Announcing: How to join 5000bc (Without Being On The Waiting List!)

5000bc is the membership site of Psychotactics
And from Saturday 4th October to Tuesday, 7th October 2014, you get the chance to join (without being on the waiting list). The last time we opened up the waiting list was in late 2013.

Yup, a long, long time ago.

But how do you know if 5000bc is the place for you?
You read the testimonials. Do your due diligence and read the testimonials and you’ll see for yourself why our members join–and more importantly why they stay. And how you can be part of that select group as well.

The doors are open for a few days.

Have a look and judge for yourself.
http://www.psychotactics.com/5000bc

Warm regards,
s-


Announcing: A book on how to build an online community—even if you have a very small list


Here’s an interesting fact.
In fact more than one interesting fact.

Fact 1: Why our community earns us between 90-95% of our income
At 5000bc, we have had a community since 2003.But that’s not the interesting part. The interesting part is that we earn between 90-95% of our income from that community. And no, it’s not because we charge a huge membership fee. In fact, it’s very modest at just $259 a year.

But even that’s not the most interesting part. The most interesting part is that we don’t have thousands of members.

Fact No 2: We have pretty small membership numbers
Amazingly, we have just 450 members–despite being around 10 years.

And yet, these 450 members show up to all our online courses, our live workshops, buy a ton of our products. Often, you can’t even get on a course, because the members have taken every seat in less than an hour.

So why does this information make a difference to you?
It shows you how you can start up your membership site with just a few members. And grow it from there.

We had humble beginnings
And we failed repeatedly–losing members 50% at a time.

That doesn’t happen any more
10 years have taught us to not just run a community, but let the community run itself as well.

And that’s what this announcement is all about.

Announcing a book on how to create your online community
It’s not a book about search and destroy.
It’s not a book about trying to maximise returns.
It’s not a book about trying to set up stuff overnight.
Instead it’s a book called: Be Kind, Be Helpful or Begone. And it’s about building a warm, respectful and profitable community.

What’s more is that you don’t have to have a ton of folks
But I’ll let you read one of the testimonials as they trickle in.(Yes, it’s a trickle because the book has just been released and without all the hoopla).

Here’s what Wyn Snow has to say:
“As a person with limited financial resources, I always stop and think before spending more than $15 in one sitting.”

“My concern was: Will I find effective strategies for building a profitable membership site for fiction writers? I’d bought other products of Sean’s before and I was pretty confident the answer would be yes, so I went ahead and plunked down my cash. And was not disappointed.

Sean’s insights into the ingredients that build an online community were ideas I had never encountered before, not even in Sean’s other writings. I found concepts he gleaned from his experience with 5000bc that I know I can adapt to the clients I have in mind. He also answered one of my biggest concerns in getting started: I basically have NO starting “list” of people to approach for membership.

What I liked best about Sean’s Build an Online Community Membership Site book (aside from the cartoons) was the depth of his insight into why people join, leave, or stay — and the strategies that encourage them not only to join, but to PARTICIPATE and stay.

Several other great features were the illustrations — screen shots of the forums on 5000bc — and his honesty about mistakes he made along the way, plus sharing how the site started from very humble beginnings and has grown along the way.

I often recommend Sean’s website, articles and books to others because of his insight into the human nature, and why we do or don’t buy various things. And I also enjoy his quirky sense of humor (though his recipes are, I confess, too spicy for my palate)”.

So there you have it.
It’s not a cheap book. But you’ll see when you read it, that it will rock your world. Better still, it will get you started, sooner than later.

So go ahead, have a look and judge for yourself.
http://psychotactics.com/products/membership-site-strategy

Warm regards from Auckland

Sean

Why It’s Critical To Slow Down The First Week Of A Course

Why It's Critical To Slow Down The First Week Of A Course

When do most people drop out from a course?

The answer may surprise you.

It’s not in the middle of the course, or at the end. Incredibly, it’s right at the start

Right at the start of the course, is when you see (and feel) the most enthusiasm. Everyone’s been held back by those barriers and like athletes they’re eager to rush down the track to the finish line. But the problem is that a course is almost never like a 100-metre dash. It’s almost always like a marathon in which you have to pace yourself.

