikes keeps the reader’s interest locked in.

The spikes make the reader edge forward. The blah, blah helps them to relax a bit.

Too many spikes and it’s too hard to handle. Too few spikes and yup, it’s borrrrrring!

But what if you don’t have the opportunity to have all three elements?

Some articles don’t have the space or even the need for all three spike elements (namely, story/case study, objection and example). What do you do, then? Well, every article has space for at least two elements. And even if you’re stuck with the choice of just one, then that one needs to be “objections”.

So there you have it…

Three spike elements that create ups and downs.

But don’t disregard the flats. They’re facts and matter a heck of a lot.

Together the spikes and flats create this movement in the article to keep the reader involved.

Just like the monitor in the hospital.

As long as it’s going up, down and flat you know all is well.

 


NEW! The Brain Audit is now available in many formats

Brain Audit Epub and Kindle
1) You can get a physical book
2) You can get the ePub/Kindle/PDF version
3) You can get an audio version
4) Or you can get the the more interesting (or should we say “most interesting”) option The Brain Audit Kit.
Find out more Brain Audit Options


Top Selling Products Under $50


NEW! Critical Website Components: A Simple Step-by-Step System to Creating your Key Website Pages

1) Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
2) Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds
3) Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
4) Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines
5) Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
6) Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
7) Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) Online Membership Sites: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 

 


Why You Need to Have “Tension and Release” To Create Drama in Article Writing

Why You Need to Have "Tension and Release"  To Create Drama in Article Writing

Do you feel a headache coming on, whenever you make your to-do list?

I sure do, because no matter how much I whittle down my list, there’s always a ton of projects that need to be finished. And that’s when the headache comes on. And stays on until I do a simple act.

I choose to start on one project.

The wall of things to do hasn’t gone away, but there’s a release from the tension. And this is similar to the “tension and release” of article writing.

So what is the “tension and release” method, anyway?

When you’re writing an article, you’ll get to a stage where you are giving the customer advice. And this advice rolls out like a to-do list.

- Do this

- Then this

- Then that

- And that

- Oh yes, that too

- And don’t forget this itty bitty thing.

See that list above? It’s a wall

And let’s take an example of a real wall that would appear in your article. Let’s take an example from an article on “segmented organic data analysis”. In this article, the writer talks about the what, why, how, when of “segmented organic data analysis”.

Then it comes to the point where she wants to drive home the things you have to do—in effect, the to-do list.

And instantly she creates a wall of tension

As you look at the list below, you feel a wave of overwhelm swamping your brain. But you can’t help yourself. You have to read on. So let’s read and then get to the other side, shall we?

Here’s the writer’s wall:

As you look at your segmented organic data you can dig deeper by analysing:

• Landing pages – which pages your visitors landed on.

• Bounce rates of the landing pages – percentage of visitors coming to your site who visit just one page and leave.

• Compare low bounce rate pages with high bounce rate pages. Is there something that stands out…something you could improve to bring down the bounce rates?

• Do certain pages contribute more to your bottom line than others? Why? Is there something you can take from these pages and apply to the lower converting pages?

• Next pages – If the landing pages are doing their job, what about the secondary pages? Are these pages moving visitors forward towards the ultimate conversion point?

• New vs. returning visitors – is there a difference in their conversion rates? Do certain pages work better for new visitors?

So now we’re on the wall, but how do you create the “release?”

You simply isolate one element. Instead of going on and on, you hone in on just ONE element. Which is exactly what the writer does in her article. This is where she lets you jump over the wall and get to the other side. So instead of giving you a lot of steps, she chooses just one element from the list above.

But which element should you choose?

Yes, yes, we know. They’re all so important, but choose. Just choose one. The reader doesn’t care which one you choose. All they know is that they’re up to their eyeballs in tension, and you have break that tension.

So let’s say we chose “bounce rates” and talked about it briefly, then we’ve created a “release”. And this tension and release is great, because it creates enormous drama in your article. Your article stops being just an article and becomes somewhat like a drama-series or movie, instead.

But where do you create these movie-like “tension and release” moments?

You could do this anywhere in the article, but it’s probably best once you’ve already gone through explaining the how, what, why, when etc. Once you’ve explained the concepts, it’s time to bring out the wall and create the tension.

And then masterfully release it by giving a single way out of the mess.

The tension will bring on the headache

The release will bring great relief.

And that’s what great movies, TV series and yes, writing is about, isn’t it?


NEW! The Brain Audit is now available in many formats

Brain Audit Epub and Kindle
1) You can get a physical book (directly from Amazon)
2) You can get the ePub/Kindle/PDF version
3) You can get an audio version
4) Or you can get the the more interesting (or should we say “most interesting”) option The Brain Audit Kit.
Find out more: Brain Audit Options


Top Selling Products Under $50


NEW! Critical Website Components: A Simple Step-by-Step System to Creating your Key Website Pages

1) Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
2) Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds
3) Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
4) Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines
5) Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
6) Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
7) Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) Online Membership Sites: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 

 


Announcing! The End of Writer’s Block (The Easy Way)

Learn how knowing the core elements in outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

Way back in the year 2002, I had what you’d call “bad days”.  Actually they were worse than bad. They were foul days. These foul days were my “article writing days”.

I’d start off cheerily enough
I’d be inspired to write an article and would begin. And then something would happen–I’m not sure what. But it would bog me down. It would frustrate me, make me mad. I didn’t want to speak to anyone. I’d write draft after draft of the article. And two days later, after much agony, I’d get an article done–if it did get done.

Many of my articles just went into an article graveyard. Most were
half done.
Or almost finished. But never quite done. And then one day I realised what I was doing wrong. And the moment that realisation hit me, my output just exploded.

It wasn’t even a magic trick
It was something I’d known about for the longest time, but was resisting like crazy. But that was a turning point and I’ve never looked back.

Writer’s Block is no longer a reality
In fact the opposite is true. So many articles, so little time.

So how do you get over your “Writer’s Block” forever?
Find out for yourself
Outlining: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Warm regards from Auckland
Sean
P.S. So have a look right away.
Outlining: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines