How To Quickly Get Customers To Consume Your Report (And Come Back For More)

Creating Reports

Ever watched a marathon on TV?

Yup, I thought so. It’s painful watching while all those folks make their way through the bay, over the bridge and finally to their destination. Instead it’s much easier to watch the 100 metre sprint. It starts, and they’re off. And then 9 second later, there’s a finish line in sight.

Your report needs to be like a sprint, not a marathon. And there’s a reason why.

When customers come to your website for the first time, it’s likely that you’ll entice them with a report

It’s also quite likely that they’ll sign up for that report, or read it online (depending on how you deliver the report). And while you can get fascinating reports of marathon-length, remember that this report is almost like a first impression.

>If you spend way too much time labouring over the details, the customer may never get to the end. And the goal of this report—among all other reports—is to get the customer to the end; to get the customer to consume it completely.

So ideally your report should be as long as an article

You’ll be surprised to know that a 800-1000 word article spreads out nicely across a PDF. Put in a few graphics, a few callouts, an introduction and you have a report that’s extremely consumable, and nicely presented too. The reason for this is that your report is just an hors d’ouevre, a starter as it were. You don’t want to deliver an entire meal, you just want to get the client hungry for more.

In our membership site at 5000bc, we may do a report on bonuses, for example

That report may be almost 40-50 pages long. That’s fine when the customer is familiar with your work and is more than keen to read your mini-book. When the customer first gets to the Psychotactics site, they get the Headline report—and that was originally an article, which was turned into a report. It’s short, to the point and that’s what you really want to give the customer the first time around.

This doesn’t mean that your report needs to be incomplete. It just needs to be short, and complete. Which of course takes us to the second point: the need for action.

So why does a report need to be action-oriented?

At Psychotactics, we have lots of concepts like consumption, target profile etc. Notice then how the report doesn’t take on any of these “esoteric” topics. Instead it stays with something easily understood (in this case, “headlines”). But what’s also important is that the headline report has three core steps. You start at Point A, bounce over to Point B and by Point C, you’re done.

Within three core points, the customer is able to figure out a change in the way they perceive, and will write headlines in the future. This is not some theory of the universe in a report. It’s a simple method of “here are three mistakes, here’s how you spot them and voilà, let’s fix them”. The moment the customer is able to go from Point A to C in about 5 minutes, she’s hooked. Now she wants more.

Most well-designed “reports” are built this way

For instance, if you go onto the Rosetta Stone site, you’re invited to do a small test. In a few minutes you realise you can speak and understand bits of a foreign language. What really gets your attention is the state change and how you go from beginner to “pro” in a few minutes. And the same applies to the report. Give them something they can use, and use right away.

Oh, this brings us to the third point: mistakes!

We covered this in the second section didn’t we? But here goes again. When you’re reading the Headline report, you get shown the wrong headline and then the right one. In effect, the report is training you to see the mistake.

This mistake form of learning is very important no matter whether you’re talking about headlines, baking cakes or selling homes. You need to empower the reader so that they can quickly spot the mistake, and then fix it themselves.

Often reports don’t do this empowerment stuff

They blah-blah on instead of simply empowering the customer. And no matter what your business, you’ll have three things that make you shake your head in frustration every single time. You see people making these mistakes and a little tweak could fix those mistakes.

So yes, put in the mistakes and let your customers recognise the mistakes. Then show them how to fix it. The moment they can fix it, they feel a greater sense of pride and achievement.

So when we look at the Rosetta Stone site, they get all the points right

1: The sample is a short length. No long-winded nonsense.

2: It’s very action oriented. You learn quickly from the words and pronunciation causing you to feel empowered.

3: It also shows you where you make a mistake. And how to fix it.

If you examine the Headlines Report, you’ll find (not surprisingly) that it gets all these points right as well.

rosettastone_report1

Notice how short it is? Just seven points that would take you a few minutes at best.

rosettastone_report2

It’s action oriented. You start getting things right almost immediately.

rosettastone_report3

You also have the ability to make mistakes. And that’s very powerful and often something that we tend to leave out. Mistakes are amazing motivators once we know how to spot and then fix them.

But do you have to write a short report? Won’t a long one impress?

Yes a long one will impress, but remember that the goal is consumption. It’s easier for a new customer to take a smaller bite and then keep them coming back for more than a situation where they fully intend to complete reading your report, but don’t. The consumption factor is important, because the moment you consume and like what you’ve consumed, you feel the need for more. So ideally keep your report article-length (about 800-1000 words), keep it action-oriented and show the client a few mistakes and help them fix it all by themselves.

Marathons are as powerful as the 100 metre sprint

But there’s a time for a marathon and a time for the sprint.

With the report, use the sprint.


Next Step: Links you should visit

1) 7 vivid and clear steps that anyone can use to make their own marketing more compelling

2)  How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines


Top Selling Products Under $50

Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done

New! Critical Website Components: How to write compelling content for your key web pages
Free! Excerpt of The Brain Audit: Why Clients Buy And Why They Don’t 



Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room-without turning anyone off?

Online Membership Website: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


Next Step: To get more Psychological Tactics
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Four Ways To Guarantee The Attention of Strategic Alliances

attention strategic alliances

It must have been the year 2000.

I was just starting out in marketing and this well-known speaker/author, Brian Tracy was visiting Auckland. There I was, just one face in about 300 at that event. But I had an advantage. I’d bought a ton of Brian’s stuff–his CDs, cassettes (yes, cassettes) and books. And there I was with a stack of them, asking him to autograph the lot. Do you think he paid attention?

Of course he did.

I was just a rookie, but did that matter? No, it didn’t and it still doesn’t. If you want to get the attention of a strategic alliance, there are many ways to work your way through the crowds. But about the four best ways to guarantee the attention of a strategic alliance are these:

1) Buy product

2) Comments

3) Meet at an event

4) Promote to your audience

1) Let’s start with “buying a product”…

Nothing will get the attention of a strategic alliance faster and more effectively than if you buy their product. If you haven’t bought their product, you’re effectively an outsider. You don’t know who they are, what they stand for and are just seeking to get their attention. But the moment you’ve got their product, you’ve got a toe in the door—and especially if it’s a decent amount of product. The moment you start your correspondence with that person, you’ve got their attention.

