How A Magic Moment Encourages Prospects To Become Client

Magic Moment

The first time I converted prospects to clients, I had no clue what I was doing.

I decided to give a one-hour speech and managed to get about 20 people into the room. At the end of the hour, my goal was to sign up at least a few of those people to come to more such speeches. And yet, I had no clue how to make that transition happen. How could I get a group of folks to just sign up to something in the future, without putting enormous pressure?

Quite by accident I stumbled on the concept of the “magic moment”

The “magic moment” is a moment of empowerment. It’s a moment where the magician not only performs an awesome trick, but then goes on to show you how you can do the trick with incredible accuracy.

And you’ve stepped through awe, right into a moment of being empowered. Once you’re empowered, you know for sure you can replicate the trick over and over again, thus creating the same level of awe. And you’re hooked.

At this point in time, it’s easier to convert a prospect into a client

On the Psychotactics site, we do this in the Headline report. When you first get to the site, you’re encouraged to sign up. And in exchange you get the headline report—on why headlines fail (and how to avoid that failure).

And within about 10 minutes of reading the report, you know one thing for sure:  you can do magic with headlines. You can replicate or create great headlines, solely based on three simple steps.

You know how to take the steps, and how to check if you’re making a mistake. You’ve gone from just a prospect to possible client in a matter of minutes.

Of course this doesn’t apply to headlines alone

Remember that presentation I was making? Well, the “magic moment” was when I got the entire audience to respond in the same way. There’s a point in the presentation where I show how a “trigger” works.

That when you apply this trigger to your elevator speech or tagline, you create intense curiosity and people always ask, “how do you do that?” or “what do you mean by that?” The trigger then gives you the chance to talk more about your product or service.

So yes, this trigger is explained in detail in the book called The Brain Audit (yes, it’s for sale on the Psychotactics website). And essentially what you’re doing is putting a problem, solution and target profile together.

It works like this…

Let’s say someone asks you: What do you do? You simply give your solution, don’t you? So let’s say you mow lawns for a living, you’d say, “I mow lawns”. But if you were to string a problem (lawns that need a facelift), solution (you do the facelift) and target profile (well, let’s assume you do Bill’s lawns), you get a great trigger statement. And it looks like this: wrinkle-free home lawns.

If someone said: What do you do?

You say: wrinkle-free home lawns.
They say: What do you mean by that?

Tah, dah!

So you can see how the “magic moment” works can’t you? Just like the three methods in the “headline report”, you’re also keen to know how the “trigger” works and how you can get to the next step.

And if all you do is show the magic, then you’re not really empowering anyone at all. All you’re doing is demonstrating that you can do the magic trick. Of course, this alone is enough to get the audience to want to buy, sign up or do whatever you wish them to do. But I think it’s nicer to empower the audience as well.

Empowering creates encouragement instead of the push

People like to feel like it was their own idea, instead of being pushed into making a decision. And oui, you can make the deal sweeter. If you’re selling something that day, you may want to give a special price or a special bonus that enables the clients to take up your offer.

In fact, that’s just what I did when I first started out. I’d make the speech, empower the audience and then ask them to buy my book or to sign up for future speeches. Incredibly, we had a conversion rate of 30-50%—and get this, I was still very much a newbie back then.

Whether you choose a live event, a white paper, report, audio or video, it hardly matters

What matters when you’re encouraging the prospect to move to client, is to show them an amazing trick—that “magic moment”.

Then you spend time deconstructing the trick in great detail. When you do both steps, they’re empowered. Now they want to know more and will pretty much follow you anywhere.

Well, 30-50% will, anyway smiley


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The Limited Edition Cartoon Stock Series: Not the usual crappy stock cartoons. But luscious, yummy stock cartoons drawn by Sean D’Souza and in Photoshop.


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“I have a business and attracting new customers require a continuous effort. I am always searching for ways to take my business to the next level.”

Story Telling

The Story Telling Mini Series gave me the road map for my web-site.

Demet Kitis, Canada
Judge for yourself: Story Telling Mini Series

 


Introducing!

Amazing Ebook Design In 60 Minutes: Cut out all the unneeded features and learn the key elements you need to design a professional Ebook.


Top Selling Products Under $50

Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done

Critical Website Components: How to write compelling content for your key web pages
Free! Excerpt of The Brain Audit: Why Clients Buy And Why They Don’t 


Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room-without turning anyone off?

Online Membership Website: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


Writing Salesletters or Articles? How to Ditch The “Tired” Analogy

Writing Salesletters or Articles? How to Ditch The "Tired" Analogy

I remember how I always groaned when my father started to tell his story of “how he drew a kingfisher”, when he was just a boy in school.

I loved the story, but I’d heard it so many times, that the thought of escape always crossed my mind when he’d start up that story. The reader experiences a similar “groan moment” the minute you start up on an analogy that they’ve heard before.

Analogies like how you learn to ride a bicycle, drive a car—these are tired analogies

These analogies are boring for the reader, no matter if you use it in a sales letter or in your article. So how you decide when to ditch the analogy? Or better still, how do you improve it so it’s not so “tired” after all?

Let’s take an example

In the book, The Brain Audit, there’s an analogy of standing near the airport carousel waiting for your bags to be unloaded from the flight. So what’s interesting about that situation? Well, for one it’s not something that you hear about a lot. It doesn’t have that ring of “when you learned to ride a bicycle”. And so, by merely changing the example, your analogy becomes slightly more interesting.

But what if we wanted to make it even more interesting?

This is where the power of the personal story comes in. Imagine yourself waiting for the bag. What happens? What happens next? What ups and downs do you go through just waiting for those silly ol’ bags? In The Brain Audit, the bags aren’t just bags—they’re “red” bags.

And there aren’t just “red” bags, but there are “seven red bags”. And the story rolls out where one of the bags goes missing. As you can tell, this isn’t just some tired analogy, but something that’s slightly riveting. You want to know what happens next. You want to know how all of this then reconnects to the story.

So the key to writing better analogies is to write a personal story first

Put yourself at the airport. What did you do? What happened next? And next? And yes, I know I said this already in the last paragraph, but can we have some ups and downs as well as you’re relating the analogy? In fact, the moment you dip into a personal story, even a tired story of riding a bicycle comes to life.

About the best way to sidestep a boring analogy is to use a personal story. In fact, let’s take an example of a personal story.