And so we slow them down

There are many reasons for slowing down the participants, but the biggest reason is to get them familiar with:

1) The software and hardware

2) Where everything can be found

3) Overcome the hurdles they run into

1) Let’s start with the software and hardware

If your course is being done on a forum (or any other similar system), there’s a good chance that a huge chunk of participants are completely at sea with the software. They don’t know how to do a lot of things that may seem simple in retrospect. Every move, from making a new post, to replying to a post, to adding a quote, to putting in a smiley—it all takes a bit of learning.

Even if you’re a pro in another forum, it still takes time for you to orient yourself to a new type of forum.

And that’s only part of the problem

There may be other software or hardware involved. For instance, in the cartooning course, you have to take a picture (that requires either a camera phone, camera or scanner). And then it needs to be uploaded to a picture-sharing site e.g. Flickr, or Facebook etc. And then embedded back into the forum.

And I know, I know—your eyes are glazing over.

And they should, unless you’ve been through this experience and know that all of this usually takes no more than a few minutes (and especially if you have the right software, hardware combination).

In the past, we’d give instructions and expect participants to follow them

Of course some do, and some don’t. And the ones that don’t are usually the ones that are most hassled with technology. So they get confused, they try and fail, try and fail. And by this time the course is well on its way. And then they give up. Which is crappy, because they’ve tried and failed at technology, not the course.

So instead of rushing through it all, we slow it down. The first week, in many courses, is just about orienting yourself with the technology. But of course, that’s only part of the puzzle. The second part is to locate the resources and instructions of the course.

2) Locating the instructions and resources

In any course, you need to have instructions and how-to sections. A how-to section can contain (well, should contain) the following:

- How to upload your photo into the forum

- How to resize the photo

- How to embed files/upload files into the forum

- How to navigate through the forum quickly

- How to link an external photo

- How to embed a URL

- How to mark a post unread.

These are only the technology part of the instructions. There are other instructions too. Like how to post your learning every week. Or how to comment on your group’s work.

And the list goes on and on. Without time to process this, and without specific instructions, the participants feel intense pressure.

And if they can’t find their way around, or can’t do stuff “right”, they give up.

The important point here, is that the participants aren’t expecting a course like yours

Most courses are hack-jobs. They simply have someone called the ‘teacher’. There are videos, there are audio files, there is some learning material. And there may be a forum. And that’s it. There’s no system, no slowing down. Everyone’s charged anything between $200-$20,000 and herded around like cattle. The more expensive courses will make you feel a little better, simply because of the big bucks involved, but if it’s a cheaper course, well, you’re on your own.

And you shouldn’t.

There should always be the factor of care, guidance and protection. And one of those elements of care, guidance and protection is to give everyone time so they find their way around, without feeling like they’re intruding—or worse, acting like buffoons. And this intimidation is only limited to the things we know—like technology and where to find our places and things in the course. There’s also the factor of the unknown.

3) Dealing with the unknown

We don’t know what we don’t know, right? And unless you make space for this chaos, it’s almost impossible to have time. Both for you as the trainer and for the participant as well. Having space and time to deal with chaos that may just pop up, is critical. We didn’t always follow this system, of course.

It took us years, and hosting many courses before we realised that the unknown does pop up. Maybe a participant can’t login. Or maybe there’s something else that’s slowing them down. Having space is critical to resolve these issues.

If a course is well run, dropouts don’t occur at the end, or in the middle

The biggest number of dropouts are almost immediate. If the course is extremely difficult e.g. The Article Writing Course, then the dropout rate is marginal, because the price of the course is high, and the group is expecting to run into a ton of hurdles.

But if it’s a course like the cartooning course, where the price is a lot lower, and the importance of the skill is not quite critical, it’s easier to run into bigger dropout rate.  While we’ve had a maximum of 20% dropout of the Article Writing Course (which is pure hell, I can assure you), the drop out rate in the cartooning course has been as high as 70%. Then the next year down to 50%. And down it comes, year by year, as the systems get put in place.

Learning to slow down the first week is critical, of course

And there are three big ogres you have to tackle, just to keep your participants involved.

1) The software and hardware

2) Where everything can be found

3) Overcome the hurdles they run into

Slow down.
There’s no hurry.

One more week won’t make a difference to your schedule. But for the nervous student, it’s a matter of staying in or bailing out.

P.S. Do you have a question or comment? Write it here and I will respond.


Have you read The Brain Audit? It has over 800 testimonials.


“What do your customers think? What would make them buy?”

In the Brain Audit – Sean teaches 7 steps on how to form killer communication pieces that makes people buy from you.