Talking about a person’s product is like talking about their “baby”

You can’t quite say enough. They want to hear from you and are grateful that you’re paying attention. And it’s not just attention, but that you’ve spent your hard-earned dollars on their product. Compare this with some crazy email that shows up in your box where the person hasn’t really bought anything from you, and is spouting a whole lot of theories. In almost every situation, that email will be deleted in seconds.

So yeah, buy into some product—then get in touch.  But as you’d guess, product isn’t the only way to make contacts. Comments help too.

2) How comments work

In the pre-Internet world, to get in touch with just about anyone was reasonably hard. Not so, any more. Almost everyone is connected and they have some sort of blog or newsletter—if not a forum. If you want to get the attention of the strategic alliance, get on that conversation and leave comments. You may think that no one pays attention, but they do.

Even if you’re leaving comments on Facebook, they pay attention. At first, you’re just someone in a sea of people, but if you stick to the commenting, you get their attention.

And yet, the whole blog phenomenon is on the verge of dying. Back in the age of 2005-2013, blogs still had a ton of comments. Not so, any more. And it’s not uncommon to see blogs actually shutting off the comments, simply because the conversation is so very sparse. This leaves you with other media.

Remember that you can indeed comment through email

You read someone’s newsletter and you don’t have to go their blog. You can comment right back on email. Or you can find out where they hang out. Is it on Twitter? Is it on Instagram? Or Facebook? Maybe some other place. Maybe they head to the local community centre.

If you’re keen, you’ll do your share of stalking. And if you comment, and comment, and comment, you’ll get their attention. Of course you can’t be a pest. This isn’t about taking away their spotlight, but actually adding to it.

Comments can be of a varying nature

Some can be agreeable—even praise. Praise is always nice. But don’t just stick to praise. Comments that are challenging, work as well. Put in a bit of thought in your comment and you’ll find that people aren’t always looking for praise.

And there are comments that completely flog the status quo. In such a situation you’re actually getting the attention by saying the material is flawed. And this too, weird as it may seem, will get their attention as long as you have a solid argument to back up your train of thought.

The key to comments is that they can’t be one here and one there. You have to be consistent, just like paparazzi. Show up, and comment. Sooner or later—sooner, actually—you’ll get noticed. And this takes us to the third technique: live events.

3) So how do live events help?

There are two types of live events. One is a seminar sort of live event. In such a scenario, you get speaker after speaker all off on different tangents. And then you get a workshop, where you learn one skill and learn it well. So why would you go to a seminar to hear two dozen speakers when most of the time you can listen to the same thing at home?

The answer is: networking.

At events, you often get the chance to meet with others

These could be fellow-participants, but also the speakers themselves. You may think that speakers are not within your reach, but they really are. Again it helps to have read their material or bought their product at some point. That puts you in a direct line to the speaker.

Remember the Brian Tracy scenario? I didn’t know Brian at all. So what introduced me to Brian? I had his products in my hand, and he sure recognised those products. Even if it’s an ebook or a report—print it out and get the speaker to sign it. It’s your doorway to a whole new world, where you can reach speakers who you’d never be able to reach before.

Networking is one of the biggest reasons why people go to seminars. And granted, you have to be a bit bold to approach a speaker. But do it. Use the product you have in your hand and step up and get the speaker to sign the product.

Then get into a natural conversation, or just comment on their speech, their product or anything else. Now you’ve created a link and it’s just a matter of asking if you can keep in touch. Usually the speaker will give you a card or some contact details. When you get back, yup, get in touch. And this slides us to the fourth method.

4) Offer to promote their product/service to your audience

It doesn’t matter how big or small you are, the moment you offer to promote someone else’s product or service to your audience, they’re interested. You can do this in many ways. I tend to do interviews, because we don’t tend to do any joint ventures. But you can do a joint venture or just promote the product/service to your audience.

But there’s a mistake that a lot of folks make at this stage

They promote just about anything. You have to be careful about promoting anything at all. You may think you can’t check everyone’s work, but let’s face it: Would you heartily recommend a movie you haven’t watched? Would you go on and on promoting a restaurant you’ve never ever visited? Would you refer a business to a friend, when you’ve never actually dealt with that business?

So if you’re going to offer to promote someone else’s products, you jolly well make the time to read their information. I do. I will read the entire book, go through the entire course if I have to. There’s no way on earth I’m going to recommend something if I’m not 100% sure of it myself. And you should do the same. Due diligence is hard work, but it helps, because the honesty comes out both in the transaction with your clients and with your strategic alliance.

But are there other ways to get the attention of strategic alliances?

Yes, there would be. You can send them a cake every day until they beg you to stop. But hey, you don’t want to go crazy. Use any or all of these four methods: buying product, meeting at an event, commenting or promoting to your audience, and you’ll have your hands full.

Getting the attention of alliances is not difficult.

But you have to start today.


Next Step: Links you should visit

1) 7 vivid and clear steps that anyone can use to make their own marketing more compelling

2)  How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines


Top Selling Products Under $50

Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done

New! Critical Website Components: How to write compelling content for your key web pages
Free! Excerpt of The Brain Audit: Why Clients Buy And Why They Don’t 



Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room-without turning anyone off?

Online Membership Website: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


Next Step: To get more Psychological Tactics
Subscribe: :
Get Updates via RSS | Get Updates via Email

 


How to get a FREE 30-Page Excerpt of The Brain Audit (Without Even Needing To Fill A Form)

 

If you’ve always wondered what The Brain Audit was all about.
Or if you’ve ever wondered what’s in this book that’s caused thousands of businesses to “sell without selling”, then here’s away to stop wondering.