Only an idiot would learn to cycle like me.

Most people find the safest, flattest area to learn how to cycle. Not me. I decided to learn on slopes filled with red mud. Everytime I fell—and I fell a lot—the mud would graze me badly. And of course, learning on a slope means you’re tempting gravity all the time.

Yet, long after the wounds have healed, the learning of how to ride the bike has stayed with me.

But what if you don’t want to tell personal stories?

Well, turn the personal story into a “YOU” analogy instead. Tell the personal story but without using “I”. So the story would work like this:

Why would anyone be insane enough to find the most difficult cycling course?

Most people find the safest, flattest area to learn how to cycle. But imagine you decided to learn on slopes filled with red mud. Everytime you fell—and you do fall a lot—the mud would graze you badly. And of course, learning on a slope means you’re tempting gravity all the time.

Yet, long after the wounds have healed, the learning of how to ride the bike has stayed with you.

Notice how the analogy isn’t tired, isn’t personal and still seems like an amazing analogy?

If you’re ever reaching for a tired analogy, the first recourse would be to simply find something that’s unusual—like the “seven red bags” story. However, an even better strategy is to write a personal story because personal stories have this inbuilt oomph factor. Should you feel shy about revealing the personal story to your audience, all you have to do is simply tweak it a bit. Put in the “you” into the story and you have a great analogy.

Analogies can be used not just in articles, but also in books, presentations and sales letters

Some of the best writers and marketers know the power of the story and analogy. And they use it very effectively to drive home several points throughout their marketing or editorial material. And they mix it up a lot with analogies and stories, while the amateurs simply write yucky, boring stuff.

Tired analogies are for lazy writers.

Be not sloppy. Be not boring.

Put in the power of story in your analogy and let the “groan” go away, today!


“My biggest hesitation in joining 5000bc was trusting it’d really be a safe place to make mistakes, while still getting support. “

5000bc Membership

Your Be helpful, Be kind, or Begone messaging really helped with. I found that my membership has already paid for itself 4-5x over already.

What blows my mind is Sean’s interaction and support. 
He took me through finding the uniqueness of a new venture. He could have easily charged me $625 (his hourly consulting fee). But he didn’t, he just gave guidance and allowed others to learn from my experience.

The one thing I like most is no-BS feedback from people. The people really want to help you succeed and they receive your feedback with gratitude. It’s really beautiful.

3 other benefits would be
1. Vanishing reports
2. Audio interviews
3. Seeing the “behind the scenes” of Sean’s products and sales pages

I would definitely recommend 5000bc. Why?
Because it’s perfect support for any question you can have about marketing you are working on implementing.

John Reisinger
Tacoma, WA, USA

Judge for yourself and get on the waiting list.


Top Selling Products Under $50


Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
 Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done

Critical Website ComponentsHow to write compelling content for your key web pages

The Brain Audit has been around for many years and has over 800 testimonials. It is  a complete system that enables you to understand what’s going on inside the brain of your customer.
Not read about The Brain Audit as yet? Find out more here.


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) Online Membership Website: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 


Why A Unifying Theme For A Product Helps Tell/Sell Your Product A Lot Quicker

Why A Unifying Theme For A Product Helps Tell/Sell Your Product A Lot  Quicker

Some days I will put on my iPod, I turn on and let it choose a set of songs for me.

By the time it’s playing its third Sting song, I decide—yup, let’s just turn off the random selection, and let me listen to the entire Sting series of albums. On other days, I will go right to the iPod, put on the Sting album, knowing just what I want to hear for the next hour or so.

But how did I end up bugging my wife for the next 72 songs of Sting?

I do so by choosing a unifying theme. Whether the iPod plays just one Sting song after another, or chooses from a selection to bring up the same Sting-genre of music, it’s using a theme to make the music appealing to me. And this same concept applies to your products and courses.

So let’s just clarify: What is a unifying theme?

A unifying theme is simply the one word/thought that drives your product/course.

It’s much like you’d have at a theme wedding or a theme party and everything and everyone conforms to the theme. In the same way, a product/course should have a single theme running right through, which then binds the product together.

But why is this binding so very important?

It’s important for several reasons

1) It helps the writer

2) It allows the reader to understand concepts better

3) Boosts the chances of better publicity/marketing

1) How it works for the writer

When you sit down to create a product, more often than not, there’s confusion in your mind. You know too much and it’s hard to get a thread that runs through the entire product/course. If you did have that thread, it becomes easier to fit the elements of the product/course to the unifying theme. So, for example, when I wrote the series on ‘Black Belt Presentations’, I had a similar problem. There were hundreds of books out on presentations already. And they covered tons of aspects of presentations. To make my series different, I had to choose a unifying theme.

The unifying theme chosen was “control”

I realised that all the information I had needed to be split up into three parts: control of visuals, control of structure of presentation and control of audience. I also realised that in doing so, the series was covering ground that the other books weren’t. So for me, as the writer, it gave me the benchmark to then create three separate books and put it under one unifying theme. Instead of mashing a ton of information wildly together, as is done with many books, I could focus on the specific aspect of control.

And yes, this specific theme helps the reader too.

2) How does it work for the reader?

Most readers are swamped with courses or products that don’t have a unifying theme. Even some of the best-selling books on the planet, simply mash concepts, research and examples together without having a clear binding force. And this means the reader bounces from concept to concept madly, trying to understand the concept and apply it to their own life or business. When the product/course has a clear unifying theme, it’s like that theme party. Everyone knows why they’re wearing their 70′s suit and handlebar moustaches and it’s easier to assimilate the information.

But the advantages of the unifying theme don’t stop there. It’s pure shark-bait for marketing and publicity.

3) How it helps with marketing and publicity

The media has always thrived on something short and sweet. They call it a soundbite.

When a reporter asks you: What is your book or course about? You need to be clear what it’s about in a single line, or single word, if possible. So when they ask, what is the ‘Black Belt Presentations’ about, we can say “control”. When they ask, what is The Brain Audit about, we can say, “Why customers back away at the last minute”. So we can use a slightly longer set of words (a line) or a single word. And as you can tell, they’re both shark-bait.

Immediately the media person knows, you know your stuff

Because the next question will be: Oh, and what is that? And that gives you the permission to quickly tell your story on radio, TV, magazines. But say you never go to the media, your sales page is still a media outlet. The customer still wants that sound bite about your product/course. So in effect, the unifying theme doesn’t just help you put things together, but also helps you sell/tell the world about that product/course.