The Brain Audit is a simple psychological system that everyone can use in their communication to increase their profits.”

Ankesh Kothari – Biztactics, USA
Read more about The Brain Audit
http://www.psychotactics.com/brainaudit


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) NEW! The Story Telling Mini Series: (How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds)
So what are the elements of a well-told story? And why have they been playing hide and seek with us for so long?

2) You already know that 80% of a sales letter depends on your headline.
So what’s the remaining 20% that causes customers to buy? Find out more

3) Do You Often Hit A Wall Called ‘Writers Block’?
Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

4) How do you use visuals to help conversion?
Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

5) Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

6) Chaos Planning
Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly it is February, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.


Black Belt Presentation Series: When you make a presentation, wouldn’t it be amazing to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
Learn how to create presentations that enthral, hold and move an audience to action.



Next Step: To get more Psychological Tactics
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Announcing: Membership Site Strategy Book (Yes, you can buy it today at a special early bird rate)

I started writing this book around August 2009.
Now it’s 2013.

And it’s the story of 5000bc.
A membership site that hasn’t lasted just one, or two years
but will be around–and thriving for 10 whole years.

Introducing “Be Kind, Be Helpful or Begone”- A book
on how to create a thriving, helpful community online.

A book that takes you deep into the world of community
and consumption. Yes, consumption too–close to a hundred
pages on that topic alone.

The Early Bird Price
And the best price.
The final price will be $129.
Right now it’s just $89.

Get it while you can.
http://psychotactics.com/products/membership-site-strategy

Warm regards,
Sean
P.S. Yes, the price will go up.


The Magic of Vanishing Reports (And How It Increases Consumption on Membership Sites)

The Magic of Vanishing Reports (And How It Increases Consumption on Membership Sites)

Around 1970 or so, a guy called Bill Gaines did something  pretty interesting. You see, Bill Gaines was the publisher of the famous comic known, weirdly, as ‘Mad Magazine.’

And he’d put in a whole bunch of gags and cartoons in the magazine itself. Then, several months later, he’d take that content and mix a part of it with other content. And created a theme which he’d put in what he called a ‘pocket book’.

So why would subscribers buy the very same content the second time around?

The answer lies in packaging. When any content changes form, it gains in value. Suddenly, people who may have never noticed the content, now scramble to get their hands on it.

And that’s how the Vanishing Reports were born

Vanishing reports are exactly what they seem to suggest. They’re reports that show up, and then disappear. All the reports are in a PDF format too, but here’s the interesting part. All the content almost always exists on our membership site at 5000bc.com. This means that members can access the information at any time. But invariably, they don’t.

And part of the reason is that like every site your membership site (and mine) will have too much information. And the way to get the member to consume, you need to use the steps outlined in the consumption model:

1) Remove the intimidation

2) Create isolation

3) Which leads to implementation

We know that too much information creates intimidation, so we did what Bill Gaines did. We isolated the content, repackaged it in what we called the Vanishing Report and emailed the members. And the day the report comes out, the engagement goes nuts. Suddenly the place is swarming with members keen to get their report. Just for good measure, we don’t give them a direct link, but instead make the members come to the forum to get the report.

At this stage, members who may not have been engaging, get involved. They comment on the report, they ask more questions and they also do other things on the forum. And yes, isn’t that interesting? In most cases, the information exists and yet members want the information in a different format.

Now to be fair, these aren’t just text reports shoddily put together

They do have cartoons and a nice layout. They do provide a different experience and different format. Just like the pocket books from Mad Magazine did. The readers had already read the cartoons before, but they didn’t care.

The new format was differently sized and themed, and it was certainly worth the money to get the pocketbooks. In fact, Mad didn’t stop there. They started bringing out thick, telephone-directory-like products.

Again, it was just the same content recyled, but the audience didn’t care. They wanted it. And while it made Bill Gaines a millionaire (in the age where millionaires were really millionaires) it also increased consumption of Mad Magazine cartoons.

The Vanishing Reports, as you can tell, are quite similar in nature

But there are differences. For one, you could always get a copy of Mad pocket books. Not so with the Vanishing Reports. Sometimes they just vanish. And once they vanish, they may show up again, but there’s no specific timeline. And when they do show up, it’s usually for a price, instead of being free.

Customers are no dummies

They know that the PDF format is more reader friendly. They know they can stick that report into their iPad or Kindle. Or even print it out. And so the swarming happens every time. Even if a member doesn’t read the articles for months on end—thus missing some good content, they always pay close attention once a Vanishing Report is announced.