 

Because you can get a chunky 30 page excerpt of The Brain Audit.
And it’s free. You’ll enjoy the cartoons. You’ll enjoy the way The Brain Audit holds your attention. And you’ll learn a lot–even in just 30 pages.

 

No catches. Not even a darned form to fill.
But let me not yada, yada. Here you go.

 

Warm regards from Auckland
Sean

Special Offer: Website Components-How To Create Compelling Pages On Your Website + Special Bonus (Valued at $45)


When you buy Website Components-How To Create Compelling Pages On Your Website on the  25th, 26th, 27th or 28th December 2013, you’ll also get–’How  To Maximise The Power Of Bonuses’ (worth $45) absolutely free.


Website Secrets Special

Do you often wonder if your home page, about us page or client
acquisition page is working at less than its full potential? These
three pages are critical to any website, and yet we often put the
content together on these pages hurriedly.

Well, “hurriedly” is the wrong word to use.
Instead we spend hours trying to get just the right content; just
the right look. And then, after hours, maybe days of frustration,
we put together something that seems right.

But is it really compelling?
Can it be more compelling?
What’s really missing? And is there a simple way to fix it–while
retaining your own voice, your own personality?

Introducing: The Website Component Series
Find out for yourself how you can spruce up the home page, about us
page and the sign up page. We deconstruct existing pages and then
in true Psychotactics-fashion reconstruct them step-by-step.

And the Special Bonus: How To Maximise The Power Of Bonuses
In this 40 page booklet you will learn
- The Psychology of Bonuses
- How to Find your Bonuses
- How to Create a One-Of-A-Kind Bonus
- How to Avoid the Bonus Trap
- Why Unbundling Makes a Big Difference to How your Product is Perceived.
- And more…

Judge for yourself at: http://www.psychotactics.com/website-secrets

Warm regards,
s-
P.S. This product is very critical if you’re just sitting down to
write your pages, but it’s even more critical if you have these
pages up, and you’ll like to improve them to help you convert more traffic.
Judge for yourself at: http://www.psychotactics.com/website-secrets

P.P.S. This special offer is only valid until 28th December 2013. Have a look
and make a decision based on what you read.
http://www.psychotactics.com/website-secrets


Announcing: A book on how to build an online community—even if you have a very small list


Here’s an interesting fact.
In fact more than one interesting fact.

Fact 1: Why our community earns us between 90-95% of our income
At 5000bc, we have had a community since 2003.But that’s not the interesting part. The interesting part is that we earn between 90-95% of our income from that community. And no, it’s not because we charge a huge membership fee. In fact, it’s very modest at just $259 a year.

But even that’s not the most interesting part. The most interesting part is that we don’t have thousands of members.

Fact No 2: We have pretty small membership numbers
Amazingly, we have just 450 members–despite being around 10 years.

And yet, these 450 members show up to all our online courses, our live workshops, buy a ton of our products. Often, you can’t even get on a course, because the members have taken every seat in less than an hour.

So why does this information make a difference to you?
It shows you how you can start up your membership site with just a few members. And grow it from there.

We had humble beginnings
And we failed repeatedly–losing members 50% at a time.

That doesn’t happen any more
10 years have taught us to not just run a community, but let the community run itself as well.

And that’s what this announcement is all about.

Announcing a book on how to create your online community
It’s not a book about search and destroy.
It’s not a book about trying to maximise returns.
It’s not a book about trying to set up stuff overnight.
Instead it’s a book called: Be Kind, Be Helpful or Begone. And it’s about building a warm, respectful and profitable community.

What’s more is that you don’t have to have a ton of folks
But I’ll let you read one of the testimonials as they trickle in.(Yes, it’s a trickle because the book has just been released and without all the hoopla).

Here’s what Wyn Snow has to say:
“As a person with limited financial resources, I always stop and think before spending more than $15 in one sitting.”

“My concern was: Will I find effective strategies for building a profitable membership site for fiction writers? I’d bought other products of Sean’s before and I was pretty confident the answer would be yes, so I went ahead and plunked down my cash. And was not disappointed.

Sean’s insights into the ingredients that build an online community were ideas I had never encountered before, not even in Sean’s other writings. I found concepts he gleaned from his experience with 5000bc that I know I can adapt to the clients I have in mind. He also answered one of my biggest concerns in getting started: I basically have NO starting “list” of people to approach for membership.

What I liked best about Sean’s Build an Online Community Membership Site book (aside from the cartoons) was the depth of his insight into why people join, leave, or stay — and the strategies that encourage them not only to join, but to PARTICIPATE and stay.

Several other great features were the illustrations — screen shots of the forums on 5000bc — and his honesty about mistakes he made along the way, plus sharing how the site started from very humble beginnings and has grown along the way.

I often recommend Sean’s website, articles and books to others because of his insight into the human nature, and why we do or don’t buy various things. And I also enjoy his quirky sense of humor (though his recipes are, I confess, too spicy for my palate)”.

So there you have it.
It’s not a cheap book. But you’ll see when you read it, that it will rock your world. Better still, it will get you started, sooner than later.

So go ahead, have a look and judge for yourself.
http://psychotactics.com/products/membership-site-strategy

Warm regards from Auckland

Sean

Announcing: How To Create Compelling Pages On Your Website- Critical Website Components Series

Do you often wonder if your home page, about us page or client
acquisition page is working at less than its full potential? These
three pages are critical to any website, and yet we often put the

content together on these pages hurriedly.

This is what Philip Riggs has to say about one of the books
in this series

“Would a person really need a whole book on home
page design?”

“Most websites put up some text about what the website is about, or
maybe some photos of products or services. It’s pretty simple to

set up a simple home page.

But I’ve been to too many of these websites that were so confusing
I didn’t know what to do. That was exactly what I didn’t want. And
while there are plenty of books on how to design the appearance of
a website, I wanted something that showed me how to design for

usability.

I didn’t realize how easy it is to make a home page confusing. I
also never thought about text-heavy home pages versus

graphics-heavy home pages.