Of course, this leaves us with one puzzling question: How do we get to this unifying theme in the first place?

There are two ways. The first way is simply to keep ploughing through writing the rough draft of your notes or slides. I personally would be inclined to do a slide-like storyboard, even if I were writing just a book.

You might want to do a mind map, or stick Post-It® stickers all over your wall

But once you have all the points down, you need to find something that clearly connects all the parts together. Something that you can ideally sum up in one word.

If you can’t do it yourself, organise a set of friends, or clients or anyone who will be able to help, so that you can work out what binds your product/course together. But as you’d expect, there’s another way.

The other way is to decide in advance

You decide that you’re going to write an article writing course, and you choose the word “drama”. Now every part of the article writing course or book must hinge on drama. And so, in a way, you’re force fitting the ideas to a unifying theme. Now the word you’ve chosen becomes a benchmark to measure against.

And this is where the biggest problem lies

When you’ve come to your one word/your theme, you’ll want to choose something else.

Like I could choose another type of music on my iPod. Or we could choose from dozens of party themes. But instead, we grit our teeth, make our decision and stick with it. And that creates the foundation of a great product/or course.

Try it. It’s like the experience of listening to 72 songs of Sting back to back.

For me, it’s heaven. For my wife, it’s hell.

But at least there’s a unifying theme for both of us.


NEW! The Brain Audit is now available in many formats

Brain Audit Epub and Kindle
1) You can get a physical book (directly from Amazon)
2) You can get the ePub/Kindle/PDF version
3) You can get an audio version
4) Or you can get the the more interesting (or should we say “most interesting”) option The Brain Audit Kit.
Find out more Brain Audit Options


Top Selling Products Under $50


NEW! Critical Website Components: A Simple Step-by-Step System to Creating your Key Website Pages

1) Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
2) Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds
3) Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
4) Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines
5) Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
6) Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
7) Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) Online Membership Sites: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 

 


The Best Way To Fail, Is To Stop

The Best Way To Fail, Is To Stop

How do you fail at something?

You simply stop.

I’ve seen people who could be exceedingly good writers, artists etc.

And yet they stop.

Then they lose momentum.

And they possibly never regain that pace and momentum again.

The interesting part is that they don’t intend to stop forever

They just stop for a day, which turns into two, which snowballs into weeks and months. And then it’s just too hard to recover. I know this because I’ve done it often enough. I’ve drawn cartoons for a little over 30 years. You could say I’m pretty good at it.

But all I have to do is stop

Suddenly I lose the ability to draw. I look at the paper. I look at the pencil. The paints are tucked away somewhere in the deep recesses of my desk. And the days and weeks slide into oblivion until it takes enormous effort just to get started again. And this is with something I love and am very capable at doing.

Imagine the frustration when you’re learning something, and you stop 

It’s a lot worse. And what bugs you even more is the mindless excuses you make. You think your excuses seem logical. No they don’t. An excuse is an excuse. Everyone has time to do what they want to do. All of us take the time to bathe, brush and clothe ourselves, even on the busiest of days.

But surely everyone needs a break…

Yes they do, and go right ahead and take that break. But be aware that the longer the break, the more you’ll have to battle resistance to get back to where you once were.

So keep the break short. If Mt. Everest falls on your head and you need an unexpected break, well take it, but make sure you have someone bugging you to get back.

Someone? Yes, anyone. It could be a friend, a neighbour, your spouse, lover, even a nine-year old who lives down the street. They’ll nudge you, bug you, remind you. And then you’ll decide to start again. It’s much too easy to fall off the bandwagon and not get back on, if you’re working alone. So get yourself a co-pilot that will make sure you don’t stop.

Because the best way to fail is to stop.

Stop reading.

Stop writing.

Stop drawing.

Stop walking.

Stop.

It’s a sure recipe for failure.

————————-

NEW! The Brain Audit is now available in many formats

Brain Audit Epub and Kindle
1) You can get a physical book (directly from Amazon)
2) You can get the ePub/Kindle/PDF version
3) You can get an audio version
4) Or you can get the the more interesting (or should we say “most interesting”) option The Brain Audit Kit.
Find out more Brain Audit Options.


Top Selling Products Under $50


NEW!  Critical Website Components
A series of three books on how to create your “Home Page”, “About Us” and “Get Customers To Sign Up”.

1) Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
2) Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds
3) Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
4) Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines
5) Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
6) Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
7) Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) Online Membership Sites: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 

 


How Slightly Exuberant Sub-Topics Get You In Trouble

How Slightly Exuberant Sub-Topics Get You In Trouble

Have you heard about a program called InDesign?

Well, if you haven’t, it’s a program I use to create amazing-looking e-books. Then one day, someone asked me to show them how to create e-books similar to what I was doing. Could I, she asked, create a video-based product that would teach her the precise steps to learning how to create the e-book, the e-book, and nothing but the e-book?

So that’s what I did. I mapped out the steps required to get an e-book up and running.

But what does this product have to do with article writing?

Think about it: What is a product? Yup, that’s correct. It’s a bunch of articles. When you string those articles together and cover the points needed, voilà, it’s a product. And if we are to write articles, we need to write outlines. And to write outlines, we first need to create topics and sub-topics. How hard could that be?

Not hard if you do less work, instead of more

Yes, yes, don’t read the previous line again. It’s important to do LESS than more, because the moment you do more, you get yourself tangled. And the best way to see the tangling is to watch it in slow motion, with an example. So let’s roll those slow motion cameras, shall we?

And let’s get back to that InDesign product I was creating.

Step 1: Topic = InDesign

Step 2: Sub-topics:

We can do this the wrong way, or the right way. Heh, heh, of course we’re going to do this the wrong way to begin with. So let’s tackle the first wrong way. Where you think that instead of writing short, short, short sub-topics, you end up with a sort of outline.

- How do we create shortcuts?

- Why is systemising folders important?

- Do we really need the library?

- Can we do without master pages?

Nope that won’t work

And it’s unlikely that you’ve done the questions. But you may have still added some extra words here and there. Let’s look at what’s possible.

- How to create shortcuts

- The importance of folder systemisation

- Why libraries are crucial

- Getting master pages to work

Or we might not even go so far. We might just repeat ourselves for no reason

- Shorcuts in InDesign

- Folder systemisation in InDesign

- Libraries in InDesign

- Master pages in InDesign

And of course all of these are not needed. So now that we know what’s not needed, how do we do less and get more?