This Vanishing Report concept can be used on many membership sites

And yet many people don’t use it. And their reasoning is that they can’t withhold content from their paying members. Which is rubbish. When you offer something, you’ve made your offer very clear.

And so you can do jolly well what you like, provided you’ve outlined the terms. So when the Vanishing Report vanishes, yes there will be some grumbles, but mostly from people who were too busy to get the report, or from those who joined too late to pick up the report. Whatever the reason, most members completely buy into the concept and you don’t want the few rumblings to worry you too much.

That’s one point.

The other is that (as we’ve stated before) you can have the exact material on your website. So if someone is missing the Vanishing Report on a topic like ‘Strategic Alliances’, they could easily find it on the membership site anyway. So what the Vanishing Report does, is create engagement at several levels.

1) It gets people to read your content in PDF format.

2) It gets those who missed the report, to go hunting for articles (and reading some more valuable content as well). Yes, it all creates engagement and hence consumption.

3) When the members come in for the Vanishing Report, they engage in other discussions, start up posts of their own etc. It gets them back into the site and engaged with the other members.

The Vanishing Reports are easily one of the most popular feature of the membership site at 5000bc. And you should try it too. Because we all love when someone isolates something and packages it nicely just for us.

It’s not as “MAD” as it sounds!

P.S. Do you have a question or comment? Write it here and I will respond.

Why You Need The Brain Audit


“What do your customers think? What would make them buy?”

The Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy And Why they Don't

In the Brain Audit – Sean teaches 7 steps on how to form killer communication pieces that makes people buy from you.

The Brain Audit is a simple psychological system that everyone can use in their communication to increase their profits.”

Ankesh Kothari – Biztactics, USA
Read more about The Brain Audit
http://www.psychotactics.com/brainaudit


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) NEW! How To Put That Zing-Kapow In Your Articles (With StoryTelling)
So what are the elements of a well-told story? And why have they been playing hide and seek with us for so long?

2) You already know that 80% of a sales letter depends on your headline.
So what’s the remaining 20% that causes customers to buy? Find out more

3) Do You Often Hit A Wall Called ‘Writers Block’?
Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

4) Do you know that visuals immediately improve your sales conversion?
Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

5) Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

6) Chaos Planning
Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly it is February, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.


Black Belt Presentations
How to create presentations that enthral, hold and move an audience to action.



Next Step: To get more Psychological Tactics
Subscribe: :
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How To Create A Vibrant Community On Your Membership Site & Online Courses

How To Create A Vibrant Community On Your Membership Site & Online Courses

Notice how you brush your teeth with toothpaste every morning?

Doesn’t that seem like the most natural thing in the world to do? Well, not really.

Until about the 1900′s, few, if any people brushed their teeth with anything that anything that even closely resembled toothpaste. In fact, statistics in the United States showed that fewer than 7% of the population had anything to do with toothpaste. And as you’d expect, tooth decay was a major problem.

And along came a marketing guy called Claude Hopkins

And Hopkins created what was later called a ‘craving loop’. He created a system that would drive customers to not just buy, but use toothpaste every single day. And he created ads (the forerunner of newsletters) to get people to change their behaviour.

“Just run your tongue across your teeth”, said the advertising of the time, “and you’ll feel a film. That’s what makes your teeth look off-colour and invites decay.” The interesting part about this ad, is that it was an easy trigger. People, when asked to run their tongue over their teeth, did just that.

The same concept applies to newsletters when you have a membership site

Without a regular newsletter, no one is going to show up to your site. Well, they will show up, but not as frequently as you like. And then the concept of consumption kicks in. They don’t show up, so they don’t consume. And soon enough, their membership fails to renew. So sending out that newsletter is pretty darned critical.

But it’s not enough to send the newsletter

In 5000bc, there are about four-five new articles every week. There can be as many as 100-150 new posts and detailed responses to those posts, per day (yes, per day). Even in a reasonably new (and quiet) membership, you can have a ton of new content. And once your membership forum gets up and running, you have a ton of content buried in the forums as well. So what do you do?

You’ll tend to do what most people do

You tend to send out all the things that are available that week. And soon this becomes both addictive and demoralising. Addictive, because it’s kinda like a buffet: You see a ton of great content, and you want to go and read it all. But demoralising too, because you suddenly feel overwhelmed. You feel there’s so much to read/listen to and you simply can’t cope.