The booklet shows three methods to make a website clear for a
customer to find what they need. And the three methods are easy to
understand and implement. They are presented very clearly and
supported with lots of examples to help the learner apply the

methods.

I would recommend this product to anyone who wants to better
understand how to design a solid home page that helps customers

find their way around and do what you want them to do.”

Philip Riggs
Fort Collins, USA


Introducing: Critical Website Component Series
Find out for yourself how you can spruce up the home page, about us
page and the sign up page. We deconstruct existing pages and then
in true Psychotactics-fashion reconstruct them step-by-step.

It’s now at a special introductory price. So have a look
right away.
http://www.psychotactics.com/website-secrets

Warm regards,
s-
P.S. Here is what Matthew Parker has to say about one
of the books

Here are three reasons why you should invest in this
book: ‘About Us’

 - You’ll be able to read it quickly.
 - All the suggestions are really clear.
 - It’s easy to implement the advice.
I would recommend this book to you no matter what kind of company run.
You’ll be surprised  how much you can benefit from it.”

 

Matthew Parker
Profitable Print Relationships, 
Wiltshire, UK

It’s now at a special introductory price. So have a look
right away.
http://www.psychotactics.com/website-secrets

 


Announcing: Critical Website Components-How To Create Compelling Pages On Your Website

Do you often wonder if your home page, about us page or client
acquisition page is working at less than its full potential? These
three pages are critical to any website, and yet we often put the
content together on these pages hurriedly.

Well, “hurriedly” is the wrong word to use.
Instead we spend hours trying to get just the right content; just
the right look. And then, after hours, maybe days of frustration,
we put together something that seems right.

But is it really compelling?
Can it be more compelling?
What’s really missing? And is there a simple way to fix it–while
retaining your own voice, your own personality?

Introducing: The Website Component Series
Find out for yourself how you can spruce up the home page, about us
page and the sign up page. We deconstruct existing pages and then
in true Psychotactics-fashion reconstruct them step-by-step.


It’s an introductory price.
So have a look right away.
http://www.psychotactics.com/website-secrets

Warm regards,
s-
P.S. This product is very critical if you’re just sitting down to
write your pages, but it’s even more critical if you have these
pages up, and you’ll like to improve them to help you convert more traffic.

 


Announcing: The Brain Audit Workshop—Amsterdam!

Brain Audit Workshop, Amsterdam 2013—Psychotactics
Yes, if it’s June, it must be Amsterdam!

And we’re planning on having The Brain Audit workshop in early June. So if you’re planning to enjoy a “summerish” couple of days in Amsterdam, this is your chance.

You could be local, or fly in–and stay a while in this wonderful country. Either way you’ll get two mind-blowing days of The Brain Audit.

But enough blah, blah. Look at the details on this page.
And I promise, you won’t be disappointed.
http://psychotactics.com/workshops/brain-audit-workshop-amsterdam

Warm regards,
s-


Why Creating “Document-Based Barriers” Is Critical For Your Business

Why Creating "Document-Based Barriers" Is Critical For Your Business

It was the year 2012. There we were in Washington DC doing a three-day workshop on Uniqueness.

And among the group of about 35 people, there was one person who was being disruptive. She casually interrupted the presentation to ask bizarre questions. She wouldn’t co-operate within the group. In short, this person was that pain-in-the-butt-client that you don’t want around. But you may want to stop and ask: Whose fault is it that this person showed up in the first place?

The surprising answer is: It’s your fault.

In this case it was our fault

No matter whether a client is doing any of our courses, or workshops or even membership to 5000bc, we insist on one thing. That they own (or have at least read a copy of The Brain Audit). And when you think about it, it seems senseless. What has The Brain Audit (for instance) got to do with an Article Writing Course? Or in this case, what does The Brain Audit have to do with the Uniqueness workshop? So we let it slide. We didn’t insist on the document-based barrier.

So what is a document-based barrier?

A book like The Brain Audit is a document. And when a client is required to read that document, as a prerequisite, that document becomes a barrier. It separates those who simply want to show up vs. those who are so motivated that they will read through an entire document (be it a book, or a video or a audio) just to be part of your event/course.

Document-Based Barriers are critical for at least two core reasons

1) They get rid of 95% of your audience
2) They help to forge a specific terminology

1) They get rid of 95% of your audience

The moment you put any barrier in place, it gets rid of about 95% of your audience. And only the most determined stick around. So for instance, when we say, you have to read The Brain Audit to attend a course, those who haven’t read The Brain Audit automatically disqualify themselves. And most folks will tell you that it’s a bad idea to get rid of such a huge chunk of your audience.

You should make it ‘easier, not harder’, you will be told. But in fact, getting rid 95% of your audience is a very good idea indeed. Because the 5% that remain are extremely motivated. The more motivated your audience, the higher the chances that they’ll achieve their goals, be cooperative and yes, not be disruptive.

2) They help to forge a specific terminology

Within any document you’ll find specific terms. In The Brain Audit for instance, you find terms like ‘roller coaster’ or ‘target profile’. And those who’ve read the document are aware of the context of the words and the importance as well. And so it enables them to work together more effectively. When you get someone who hasn’t read the document, you get disruption.

They don’t understand the concepts or the context, and will constantly be seeking clarification. This is extremely annoying to those who are in the know. And it sucks up precious time as well. So yes, having the document (and having specific terminology) alienates a large part of your audience, but unites the audience that most care about you and that you most care about.

But surely it’s OK for me to tell you to put a barrier in place, now that our business is well on its way…

In fact, the opposite is true. Way back in 2002, when we first wrote The Brain Audit, it formed the basis of the barrier. When we started 5000bc.com (our membership site) in 2003, we had very few members, but that didn’t stop us from putting the barrier in place. And since then, almost every course and workshop has required a reading of The Brain Audit.

So it’s not that we just made it up recently. It’s been there from the very start. And it seems illogical, doesn’t it?