Topic: InDesign

Sub-topics:

- Shortcuts

- Folder Systemisation.

- Library

- Master pages

So why is less more important?

The trouble arises when we expand the sub-topic. Usually a sub-topic will expand like this:

Sub-topic = Shortcuts

Outline

- What are shortcuts in InDesign?

- Why are they important?

- When do you use shortcuts?

- Where can you change shortcuts?

- What are the three most important shortcuts to know?

- But what if I want my own shortcuts?

- Summary

- Next step

Now instead of just the term “shortcuts”, let’s take the questions instead

Sub-topic = How do we create shortcuts?

Outline = ?

You get stuck, don’t you? Instead of that question “how do we create shortcuts”, you could have restricted it to just “creation”. That would make the sub-topic go one level lower. Because now you’re not just talking about shortcuts, but how to “create” shortcuts. And in doing so, you realise that there’s a whole world of stuff to do with just “shortcuts”.

But we don’t want to dive so deep yet

And we don’t want to confuse ourselves.

So we avoid questions, long sentences and repeating ourselves. And that enables us to create sharp, precise outlines.

Here’s a visual example

How Slightly Exuberant Sub-Topics Get You In Trouble

Notice how for the most part, the sub-topics have been restricted a single word? That’s because you don’t need any more. In some cases, the term “gradation” has been written over and over again. Again, that’s overkill. It’s not terrible, but you don’t need it.

Note also that this is the first draft of the outline. So it’s mostly to get the topics and sub-topics. The complete outlining will follow later. But some ideas popped into my head and I didn’t want to lose them, so I did jot them down.

And yes, that is my handwriting. How Slightly Exuberant Sub-Topics Get You In Trouble

But what if I put in two or three words, instead of just one?

Sometimes you will find that sub-topic requires more than one word. Well that’s fine. Keep it whole. In one of my outlines I have terms like “gradation wash” or “recognizing junk”.

This is not about getting it down to a single word. It’s about avoiding needless words when outlining. It’s about avoiding the confusion from writing sub-topics that go off tangent.

So when creating outlines be sure to take these steps

1) First create topics.

2) Create short, non-exuberant sub-topics. The fewer words you use, the better.

3) Then outline and you’ll find that it’s much easier to outline your article.

I started out with the InDesign product and a coffee later, I was done

I didn’t need to think through the detail. I just needed to have the topic and the sub-topics as short as possible. That took under 10 minutes and I was done.

The outlining would come later and wouldn’t hassle me at all.

Less is mostly more.

Try it.


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
2) Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds
3) Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
4) Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines
5) Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
6) Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
7) Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) New! Online Membership Sites: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 

 


How To Prevent Dropouts In Courses (With Monkeys And Dinosaurs)

How To Prevent Dropouts In Courses (With Monkeys And Dinosaurs)

When I was in school, I wanted to learn the guitar. But Mr.Henderson wasn’t having any of that. He wanted me to learn to read music. He wanted me to pass the Trinity School of music exam. And I didn’t learn the guitar.

Then I moved on to university, and I ran into this guitar teacher. Again, it was the same problem. He wanted me to learn scales. And so I did, but then I soon gave up.

Do you see the problem?

Most of us have this idea of what we want to teach, and we have a system. The system may be weak or strong, but it’s our system. And then we impose this system on most people. Which is perfectly fine.

But this is also the exact point where things should be going right—and they can often go wrong.

Let’s take the cartooning course, for instance

The key element of cartooning isn’t drawing—it’s scribbling. Scribbling like you did when you were a child. Sure it’s a lot more controlled, but you still have to scribble. But guess what?

Participants on the course want to draw, and scribble. And so you build the course with work and play.

They get to do fun stuff, as long as they also do the assignment. And so just like they can scribble in the cartooning course, they can also write headlines about monkeys and dinosaurs in the headline course. And they can write without outlines (yes, horror) in the Article Writing Course. And they can try to sell some weird, funny object in the copywriting course.

You get the picture, right?

Because I didn’t.

Even when a student veered off into fun land, I would pull them back like Mr.Henderson. I’d want them to stay focused and on target. And even if I did initiate some fun activity, I’d promptly drop it after a week or two, because we had to “get down to business”.

And I didn’t realise how silly I was being until someone protested and protested a bit vociferously. The good part about this story is that I do listen.

But listening is like reading…

You can read something but unless it’s implemented, you haven’t done much at all. And so it’s important to go back and tweak all the new courses.

But what about the courses that are already in progress? Well, you tweak those too. Add that element of fun in the weeks to come. Yes, it’s a bit of work, but hey it takes work to create a bit of play.

And it’s important for the brain as well as for morale

When a participant is scribbling, they’re not just having fun, but they’re learning as well. A ridiculous headline is also as good a teacher as a perfectly serious one. An article without any structure is still like having a cafe conversation.

It’s not amazing in its sequence, but it works. Yes, the brain loves it and so does the group. When you’re looking through a sea of work, work, work, it’s so much fun to spot the funny headlines, the crazy scribbles etc. So the group loves it too.

But we all are a bit like Mr. Henderson

We love our scales. And we know it’s work. And important. But it’s time to have fun as well. We learn as much through play as work. And so go check out your courses. What can you tweak?

Do you see monkeys and dinosaurs in your course, yet?

You should, you know.


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
2) Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds
3) Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
4) Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines
5) Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
6) Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
7) Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) New! Online Membership Sites: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 

 


Why Driving Home the “BEFORE and AFTER” Scenario Is Critical To Get Superb Testimonials

Why Driving Home the BEFORE and AFTER Scenario Is Critical To Get Superb Testimonials

A testimonial can go wrong.

Horribly wrong.

And it doesn’t take much for it to go off track. All it takes is using the wrong words. If you use the wrong words, the customer is confused. And the testimonial goes over the hill, down the ravine and smashes into a million teeny-tiny fragments.

No, we don’t like that scenario at all

So we have to understand what we’re really doing when asking for a testimonial. And at the very core, we’re asking customers for a “before” and “after” scenario. We’re asking them to give their story, in detail. And how they felt. Detail, yes, that’s it. But also the emotion. Both for the “before” and for the “after”.