The way around this is to go to the second concept of consumption, namely isolation

Yeah, yeah, you’ve got a ton of content, but don’t push the entire load at your members. Instead, you pick the juiciest, yummiest stuff that’s been posted and drive them to that ONE thing. And you’ll notice a flurry of activity. Suddenly dozens of members are all hovering around just one article, or one series of articles. If you were to look at your statistics, you’ll find that they ignore everything else—well, almost everything else—and head to what you directed them to in the first place.

And because it’s yummy, they consume the content

If this content is on some sort of platform where they can engage, they will engage. So if you post it on a forum or a blog-kind-of-software, and the members can ask questions, discuss stuff etc., they will. And now you’re creating engagement. But instead of trying to do all things to all people, you’re focusing on one trigger.

But this trigger is slightly different for courses

If you’re doing a course,  you’re running a membership site as well. And the problem we had with our early courses, was that people would drop out. It’s not like they meant to drop out. It’s just that they got busy, yada, yada, yada. But the point is that the drop out rate was often as high as 50%—or more.

Now this doesn’t make sense, does it?

Why would you pay $500 or $2000 for a course and then drop out? Yeah, if it’s some $25 course, it’s no skin off your back, but a more expensive course hurts a lot more, doesn’t it? Well it may hurt, but people still dropped out.

Then we stumbled on the concept of daily practice

Not weekly, not bi-weekly. Not even every two days. Every day.

Every darned day (except the weekends, that is).

You know this from your own experience

Let’s say you have a language class every Tuesday night. And it’s held every week. And you get some assignments to do. When do you do those assignments? Yup, on Monday. Or even worse, on Tuesday itself. And sometimes it all gets too much and you don’t get it done at all.

And learning goes down, comprehension goes down. And dropouts in both member levels as well as learning occurs. But with daily practice, the participant is able to learn tiny increments daily. And this enables them to get confidence daily and move ahead—yup, daily. And of course their assignment, that they do the previous night, that too is done, daily.

So like brushing, the participants show up like clockwork day after day

And this is because the assignments are created to be daily progressions. Just like you wouldn’t brush just once a week, you wouldn’t show up once a week on the course as well. So instead of you, the trainer, having to send out reminders to get people back all the time, all you’re doing is creating a habit.

And once the habit is set, it becomes slightly addictive

Just like you’ve seen on Facebook, people get addicted to checking in to the forum several times a day. And the reason is simple. Because they’ve done their work—and because the increment was so tiny—they’re now free to comment on the work of their group. Just like you get tied to the updates of the your ‘group’ on Facebook, you get tied to the group updates.

But unlike the rambling nature of Facebook, the courses provide a real rush of dopamine

When we do something well, and start to master little bits, we get this amazing feeling of achievement. And every visit to the forum, learning a little bit more, turns the person into an even greater expert. Plus there’s the social aspect of the group. They help you, so you help them, and everyone learns from each other. The intimidation level is wayyyyyy down and the confidence level is much higher.

But can this course technique be replicated in a membership site as well?

Can you draw people in on a daily basis? Incredibly the answer is yes. Yes, you can. But you have to create a system that enables them to have to check in every single day. And we looked at some of those forums e.g. The Taking Action Forum. Setting up a forum such as this, and setting guidelines in place, enables people to keep coming back repeatedly.

Of course, the course is among the most fool-proof systems to get participants back over and over again, and that’s just because it’s time bound. A course will last three months, or six months or maybe a year. But it doesn’t have this sense of infinity in place. A membership site doesn’t always have this kind of time-zone, and it’s hence it’s a lot harder to get members to show up on a daily basis.

Harder, not impossible

With the right systems and a great deal of persistence, you can chip away and get your members to frequent as often as those doing courses. And yes, even for us it’s an ongoing experiment/battle. But we know one thing for sure.

Frequency counts

For your membership site, you want to get your members to drop in to at least one big event/topic every week. And if you’re doing a course, believe me, you want them to show up every single day. That’s the way you get the consumption factor going great bazookas! And that’s why people keep coming back time after time.

Just like you brush your teeth.

Every, single, day

Maybe, even twice a day!

P.S. Do you have a question or comment? Write it here and I will respond.