Logic will tell you that you need to appeal to the widest possible audience. Friends and advisers will tell you that you need to appeal to the widest possible audience.

Ignore them

Put a document barrier in place.
And you’ll get a better class of customer. More cooperation and amazing results.

And best of all, it will keep the disinterested and the pain-in-the-butt clients away!

P.S. Do you have a qualifying process in your business? Tell us about it.

Why You Need The Brain Audit


“I purchased The Brain Audit and have increased my clientele two-fold.”

brainaudit_book1

As a Results Coach, I am always looking for ways to up my own game and provide more value for my clients. I came across some promotional material for the Brain Audit and was impressed almost immediately! I started reading through Sean’s PsychoTactics material and was even more impressed.

His conversational approach, his practical strategies that WORK, and his dedication to making marketing and customer attraction easier and more understandable make me not only a customer but a fan!

I purchased The Brain Audit and have increased my clientele two-fold. Buy The Brain Audit…Read it…Apply the principles…Watch your business grow!

Sean is a breath of fresh air. His strategies, principles, and advice work! I highly recommend The Brain Audit.

Dawn Langerock ~ Results Expert and Coach
Synergy Coaching and Consulting, Austin, TX, USA

Read more at http://www.psychotactics.com/brainaudit


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) Don’t Miss! You already know that 80% of a sales letter depends on your headline.
So what’s the remaining 20% that causes customers to buy? Find out more

2) Do You Often Hit A Wall Called ‘Writers Block’?
Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

3) Do you know that visuals immediately improve your sales conversion?
Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

4) Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

5) Chaos Planning
Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly it’s January, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.


Black Belt Presentations: How do you create presentations that enthrall, hold and move an audience to action?



Next Step: To get more Psychological Tactics
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The Importance of Alumni: How They Create A Safe Zone To Your Courses

The Importance of Alumni: How They Create A Safe Zone To Your Courses

On May 5, 1954, no human had ever run the four-minute mile

Then May 6 dawned.  And at an athletic meet watched by 3000 spectators, Roger Bannister ran the mile in 3 minutes and 59.4 seconds. Just 46 days later, that record was decimated by a whole second by Roger’s rival, Landy.  Today that barrier has been lowered by a chunky 17 seconds. What seemed impossible at the time, is now considered not just doable, but doable with great poise and confidence.

The alumni creates exactly the same factor for your course: They show how doable it is

When you start up a course, you do your best to make it as easy as possible to achieve. And it’s more than likely that you want to get this message of ease across to the course participants. But they don’t see it that way at all. Often they see you as the maestro, the person they hope to be, sometime in the future.

But at least at the start of the course, there’s a huge mismatch. Despite their best intentions and bravado, the participants can’t see themselves replicating what you do. But the alumni prove that they’ve broken the four-minute barrier. And they create an atmosphere and end point that any new participant can envision. And in doing so, they create a series of winners for you—all breaking the four-minute barrier.

But the usefulness of the alumni doesn’t stop there.

They’re critical in creating a safe zone, and they do so in many ways:

1) They tackle the questions that may seem ‘too hard to ask’

2) Smoothening out the bumpy logistical issues

2) They share their experiences in great detail.

1) Tackling the questions that may seem ‘too hard to ask’

When a person just begins a course, they feel a great deal of intimidation. You may do all you can to get them to relax, but they’re clearly out of their comfort zone. And the alumni helps them relax. Now, instead of having to deal with you, the head honcho; the big shot, the new participants may prefer to deal with the alumni instead.

While they may hesitate to ask you questions, they find it a lot less intimidating to ask the alumni the very same questions. This gets the new participants relaxed and this relaxation is very important. If the participants feel agitated, it creates a big barrier to their learning. Once that wall is down, they can actually let their hair down, have fun and speed up their learning.

If that’s all the alumni did, they’d be super-useful, but it doesn’t stop there. The logistical issues can bury a newcomer. And the alumni does a lot to smoothen out the bumps.

2) Smoothening out the bumpy logistical issues

Let’s take the Psychotactics cartooning course, for instance. Part of the course requires you to post your cartoon online and link it back to the forum (ah, your eyes are glazing over already, aren’t they?)

Well, when you’re a newcomer on the course, it’s more than just the logistical issues that bug you. You may have logistical issues AND you may be opposed to posting online OR not want to do this, or do that. Usually someone in the alumni has gone through the same logical nightmare and trepidation (big word for ‘bubbling fear’) as you. When they describe what they did, and how they resolved the issues, you know you can do it too.

And of course, all issues can’t be covered. There’s always something that’s missing

But that’s where the Ask Alumni section comes in. If you have a place to Ask Alumni, you know you can always fire away, and get a response. It’s always a lot harder to deal with the head honcho (that’s you, who’s holding the course) because you may feel you’re interrupting, or that your questions are too silly. But it’s not that hard to ask Alumni.

What’s also interesting, is that these issues come out only right at the start of a course. Once a week or two has passed, everyone’s mostly settled in. Which also brings up an interesting point: Participants need to be comfortable BEFORE the course, not get flustered during the course. So it’s important to get them to interact for a week or two BEFORE the course begins.

That way all the issues (logistical or otherwise, can be ironed out) long before the course rockets away. With the questions out of the way, it’s time for the third biggie: sharing their experiences.

3) They share their experiences in great detail

The experiences of the alumni are critical for one reason alone: Every one of their experiences are utterly unique. Yes, some experiences may overlap, but there’s still a massive factor of uniqueness about every single one of them. On the Article Writing Course, for instance, one person wrote about how she overcame years of bullying and how the course helped her. Another talked about how his speed cartoons amazed a child on the train.

All of these experiences pop up, in strange and wonderful ways. But the struggle comes through as well. When the alumni add their joys, struggles and how they battled with resistance, the incoming batch know they’re dealing with people just like themselves. It’s very, very hard for a newbie to identify with the maestro, no matter how similar the experience, but with alumni it’s a lot easier.