But what’s good for the goose is not always good for the gander…

You may ask a “WHY” question to a client and get a perfectly wonderful story. But you may just as well run into a blank wall of logic, that you don’t want. So yeah, using the six questions is great, but hey, let’s prep up the customer a bit as well. Let’s let them know why we’re asking for this testimonial and what results we’d expect.

But first, let’s do it slightly wrong

Instead of prepping up the customer, let’s just jump into the logical question and, as you’d expect, often get a logical but worthless answer.

Here is the logical question (the first question you’d ask the customer)

Why did you decide to buy this iPad?

Why did you decide to buy this microphone?

Why did you decide to come to this headline course?

Why did you decide to buy baa baa black sheep?

And tah, dah, the answers are…

I decided to buy the iPad because I wanted one.

I decided to buy this microphone because I needed to record a podcast.

I decided to come to this headline course to learn more about headlines.

I decided to buy baa baa black sheep because I have too many green sheep.

The WHY doesn’t prompt the story in every case

It may simply prompt a quick, logical answer. Yet if you ask the scenario: What was your situation before you bought this product, you get a story.

What was your situation before you bought the iPad?

What was your situation before you joined this headlines course?

What was your situation before you bought this black sheep?

The situation brings out the story.

When the story is told, ask the next question: the “after” question.

What did you find as a result of buying the iPad?

What did you find as a result of joining the headlines course?

What did you find as a result of buying this black sheep?

Now you’re getting a complete story: “before” and “after” but it doesn’t stop there.

You’ve warmed up the customer with the first two questions

Now they’re ready to give you even more detail about other points that they liked as well. And as you go down the list of questions, they will reiterate why they feel that way, and why they would recommend you. They now realise you’re asking a “before” and “after” scenario.

But you can do even more

You can get the client to realise they’re not just giving a testimonial, but giving their experience. That you really need to know what they felt “before” and then “after”. You want to know the pain “before” and the relief “after”. The more you get the client to understand that it’s a story/experience that you’re looking for, the less chances you have of running into snappy, logical answers.

This is because the client wants to help

They truly do. They want to see you succeed and will mostly, yes mostly, give you exactly what you need. There are always exceptions. There are always clients who never stick to the point, are full of themselves etc. But for the most part, if you warm up the client, tell them what you’re expecting and then bring in the “before” and “after” questions, you’ll get a powerful testimonial.

It’s easy to simply take the testimonial questions from The Brain Audit and run it, but the results may be unpredictable

Instead spend a little time explaining your situation to the client.

Put in the footwork. It pays big time.

And both the client and you are happy.

P.S. Do you have a question or comment? Write it here and I will respond.


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) Testimonials Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
2) Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds
3) Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
4) Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines
5) Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
6) Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
7) Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) New! Online Membership Sites: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website



Next Step: To get more Psychological Tactics
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How To Use Objections To Get Awesome Before-After Testimonials

How To Use Objections To Get Awesome Before-After Testimonials

Haven’t you ever been in a group where there’s a slacker?

Everyone’s working really hard, but there’s this one person that won’t do much, and so everyone else has to work a lot harder.

On a sales page, or in your brochure, you’re going to have a similar problem if you have sugary testimonials

That’s because sugary testimonials are just lazy. They just tell you that the product is “great or wonderful” and they’re often hard to believe. But reverse testimonials are a lot easier to believe because they contain a critical element: objections.

When your reverse testimonial starts off with the objection, it immediately gets the attention of a prospect.

But how do you get the objections in the first place?

There are a couple of ways to achieve this goal.

Method 1: You can force an objection on a client.

Method 2: You can simply ask the client.

Method 1: You can force an objection on a client

Let’s say you have a product (and yes, the same applies to a service), but getting back to the product. And if you’re smart, you’ll already know what objections your prospects have when considering your product. So they may have a list like:

- It’s too big.

- It’s too expensive.

- It’s too blue.

- It’s too noisy.

It’s likely that you will be able to come up with about six core objections. And if you can’t, it’s not hard to ask around and get those objections from your client. And now that you have a list, and it’s time to get a testimonial, you can simply call up your client and pick one of the objections from the list.

The conversation would go like this:

“Most peoples biggest objection when buying this product was that it was too blue. Was that your objection as well?” And if it is, then the client agrees. Now it’s just a matter of digging deep and staying on that one objection.

“So why was the blue such a problem?”

“What did you feel when you realised it was blue?”

“What were the other issues with the blue colour?”

And you’ll get rich detail spilling out like a gusher

And once you ask the question and get the answer, you can move onto the second question: “Now that you have the product, what has been your experience?”

And so, you’ve randomly picked an objection from the list, the client has agreed and then it’s down to your questioning skills.

But hey, what if the client doesn’t agree?

Well, that’s easy isn’t it? If they say: “No, blue was not an issue at all”, then your next question would be: “So what was the biggest issue/objection?” And that answer will roll out and you’ve got the testimonial off the blocks.

But you don’t always have to force the issue on the client. You can just ask.

Method 2: Asking the client about their objection

This is just like it sounds. You ask the client what was going through their mind before buying the product. And the objection they had to buying it. Was it their first experience? Was it the second experience and did they have a bad experience before? What was really going on in their heads at the time?

The second method may not always get results

Your prospect may not be able to remember the objection they had in the first instance. This is why the first method may work better, because it forces the prospect to reject (or accept) your objection. And if they reject it, obviously they have to come up with the objection they had in the first place.

Be sure to also listen for emotions, as the client speaks

You don’t want to rush through your testimonial-acquisition process. One of the most critical elements isn’t just getting the objection, but also the emotion behind the objection. And you should be listening for words like “frustrated, angry, demoralised, irritated”.

If the objection comes up and you don’t get a story with emotion, your testimonial will be less powerful. So make sure that you also ask the prospect how they feel. Your question would be: “So how did that problem make you feel?” And they’ll be sure to tell you and give you that non-sugary testimonial that you were looking for.

Either way it’s a win-win

The client gets to give a very authentic testimonial. And they’re happier because at the very core they want to see you more successful. And you get a testimonial that’s worth displaying prominently on your marketing material.

Slacker testimonials make every other element work harder.

It’s about time you got your testimonials to pull their own weight, eh?

P.S. Do you have a question or comment? Write it here and I will respond.