The Brain Audit—Read what Howie Jacobson, author of “Adwords for Dummies”, has to say:


“The Brain Audit turns a century of brain research and market testing into 7 vivid and clear steps that anyone can use to make their own marketing more compelling”

Why? Principally because Sean understands and conveys underlying structure better than anyone else I know. He loves showing people the simple steps that make all the difference, so we can ignore the fluff. The result is always entertaining, frequently hilarious, and to any business that wants to attract and serve more customers and clients, incredibly valuable.

The Brain Audit turns a century of brain research and market testing into 7 vivid and clear steps that anyone can use to make their own marketing more compelling. And the best thing is, none of this is obvious. You never walk away from Sean’s brain with the feeling of, “Oh yeah, I knew that.” His approach and insight bring tired old marketing concepts like “USP” and “positioning” and “differentiators” to life in new forms.

Howie Jacobson
Author, Google AdWords For Dummies

Read more about The Brain Audit


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) NEW! How To Put That Zing-Kapow In Your Articles (With StoryTelling)
So what are the elements of a well-told story? And why have they been playing hide and seek with us for so long?

2) You already know that 80% of a sales letter depends on your headline.
So what’s the remaining 20% that causes customers to buy? Find out more

3) Do You Often Hit A Wall Called ‘Writers Block’?
Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

4) Do you know that visuals immediately improve your sales conversion?
Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

5) Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

6) Chaos Planning
Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly the year is nearly over, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.


Black Belt Presentations
How to create presentations that enthral, hold and move an audience to action.



Next Step: To get more Psychological Tactics
Subscribe: :
Get Updates via RSS | Get Updates via Email


The Importance of Alumni: How They Create A Safe Zone To Your Courses

The Importance of Alumni: How They Create A Safe Zone To Your Courses

On May 5, 1954, no human had ever run the four-minute mile

Then May 6 dawned.  And at an athletic meet watched by 3000 spectators, Roger Bannister ran the mile in 3 minutes and 59.4 seconds. Just 46 days later, that record was decimated by a whole second by Roger’s rival, Landy.  Today that barrier has been lowered by a chunky 17 seconds. What seemed impossible at the time, is now considered not just doable, but doable with great poise and confidence.

The alumni creates exactly the same factor for your course: They show how doable it is

When you start up a course, you do your best to make it as easy as possible to achieve. And it’s more than likely that you want to get this message of ease across to the course participants. But they don’t see it that way at all. Often they see you as the maestro, the person they hope to be, sometime in the future.

But at least at the start of the course, there’s a huge mismatch. Despite their best intentions and bravado, the participants can’t see themselves replicating what you do. But the alumni prove that they’ve broken the four-minute barrier. And they create an atmosphere and end point that any new participant can envision. And in doing so, they create a series of winners for you—all breaking the four-minute barrier.

But the usefulness of the alumni doesn’t stop there.

They’re critical in creating a safe zone, and they do so in many ways:

1) They tackle the questions that may seem ‘too hard to ask’

2) Smoothening out the bumpy logistical issues

2) They share their experiences in great detail.

1) Tackling the questions that may seem ‘too hard to ask’

When a person just begins a course, they feel a great deal of intimidation. You may do all you can to get them to relax, but they’re clearly out of their comfort zone. And the alumni helps them relax. Now, instead of having to deal with you, the head honcho; the big shot, the new participants may prefer to deal with the alumni instead.

While they may hesitate to ask you questions, they find it a lot less intimidating to ask the alumni the very same questions. This gets the new participants relaxed and this relaxation is very important. If the participants feel agitated, it creates a big barrier to their learning. Once that wall is down, they can actually let their hair down, have fun and speed up their learning.

If that’s all the alumni did, they’d be super-useful, but it doesn’t stop there. The logistical issues can bury a newcomer. And the alumni does a lot to smoothen out the bumps.

2) Smoothening out the bumpy logistical issues

Let’s take the Psychotactics cartooning course, for instance. Part of the course requires you to post your cartoon online and link it back to the forum (ah, your eyes are glazing over already, aren’t they?)

Well, when you’re a newcomer on the course, it’s more than just the logistical issues that bug you. You may have logistical issues AND you may be opposed to posting online OR not want to do this, or do that. Usually someone in the alumni has gone through the same logical nightmare and trepidation (big word for ‘bubbling fear’) as you. When they describe what they did, and how they resolved the issues, you know you can do it too.

And of course, all issues can’t be covered. There’s always something that’s missing

But that’s where the Ask Alumni section comes in. If you have a place to Ask Alumni, you know you can always fire away, and get a response. It’s always a lot harder to deal with the head honcho (that’s you, who’s holding the course) because you may feel you’re interrupting, or that your questions are too silly. But it’s not that hard to ask Alumni.