And that’s because the alumni are folks who’ve just been part of the previous batch. Just three, six or twelve months ago, they were where the incoming group sat. And so the experiences become real.

But the problem does arise…

What if you don’t have alumni? What if you’re doing a course for the first time? Or what if you’re doing a course after a longish period? We have the very same issues at Psychotactics. In 2012, we were nudged by a client to conduct the Headlines course. We hadn’t done that course since 2010, and even if we did round up the alumni, the gap between the two courses would have been to vast to remember details. So there was no alumni to advise the incoming group. And this is the case if you’re doing a course for the first time as well.

And in this case, you can’t do much this time around, but you must then put it in your system to train the new course members to be alumni. The way to do this is to get them through the course and then right at the end for them to post advice for the next batch. Yes, the next batch may be a year or two years away, but it doesn’t matter.

The fact that the advice is already in place enables you to then port the advice over, so that the next batch gets the warm, comforting effect as they settle in. And because the alumni have given advice, they’re also keen to come back and help, but only provided you make your expectations clear, even as the course is in progress.

Alumni are almost never considered when training a group

Yet they are extremely useful to get the raw edginess out of the way. They help with logistical issues. And they share their experiences. In short, they become part of your team. They’re helping you, creating a sense of volunteerism and camaraderie. Over time, you’ll find that alumni relish this chance to pitch in and help. It’s up to you to give them this opportunity.

And all of these steps make a course more doable

At Psychotactics, some of our courses like the cartooning course are fun, yet require discipline. Other courses like the Article Writing Course is billed as the Toughest Writing Course in the World. And yet, as alumni play their role, we see 80-90% get to the finish line, despite the odds. And the reason they know they can get there is because of the alumni.

The alumni is the four-minute mile. And your incoming group knows they too, can do just the same—or even better.

P.S. Do you have a question or comment? Write it here and I will respond.

Why You Need The Brain Audit


“The first thing I noticed was that the ‘Brain Audit’ had 68 reviews with a five- star rating. And here’s the thing: they weren’t canned, they were the real thing.”

The Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy And Why they Don't

“The first time I heard about the ‘Brain Audit’ is when I was trying to learn something about ‘Why People Buy’. So then I googled ‘marketing’ and the results were staggering. I kept at it for hours until I finally happened on the ‘Brain Audit’

What I got was that The Brain Audit book was basically a story about seven red bags that explained marketing in a simple yet carefully structured way that anyone could understand. It didn’t seem possible. But how was I to argue with 68 people? So I bought the book.Then I read it in one sitting (took me about four hours). And it was everything they (the 68) said it was.

What I did after reading the book was to apply it to just about everything I saw on TV, magazines, and info-memorials and on. After a while it gets a little weird looking at a commercial and saying to yourself….mmmm…pretty good, but why didn’t they cover the hidden risk?

It really needs some risk reversal. Or why didn’t they cover more objections? They left themselves vulnerable. And that’s the way they set up the testimonials? The six questions on page 89 would’ve worked perfectly there…plus, they’re one bag short.”

See what I mean? It gets too you.
Read the book, you’ll see what I mean. It’ll get to you too.”

Marty Shea, San Jose, CA

Read how The Brain Audit can help you
http://www.psychotactics.com/brainaudit


Products Under $50


1) Announcing! How To Put That Zing-Kapow In Your Articles (With StoryTelling)
So what are the elements of a well-told story? And why have they been playing hide and seek with
us for so long?

2) You already know that 80% of a sales letter depends on your headline.
So what’s the remaining 20% that causes customers to buy? Find out more

3) Do You Often Hit A Wall Called ‘Writers Block’?
Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

4) Do you know that visuals immediately improve your sales conversion?
Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

5) Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

6) Chaos Planning
Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly half the year is over, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.


Black Belt Presentations
How to create presentations that enthral, hold and move an audience to action.



Next Step: To get more Psychological Tactics
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Why “Tying Shoelaces” Get Better Results When Training Clients Online

Why "Tying Shoelaces" Get Better Results When Training Clients Online

You may have never heard of John Wooden.

He was a coach. And a darned good one too.

In a space of 12 seasons, he won 10 championships with U.C.L.A, putting him in an orbit all of his own. John Wooden holds the amazing record for national championships in men’s basketball at ten. The next closest “competitors” are a couple of coaches who only managed a “paltry” four championships each.

But John Wooden had a strange starting point to his coaching system

At the start of every season, he taught every basketball player on his team to tie their shoelaces.

Shoelaces?

Surely there were better things to learn than tying shoelaces. But Wooden did it every year. And he had a reason why he went through this seemingly mindless routine. “Badly tied laces lead to blisters”, he would say. “And well tied laces mean you don’t easily get sprained ankles”.

When training clients online (or even offline) you may run into similar trouble…

Clients don’t always tie their “laces” well. And then when your course is supposed to be zooming around, a couple are moving slowly because of “sprained ankles”. On a course, this could be a sprain from a client not understanding how to use a forum, or some technology. Or not paying attention to some instructions.

And your due diligence doesn’t matter

John Wooden wasn’t sloppy. He’d take great care to pass out a sheet of paper. His players would joke about them, and make paper airplanes with them. And that’s a lot what happens with you. You may create an elaborate system of getting your participants ready for a course. Yet, they’re busy with their lives, not paying attention to your plan. And why should they? It’s not their plan.

So when they’re on your court, you get them to tie their shoelaces…

Like for instance, we have a routine of tying shoelaces on the cartooning course. The first week we don’t do any drawing. We go through the steps of introducing ourselves, talking about our success and failure in drawing. We go through alumni posts, learn how to link pictures to Facebook (or other online hosting services). We make sure that participants order (or buy) a book. And then to round off the week, they watch some videos and read the overview of the course again.

It may seem like a mindless exercise, but it’s not

It does a few things right off the bat

1) It makes sure that everyone’s on the same page.
2) It creates a safe zone.
3) It creates an aura of discipline (which is critical for learning any skill)

1) It makes sure that everyone’s on the same page

There are three types of people. Some who rush ahead no matter what the schedule. There are those who stay on schedule and those who show up just on time. The ones who got there early or on time may seem to be in a better position, and they probably are. But there’s also the chance of over-confidence.