======
Announcing! Headlines Course: How To Write Amazingly Powerful Headlines (Every Single Time)
—Only 5 Seats Remaining!
Check out the details at http://psychotactics.com/headlines-course


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) Testimonials Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
2) Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds
3) Client Attractors: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
4 Outlining: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines
5) Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
6) Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
7) Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) New! Be Kind, Be Helpful or Begone: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website



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Announcing: Membership Site Strategy Book (Yes, you can buy it today at a special early bird rate)

I started writing this book around August 2009.
Now it’s 2013.

And it’s the story of 5000bc.
A membership site that hasn’t lasted just one, or two years
but will be around–and thriving for 10 whole years.

Introducing “Be Kind, Be Helpful or Begone”- A book
on how to create a thriving, helpful community online.

A book that takes you deep into the world of community
and consumption. Yes, consumption too–close to a hundred
pages on that topic alone.

The Early Bird Price
And the best price.
The final price will be $129.
Right now it’s just $89.

Get it while you can.
http://psychotactics.com/products/membership-site-strategy

Warm regards,
Sean
P.S. Yes, the price will go up.


The Magic of Vanishing Reports (And How It Increases Consumption on Membership Sites)

The Magic of Vanishing Reports (And How It Increases Consumption on Membership Sites)

Around 1970 or so, a guy called Bill Gaines did something  pretty interesting. You see, Bill Gaines was the publisher of the famous comic known, weirdly, as ‘Mad Magazine.’

And he’d put in a whole bunch of gags and cartoons in the magazine itself. Then, several months later, he’d take that content and mix a part of it with other content. And created a theme which he’d put in what he called a ‘pocket book’.

So why would subscribers buy the very same content the second time around?

The answer lies in packaging. When any content changes form, it gains in value. Suddenly, people who may have never noticed the content, now scramble to get their hands on it.

And that’s how the Vanishing Reports were born

Vanishing reports are exactly what they seem to suggest. They’re reports that show up, and then disappear. All the reports are in a PDF format too, but here’s the interesting part. All the content almost always exists on our membership site at 5000bc.com. This means that members can access the information at any time. But invariably, they don’t.

And part of the reason is that like every site your membership site (and mine) will have too much information. And the way to get the member to consume, you need to use the steps outlined in the consumption model:

1) Remove the intimidation

2) Create isolation

3) Which leads to implementation

We know that too much information creates intimidation, so we did what Bill Gaines did. We isolated the content, repackaged it in what we called the Vanishing Report and emailed the members. And the day the report comes out, the engagement goes nuts. Suddenly the place is swarming with members keen to get their report. Just for good measure, we don’t give them a direct link, but instead make the members come to the forum to get the report.

At this stage, members who may not have been engaging, get involved. They comment on the report, they ask more questions and they also do other things on the forum. And yes, isn’t that interesting? In most cases, the information exists and yet members want the information in a different format.

Now to be fair, these aren’t just text reports shoddily put together

They do have cartoons and a nice layout. They do provide a different experience and different format. Just like the pocket books from Mad Magazine did. The readers had already read the cartoons before, but they didn’t care.

The new format was differently sized and themed, and it was certainly worth the money to get the pocketbooks. In fact, Mad didn’t stop there. They started bringing out thick, telephone-directory-like products.

Again, it was just the same content recyled, but the audience didn’t care. They wanted it. And while it made Bill Gaines a millionaire (in the age where millionaires were really millionaires) it also increased consumption of Mad Magazine cartoons.

The Vanishing Reports, as you can tell, are quite similar in nature

But there are differences. For one, you could always get a copy of Mad pocket books. Not so with the Vanishing Reports. Sometimes they just vanish. And once they vanish, they may show up again, but there’s no specific timeline. And when they do show up, it’s usually for a price, instead of being free.

Customers are no dummies

They know that the PDF format is more reader friendly. They know they can stick that report into their iPad or Kindle. Or even print it out. And so the swarming happens every time. Even if a member doesn’t read the articles for months on end—thus missing some good content, they always pay close attention once a Vanishing Report is announced.

This Vanishing Report concept can be used on many membership sites

And yet many people don’t use it. And their reasoning is that they can’t withhold content from their paying members. Which is rubbish. When you offer something, you’ve made your offer very clear.

And so you can do jolly well what you like, provided you’ve outlined the terms. So when the Vanishing Report vanishes, yes there will be some grumbles, but mostly from people who were too busy to get the report, or from those who joined too late to pick up the report. Whatever the reason, most members completely buy into the concept and you don’t want the few rumblings to worry you too much.

That’s one point.

The other is that (as we’ve stated before) you can have the exact material on your website. So if someone is missing the Vanishing Report on a topic like ‘Strategic Alliances’, they could easily find it on the membership site anyway. So what the Vanishing Report does, is create engagement at several levels.

1) It gets people to read your content in PDF format.

2) It gets those who missed the report, to go hunting for articles (and reading some more valuable content as well). Yes, it all creates engagement and hence consumption.

3) When the members come in for the Vanishing Report, they engage in other discussions, start up posts of their own etc. It gets them back into the site and engaged with the other members.

The Vanishing Reports are easily one of the most popular feature of the membership site at 5000bc. And you should try it too. Because we all love when someone isolates something and packages it nicely just for us.

It’s not as “MAD” as it sounds!

P.S. Do you have a question or comment? Write it here and I will respond.

Why You Need The Brain Audit


“What do your customers think? What would make them buy?”

The Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy And Why they Don't

In the Brain Audit – Sean teaches 7 steps on how to form killer communication pieces that makes people buy from you.

The Brain Audit is a simple psychological system that everyone can use in their communication to increase their profits.”

Ankesh Kothari – Biztactics, USA
Read more about The Brain Audit
http://www.psychotactics.com/brainaudit


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) NEW! How To Put That Zing-Kapow In Your Articles (With StoryTelling)
So what are the elements of a well-told story? And why have they been playing hide and seek with us for so long?

2) You already know that 80% of a sales letter depends on your headline.
So what’s the remaining 20% that causes customers to buy? Find out more

3) Do You Often Hit A Wall Called ‘Writers Block’?
Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

4) Do you know that visuals immediately improve your sales conversion?
Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

5) Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

6) Chaos Planning
Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly it is February, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.


Black Belt Presentations
How to create presentations that enthral, hold and move an audience to action.