What’s also interesting, is that these issues come out only right at the start of a course. Once a week or two has passed, everyone’s mostly settled in. Which also brings up an interesting point: Participants need to be comfortable BEFORE the course, not get flustered during the course. So it’s important to get them to interact for a week or two BEFORE the course begins.

That way all the issues (logistical or otherwise, can be ironed out) long before the course rockets away. With the questions out of the way, it’s time for the third biggie: sharing their experiences.

3) They share their experiences in great detail

The experiences of the alumni are critical for one reason alone: Every one of their experiences are utterly unique. Yes, some experiences may overlap, but there’s still a massive factor of uniqueness about every single one of them. On the Article Writing Course, for instance, one person wrote about how she overcame years of bullying and how the course helped her. Another talked about how his speed cartoons amazed a child on the train.

All of these experiences pop up, in strange and wonderful ways. But the struggle comes through as well. When the alumni add their joys, struggles and how they battled with resistance, the incoming batch know they’re dealing with people just like themselves. It’s very, very hard for a newbie to identify with the maestro, no matter how similar the experience, but with alumni it’s a lot easier.

And that’s because the alumni are folks who’ve just been part of the previous batch. Just three, six or twelve months ago, they were where the incoming group sat. And so the experiences become real.

But the problem does arise…

What if you don’t have alumni? What if you’re doing a course for the first time? Or what if you’re doing a course after a longish period? We have the very same issues at Psychotactics. In 2012, we were nudged by a client to conduct the Headlines course. We hadn’t done that course since 2010, and even if we did round up the alumni, the gap between the two courses would have been to vast to remember details. So there was no alumni to advise the incoming group. And this is the case if you’re doing a course for the first time as well.

And in this case, you can’t do much this time around, but you must then put it in your system to train the new course members to be alumni. The way to do this is to get them through the course and then right at the end for them to post advice for the next batch. Yes, the next batch may be a year or two years away, but it doesn’t matter.

The fact that the advice is already in place enables you to then port the advice over, so that the next batch gets the warm, comforting effect as they settle in. And because the alumni have given advice, they’re also keen to come back and help, but only provided you make your expectations clear, even as the course is in progress.

Alumni are almost never considered when training a group

Yet they are extremely useful to get the raw edginess out of the way. They help with logistical issues. And they share their experiences. In short, they become part of your team. They’re helping you, creating a sense of volunteerism and camaraderie. Over time, you’ll find that alumni relish this chance to pitch in and help. It’s up to you to give them this opportunity.

And all of these steps make a course more doable

At Psychotactics, some of our courses like the cartooning course are fun, yet require discipline. Other courses like the Article Writing Course is billed as the Toughest Writing Course in the World. And yet, as alumni play their role, we see 80-90% get to the finish line, despite the odds. And the reason they know they can get there is because of the alumni.

The alumni is the four-minute mile. And your incoming group knows they too, can do just the same—or even better.

P.S. Do you have a question or comment? Write it here and I will respond.

Why You Need The Brain Audit


“The first thing I noticed was that the ‘Brain Audit’ had 68 reviews with a five- star rating. And here’s the thing: they weren’t canned, they were the real thing.”

The Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy And Why they Don't

“The first time I heard about the ‘Brain Audit’ is when I was trying to learn something about ‘Why People Buy’. So then I googled ‘marketing’ and the results were staggering. I kept at it for hours until I finally happened on the ‘Brain Audit’

What I got was that The Brain Audit book was basically a story about seven red bags that explained marketing in a simple yet carefully structured way that anyone could understand. It didn’t seem possible. But how was I to argue with 68 people? So I bought the book.Then I read it in one sitting (took me about four hours). And it was everything they (the 68) said it was.

What I did after reading the book was to apply it to just about everything I saw on TV, magazines, and info-memorials and on. After a while it gets a little weird looking at a commercial and saying to yourself….mmmm…pretty good, but why didn’t they cover the hidden risk?

It really needs some risk reversal. Or why didn’t they cover more objections? They left themselves vulnerable. And that’s the way they set up the testimonials? The six questions on page 89 would’ve worked perfectly there…plus, they’re one bag short.”

See what I mean? It gets too you.
Read the book, you’ll see what I mean. It’ll get to you too.”