I remember getting to Chicago airport several hours before we were required to be there. We were off to Barcelona on vacation and in there was no point sitting in the hotel. So we sat in the empty departure lounge. But we were so early that we were also complacent. You know what happened next, right?

No, we didn’t miss our flight, but we came within minutes of missing it. We grew suspicious when there were no other passengers at our departure gate with just 10 minutes to go. And that’s the problem with complacency, no matter when a participant shows up. So going through the routine make absolutely sure that everyone’s on the same page. Which takes us to point No.2: The safe zone.

2) It creates a safe zone

When participants show up in your zone, they’re always going to be slightly buzzed. This buzz comes partly from excitement, partly from a bit of intimidation. There are many things to do and learn before a course begins. And if you were to simply start up a course, there’s a pretty good chance that at least some folks are fumbling with hardware, software, or some instructions.

They all, we all, need some time to get settled in. And like a party, everyone shows up at their own convenience. And so it’s important to get everyone go through a routine. This of course, could be done before the course begins, but often it’s a better practice to do it when the course begins.

Yes, it’s eating up into course time, but that can be easily fixed by pushing the end of the course by the same duration. So if you start a week later because you spent the first week with tying laces, you can extend the course to a week later on the other end.

This safe zone ensures that almost all issues can be tackled so that everyone is comfy. Everyone can settle down with their favourite drink. And the party can begin—even though it’s a bit later.

But you have to wonder, won’t this make everyone impatient? Sure it will. And this is the third important point.

3) It creates an aura of discipline (which is critical for learning any skill)

Because of courses proliferating on the Internet, people are used to jumping in and out. Doing assignments (or not) as they feel like. This doesn’t work to their benefit. It causes the group to fail (if you’re doing group learning) and of course you become a lousy coach.

A coach is only as good as his/her players. And therefore the idea of discipline needs to be set in right from the start. Without discipline, skill acquisition is almost impossible, because without discipline you have chaos. Everyone does whatever they darned feel like, and that a demoralising situation to learn in.

Which is why John Wooden started with the shoelaces

It sent a clear message.
A message of everyone on the same page, the safe zone and discipline.

And that’s how you create winners

Most people think that winning is a result of sheer talent.
And it is.But talent is not inborn. It has to be learned and honed.

Start with shoelaces.

P.S. Do you have a question or comment? Write it here and I will respond.

Why You Need The Brain Audit


“I wasn’t sure the Brain Audit would be worth the money, but it has completely changed how we approach our advertising and web content.”

The Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy And Why they Don't

I found a link to Sean’s website on a site I trust (Before & After Magazine), and I signed up for the free document “Why Headlines Fail”. I began to look forward to the weekly emails because they were short, interesting and helpful.

I wasn’t sure the Brain Audit would be worth the money, but it has completely changed how we approach our advertising and web content. The Brain Audit is deceptively simple — it’s easy to read, and easy to comprehend — the cartoons help get across the ideas, and each chapter logically builds on the other.

And each time I pick it up, I’m struck by something I missed the last time.

Susan Nayak,
 Marketing Communications, Austin, TX USA

Read more about The Brain Audit
http://www.psychotactics.com/brainaudit


Products Under $50


1) NEW! How To Put That Zing-Kapow In Your Articles (With StoryTelling)
So what are the elements of a well-told story? And why have they been playing hide and seek with us for so long?

2) You already know that 80% of a sales letter depends on your headline.
So what’s the remaining 20% that causes customers to buy? Find out more

3) Do You Often Hit A Wall Called ‘Writers Block’?
Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

4) Do you know that visuals immediately improve your sales conversion?
Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

5) Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

6) Chaos Planning
Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly the year is nearly over, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.


Black Belt Presentations
How to create presentations that enthral, hold and move an audience to action.



Next Step: To get more Psychological Tactics
Subscribe: :
Get Updates via RSS | Get Updates via Email


Why Customers Choose The Higher Priced Product (More Than 95% of the time)

Why Customers Choose The Higher Priced Product (More Than 95% of the time)

Imagine you’re going to a workshop.

The price of the workshop is $700 (Let’s call this Option A). And then there’s a premium version of the workshop that’s priced at $770 (Let’s call this Option B). Which of the two options would you choose? The $700 or the $770 option?

I know, I know. You want more detail, right?

OK, here’s more detail. Option A and Option B are exactly the same. Identical in every respect. If you get cookies and muffins and 200 pages of notes for Option A, you get cookies and muffins and 200 pages of notes for Option B. There’s no difference at all. You get every darned thing you can think of, no matter which option you choose.

Now will you pay $700 or $770?

Seems like a ridiculous question, doesn’t it? And yet, would it surprise you to know that over 95%, and sometimes even 100% of our clients pay the higher price? Ah, now I’ve got your attention. And besides, you’re sure I’m hiding some detail from you. No one in their right mind would pay more for exactly the same thing.

And you’re right

It’s not exactly the same thing. The bonus tips the scales in favour of the Option B. Bonus? What bonus? Let’s go back to that workshop, shall we? Let’s say that for Option A, you got the workshop (with nothing held back). But for Option B, you got the workshop, as well as a special 2-week course implementing the elements of the workshop. And let’s say that 2-week course is priced at $500 (normally).

Immediately you do the math in your brain…

Option A = $700 (For the workshop)

Option B = $770 (But it’s not just the workshop. You get a course worth $500, and just for $70)

Now your brain is like a fried cutlet

It knows that $700 is the sensible option, but not the smart option. Because for just $70 more (that’s 10% more) you’re getting a follow up course worth $500. And even if you can’t do the math, you know for a fact that you’re getting more for less. A lot more, in fact.

So then it’s easy, right?

To entice the customer to choose Option B, all we need is a bonus. Let’s just find something that’s worth $500 and chuck it in.