Next Step: To get more Psychological Tactics
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Why I Gave Up Video (And Why I’m Back)

I didn’t give up video. I just got busy.
You know how it is, right? You want to do something and then you make this grand list. Then you do a bit of it. And you do some more. And some more. And you get results. And then you do a spectacularly stupid thing.

You give up.

Why? No one knows for sure.
It’s not like video took me more time. In fact, the first time I tried to make a video  (I say ‘try’ because I didn’t complete the video) it took me five hundred and eight hours.

A couple of hours of shooting. Five hundred hours of wondering how lousy I’d look and sound on video. And the remaining six hours of fiddly stuff with the right location, video software etc.

And yet a month or two later, we were shooting eight videos in an hour

My wife, Renuka would set up the camera. We’d switch on the lights. And I’d speak. No teleprompter, no reading from notes, nothing. Just speak as though I was speaking to a client.

And no, I didn’t start out that way. I needed the notes. I bought several teleprompters. Then I just got sick of the whole process and decided to shoot whatever I possibly could in an hour.

And it was ONE take. No second take. The less I focused on getting it right vs. getting it done, the more videos got done. But it was killing me to script, shoot, edit, put titles, keywords and upload the darned thing.

Bah! It was maddening!

So I hatched a devious plan

I contacted some kids at school and one of them showed up, keen to edit video. Now he had standing instructions. He had to show up and never call. If he called, I might say something like, “Let’s skip this week”.

But if I knew he was going to show up anyway, I had to do the video. This kid was free for a few hours on Saturday. I’d shoot on Friday evening. One hour. Eight videos. Back to back. Then I’d need a beer or two.

But something happened along the way

I can’t remember the details. But I just gave up. The kid stopped showing up. Maybe we went on vacation. Maybe something else happened. The point is irrelevant. I just stopped.

And that’s what we all do. We stop. And we have to be re-booted once again.

So towards the end of last year, I did the reboot. I contacted a film school and asked if their alumni were keen to earn some money. Three eager beavers showed up. Two dropped out, for some weird reason. One stayed. And he’s good!

And that’s a lesson in itself

Trying to do the scripting, shooting, editing, rendering, uploading is a pain in the you-know-where. You may start off all nice and cheery, but projects come in the way, chaos drops in for a beer and then all hell breaks loose. You definitely need to get some help. Kids all around you know how to use video cameras and all tend to have access to a computer.

And they will spend the time editing, if not shooting for you. I prefer to have the person shoot and edit, and that is the best way going forward. That way you, the talent, can do the prep work, get time to actually comb your hair and then do the shoot in one go.

Or two. Or five. But at least once it’s done, it’s done.

And so in two weeks, we’ve shot seventeen videos

Not in two weeks. In two hours, just spread over two weeks.

I know, I know. It sounds intimidating, but it’s only intimidating for the first five hundred and eight hours. After that you get used to the camera, just like you get used to looking at yourself in the mirror.

And while those seventeen videos were the live videos, I got back into making screencasts as well.

Now screencasts are tough

They’re tough if you want to do a good job. Because there’s no live movement, you have to create the movement. So a 30-minute video may have as many as 250 slides and about 300 specific animation points.

That’s not counting the audio recording time (which I do separately) and the graphics. And the layout. And the storyboard. And another half a dozen things. In short, it’s a big production. And often people make screencasts because they’re afraid of facing the screen.

Well don’t let me stop you from making 250 slides

But if you’re looking to save time, live action is better. It’s quicker. It’s easy to trash and start again. You may not like your voice and you may not like your face on video, but you’ll get over it sooner or later.

Probably later, but there will be a time (and get this) when you will actually like your voice. No, I’m not kidding. Then people have to shut you up.

The final reason for making screencasts is because you have something that needs to be demonstrated, rather than spoken.
Of course the final reason is just that you’re a sucker for punishment—which I am.

So why did I start making video again?

Well, I don’t know about you, but if there’s a page of pretty pictures to see, or if there’s text on this page, I still click on the video. I will head to an Apple.com page in all its glory and pretty pictures and bingo—it’s the video I want to see.

Well-made video is quicker and more tidy than reading a whole page of stuff. But let’s say you’re not me. Let’s say for instance you are the one who reads the pretty words and loves the pictures. Well, then there’s a good chance you have a client like me.

A client who wants videos. And so you may not be a video-watching person yourself, but your client loves video. And so you do what’s needed.

So I buckled down and made the video.

I made live videos.
I made screencasts.
And I’m going to make videos for our sales pages as well. Because I know they work. I’ve seen them work on painful people like me, who don’t want to read or see pretty pictures. And while it’s not always fun to get the script, the topics and do all that speaking etc., it’s now a lot of fun to see the finished product. It’s nice. It’s effective.

And more importantly, it doesn’t take five hundred and eight hours any more.

Phew!

P.S. If you’re considering video, and especially if you’re considering screencasts, you will want to look at Black Belt Presentations. It really, really helps.

Do you have a similar story to share? Post it here.


Next Step
“There are marketing books and there are marketing books – I bet there are not many you have read many times over?

The Brain Audit really teaches you the art of persuasion because it gives an insight into how people’s brains work. I have used the principles in writing WebPages, writing articles, making presentations, networking, negotiating and even writing submissions for a judge!

But the best bit about the Brain Audit is that it actually works.The principles are easy to understand.

Would I recommend it to people serious about getting on in business? Absolutely.

mikes

Michael Smyth, approachablelawyer, Auckland
Judge for yourselfThe Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy And Why They Don’t


I was wary of signing up and paying for a forum or another membership site

“If you suspect that your business could be bringing in a lot more revenue but you don’t have a clue how to make that happen without hype or hassle, 5000bc is a must-have resource.

I honestly didn’t see what 5000bc could offer me that I couldn’t get from Sean’s books. Besides, how could a bunch of people – most of whom are not business experts – help me build my business?

I joined anyway because the price was right and I wanted the information that came with the premium membership. ;-)

The information and support I received from Sean and my fellow “cavers” about a single Web page was directly responsible for selling $10,000 worth of books in less than two weeks.

Unlike many Web communities, 5000bc members are active and to the point. Sean keeps adding content that drills down to specific problems in business and then shows you how to solve them.

Try it. You won’t regret it.”

5000bc: Small Business Marketing Memembership| Molly Gordon testimonial
Molly Gordon, Master Certified Coach
Shaboom Inc, USA

Judge for yourselfHow 5000bc can make your business succeed.


Products: Under $50
You already know that 80% of a sales letter depends on your headline.
So what’s the remaining 20% that causes customers to buy? Find out more

1) Do You Often Hit A Wall Called ‘Writers Block’?
Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

2) Do you know that visuals immediately improve your sales conversion?
Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

3) Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

4) Chaos Planning
Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly it’s January, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.

5) Nothing bugs you more than a painful client.
A client who hassles you at every step of the way. Learn how to use the power of the ‘six critical questions’ to get incredible testimonials—and attract clients that make every day an absolute joy.


Presentation Series! Black Belt Presentations: How do you create presentations that enthrall, hold and move an audience to action?

 


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The Choice Paradox: Why Customers Want More And Less Simultaneously

Take out that cell phone from your bag.
 And look at the features.

It can tell time; it can be a stopwatch; it can keep diary appointments; it can help you pass time with ingenious
 little games; it can probably take photos; send text messages;
 maybe even double up as an mp3 player or a torch.

You could probably call the moon with your cell phone

Now let’s assume we zapped back in time a bit…

Let’s say you were in the phone store. To buy a cell phone (what
 else?) And let’s assume the salesman showed you a phone model that could only…um…take and make calls. Would you buy that phone? Or would you want to see another model, with..uh..more features?

It’s not that much different when customers buy into your services and products

They want the whole jangbangdoowahwholeshebang

. They know they can’t use all the features you offer in your
 service or product. But it doesn’t matter one itty-bit to a customer. And herein slips in the paradox of choice.

Customers want it all, when buying a product/service, and yet are appalled, even intimidated by the post-purchase scenario.

So how does the post-purchase scenario roll out?

 Let’s take an example, shall we? Customers buy a program like Photoshop for its myriad features. Then end up using just a few
 tools. They buy a VCR or DVD recorder that dances, prances, and
 schmances. But they use just the basic functions. And yes, just
 like you, they go for the cell phone that has the most tantalising features, but end up using a few, if any.

Ok so we’re a greedy race, but how does that make a difference to your marketing?

It’s the intimidation factor of choice

. We like to schmooze with the concept of ‘more for less’, but when we get more, we actually gulp. We don’t know where to start.

What to do.

Where to go.

And this is why you need to roll out two distinct steps to make the intimidation of choice go away.

Step One: Load up the wagons

. When you’re selling a product, don’t hold back. In your sales pitch, load up every single benefit and feature you can think of. Pull out every single bonus out of your bag. Stack the stuff high, if you know what I mean.

The customer will see what you’re offering. She’ll drool a bit. Her brain cells will go boppity-bop, and if the offer is just right, she’ll buy.

Which brings us to Step Two.

Step Two: Only show the customer the good stuff. 

Take step one. Strip out all the lah-dee-dah, and you have Step Two. In effect, in Step Two, you’re out to make darned sure the customer feels the least amount of intimidation possible. So your post-purchase note or instructions should stress only on the most important features.

Doesn’t make sense does it?

 But look at you when you go to a buffet.

Logically, ten thousand
 calories of over-eating shouldn’t make you happy. But your greed
 is a happy-chappie, and pulls you along to this smorgasbord of
 food. So you pay your pile of pesos, and in you go.

About five minutes later, you don’t know where to start.

Should you attack the lamb chops? Should you savour the pasta?
 Should you even bother with the salad? Should you? Should you?
 Should you?

Now imagine if there was a sign that said: Chef’s
 recommendations.

Hmmm, what a helpful sign that would be, huh?

It’s no different if you have a product or service

. If you’re in consulting, the client wants the lamb chops on top of the pasta, with turkey and asparagus toppings of your service. Well, sell the darn thing to her. But once she’s in the system, only concentrate on two or three of the most important
 parts of your service. 

The parts that helps the client see an instant growth in income,
 or customers or whatever.

It’s the same if you’re selling a product

. Every product is bundled up with gizmos from here to the North Pole, but eventually what the client really wants to know, are the
 two or three most important things about your product.

Or in other words: The chef’s recommendations.

How does this work in real life?



Let’s see some examples shall we? 
1) Car Mechanic: You offer the works. You do the works when
 you’re servicing the car, but only point out the main two-three
 things when the client comes up to pick the car.
2) Web Designer: You offer a web site that can do it all. Yet on
 completion, you show the client the most important features to
 get the web site up and running.


3) Subscription or Membership: You offer all the bloo-blah before sign up. Then show the new member only what’s important to move around the ‘club’.

So does that mean you get rid of all the fancy features and benefits? 



No you don’t. If I’ve been promised the earth, I pretty much want the darned thing. You’re still delivering all you promised,
 plus the cherry on top. But to aid consumption of your productor service, you need to reduce the intimidation way down, by
 stressing only what’s important.

The biggest problem a business faces isn’t one of attraction. 

It’s one of consumption. Because as humans, we like small bites.
 You and I are greedy you-know-whats when we’re in the purchase mode. 

In fact, in most cases, we don’t even know what we’re buying. We’re just happy that it’s all bundled as part of our purchase. The scary part comes a little later, when we have to actually consume the darned thing.

That’s when you step in. And reduce the choice.

Yes, I bought because you were offering me more. But now that
 I’ve bought, make sure you show me less.

That way I can make my call on my cell phone without wondering about how to call the moon.

P.S. Do you have a question or comment? Write it here and I will respond.

Product Offers: Links you should visit


“I wasn’t sure Sean would have anything new to say or would offer
advice that would be easy to apply.

brainaudit_book1

I was also concerned that I would be deluged with a lot of information and sales pitches that I would get overwhelmed and not be able to implement anything.

But after I checked out his site I was impressed by all the free offerings. And it seemed so well organized I didn’t feel overwhelmed or confused. I tried a few ideas out and was so happy with the positive results that I bought the Brain Audit.

After reading (and re-reading!) the Brain Audit I felt like a blindfold had been lifted off my eyes. It made so much sense and I kept thinking how it seems so obvious but no one has ever put all the pieces together like this before.

I am happily communicating with patients much better, and attracting more of my ideal type of patient.

So if you want to break through to get better results and are willing to do a little painless work, then do yourself a favor and get the Brain Audit.

Tyme Gigliotti, Licensed Acupuncturist
Baltimore, MD, USA
Read more at http://www.psychotactics.com/brainaudit


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