In fact, taking the example of this workshop itself, let’s just say we pull out the $500 follow-up course and put in another option. Let’s say you removed the follow up course bonus and instead gave $500 worth of audio recording of the workshop.

Would 95% of your buyers still choose Option B? No, they wouldn’t. It would almost immediately slump to about 50%. And there’s a reason why. There are people who prefer to read, instead of listening to audio. And for them, they’re not getting $500 worth of goodies. Instead they’re paying $70 for no return. So they choose Option A instead, which is cheaper.

So what is the critical element that makes them choose Option B?

The element is “something so amazing, that it’s perceived to be almost better than the product or service itself”. Let me give you an example. Let’s say you’re having a course on cartooning (like we do at Psychotactics). And now you are offering two options.

Here are your choices

Option A = $689 for a 3-month course.

Option B=  $789 for a 3-month course + Composition methods that makes cartoons jump from the page + Learn Critical Photoshop techniques in 30 minutes

No choice, eh?

Correct. There is no choice. Because now your eyes aren’t tracking the 3-month course. Your eyes are tracking the bonuses. The bonuses seem more valuable than the product itself at this point in time. You probably already know that there are some things that mark out the experts from the average cartoonists (yup, that’s the composition methods). And you’ve struggled with the beast called Photoshop on occasion. And anything that would teach you to draw, and use Photoshop in a really intelligent way would be worth the kopeks you’re about to pay.

But it doesn’t stop there

Just listing the bonuses is a good idea. But you need to add two more things:

1) You need to put a value on the bonuses.
2) You need to explain WHY they’re important.

1) Value on the bonuses: Is the Photoshop technique section worth $25 or $150? That composition stuff you’re doing: Is it worth $20 or $250? If there’s no value, how would the customer know? But when there’s a value or price on it, it’s clear, because then they add up the price and realise—oh, this Option B is worth so much more. But it doesn’t stop there, either.

2) You need to explain WHY these bonuses are important: Is there any more detail about what Photoshop techniques you’ll cover? Is there any information on how much time I’ll save (even if I’m a competent Photoshop user?) And then what about the composition stuff? I’m not sure I want to learn composition, because it sounds ugh, like learning scales or learning tables in math class. And so, you need to explain.

In short, you’re treating the bonuses with a lot of care. You’re explaining, you’re putting value on them. If you can, you should be demonstrating your bonuses with a visual (online) and with boxes or graphics (in a live presentation).

Now Option B isn’t just Option B

It’s the most desirable option. It’s the option the customer must have at all costs. And most customers do. But the bonus needs to be desirable—and you have to make it yummy as heck. It can’t be something (like the audio recordings) that will be rejected outright by 50% of the audience. And it can’t be something that you just found on your desk and threw in as a bonus. You have to make that bonus a star. You have to really drive home the facts and the price/value.

In fact, here’s what I do in most cases

I start with the idea of the product, and then I write out the bullets. For instance, right now I listed all the things I’d cover in a series of books on Community-based membership sites.  And I listed the bullets. And then often, I’ll get clients to choose which are the most desirable elements.

Then I unbundle that element, and give it prominence of its own, often making sure that the bonus has enough clout to almost stand alone as a product of its own. Yes, you need make it that valuable.

But then, at other times, I’ll add on a bonus based on something I’ve created specially for the event or course or product. Or I’ll use something that I have in my archives that’s extremely desirable.

And here’s one way to know if your bonus is truly desirable

Take it away. Yes, take it away. Have you ever given an ice-cream cone to a child and then taken it away. Well do the same for your client. Show your client the product/service, and then list and explain the bonus.

Then take the bonus away.

Does the client throw a tantrum?

If so, that bonus is really desirable. So with the course above, the follow up course was really desirable. The Photoshop and composition techniques, ditto. When you take it away, the client must feel real loss.

So ask yourself:

1) Have I got desirable bonuses? Are they almost more desirable than the product or service itself?
2) Is the bonus such that about 50% of the audience may reject it for some reason?
3) Do I have a value listed on the bonus? Does that value seem more or less accurate or over the top?
4) Did I bother to explain why the bonus is important?
5) Did I have any additional images that show off the bonus?

If you answer yes to most of the above (si, you can get away with not having all, but it’s not ideal) then there’s no reason why the client won’t buy the higher priced product. In about 8 years of running this system of Option A and Option B, we’ve had 95% of clients who’ve chosen Option B (the more expensive option).

And with the most expensive purchases e.g. The Article Writing Course where the prices hover near the $3000 mark, the strike rate is 100%—yup, every single one chooses Option B.

That’s because clients aren’t idiots

They know value. But only if you explain it. And put a price tag on it. And when you do, you get outstanding results.

Only 95-100% of the time!
P.S. Do you have a story on how clients choose higher prices? Share it here. If you have a question, I will answer it here.

Why You Need The Brain Audit


“What do your customers think? What would make them buy?”

The Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy And Why they Don't

In the Brain Audit – Sean teaches 7 steps on how to form killer communication pieces that makes people buy from you.

The Brain Audit is a simple psychological system that everyone can use in their communication to increase their profits.”

Ankesh Kothari – Biztactics, USA
Read more about The Brain Audit
http://www.psychotactics.com/brainaudit


 Products Under $50


1) NEW! How To Put That Zing-Kapow In Your Articles (With StoryTelling)
So what are the elements of a well-told story? And why have they been playing hide and seek with us for so long?

2) You already know that 80% of a sales letter depends on your headline.
So what’s the remaining 20% that causes customers to buy? Find out more

3) Do You Often Hit A Wall Called ‘Writers Block’?
Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

4) Do you know that visuals immediately improve your sales conversion?
Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

5) Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

6) Chaos Planning
Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly half the year is over, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.


Black Belt Presentations
How to create presentations that enthral, hold and move an audience to action.



Next Step: To get more Psychological Tactics
Subscribe: :
Get Updates via RSS | Get Updates via Email