Marty Shea, San Jose, CA

Read how The Brain Audit can help you
http://www.psychotactics.com/brainaudit


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Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

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Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

5) Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

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Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly half the year is over, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.


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Announcing: Three Special Offers From 13-16 March 2012



Offer 1: The Brain Audit +  Special Goodies worth $158

Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy And Why They Dont

*If you’ve wondered why customers back away at the last minute, both online and offline, you’ll find the specific answers on the page below.

*If you have a website or intend to sell something off your website, you’ll avoid all of these mistakes, that if not fixed, will drive away customers.

Judge for yourself. I think you’ll be really pleased with what you  see.
The Brain Audit Special Offer



Offer 2: Join 5000bc without going on the waiting list

The Motto of 5000bc Membership: Be kind, Be helpful or Be gone

Imagine you asked a question. And you needed the answer to that question. e.g. How to create Strategic Alliances. In 5000bc, you have two options. You find detailed articles that tell you how to go about things. Or if the articles don’t exist, I write them for you (Try finding that kind of service online).

I just wanted you to know that 5000bc is now at  the point where we have to restrict entry. However from  13-16 March 2012, you can join 5000bc without having to endlessly wait in the wings. And only a limited number will be able to join. Judge for yourself.
Join  5000bc without going on  the waiting list .



Offer 3: How To Get The Black Belt Presentations Series  (Installments Special)

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How The Identity Factor Affects Memberships

How To Run A Membership Site

$250 vs. $250

So a client has two sets of $250.

One says $250.

The other says $250.

Do they look exactly the same to you?

They do, don’t they?

But how the client spends the $250 on your business is what’s crucial. If they spend one type of $250, they may consume a bit of it and never come back, or come back infrequently. If they spend another type of $250, they come back over and over, and then spend far more than $250.

In some cases, they move from $250 to $500, even $10,000 or more. And over the lifetime of the client, they may not just be very profitable for your business, but also get in other clients just like them, thus adding to your reputation and revenue streams.

But which $250 will you choose?

Heh, heh, I’ve been teasing you, but let’s get to the point with an example, shall we?

Let’s say a client is a member of your membership site. And the annual fees for the site are $250. A membership site is a lot like a gym membership. If you use the gym facilities, you keep paying for it over the years. But if you don’t use it, along comes your New Year resolution day, and you let your membership lapse. The same applies to a membership site that’s not being used.

And there’s a reason why membership sites are not used to their fullest

But now that client has paid $250 for the membership, and so they feel the need to dip in their toes from time to time, but it’s not enough. It doesn’t matter what’s in the site—doesn’t matter at all. You could have the most amazing content, the greatest interviews etc.

It doesn’t matter for a good majority of the people on your membership site. That’s because your fantabulous content is driving the clients nuts. They want to consume the content, but for most of your members it comes too thick and fast. And so, like the gym membership, they don’t consume and the renewal doesn’t go through.

But what if the clients were to do a $250 course?

Now things change. This course has changed the dynamics completely. They’ve got their membership and yet they want to further their education, and so they spend the second $250 on the course.

The course may be something like learning how to draw cartoons, or how to write headlines, or write articles etc. It may not necessarily be a very long course and may just last four-eight weeks. But the value of the additional paid course is often greater than the membership.

“Of course it is”, you say aloud!

“The membership has a ton of information, but it’s not always specific to a person’s needs. A course on the other hand is specific. ” Fair enough. But that’s not the sole magic of the course. The magic of the course lies in the factor of identity.

The moment the client is segregated from the rest of the member’s group, there’s a shift in their brain. They’re now a select audience. And this gives every member a sense of identity. Being in a smaller group is critical (this is why at Psychotactics we have just 33 participants at a workshop, and no more than 20 people on any given course).

Now they consume at a far greater level

And more importantly, they get a sense of identity. A member that hasn’t participated at all in a larger group, when encouraged well, will suddenly sprout wings and become exceedingly prolific in their contribution. The more prolific they get, the more they’re respected and accepted by the group. And the identity grows.

Now the member is not just a member of a boring membership site. Now the course has made them feel relaxed. Made them feel at home. And it just so happens that the member is learning a new skill and gaining enormous confidence as well.

What happens next?

A course is a drug. If conducted well, a member will want to be part of another course and another and another, always upgrading skills as they go along. But with every minor upgrade, they get more confident and wander into the main membership area where they start to contribute as well.

So someone doing the cartooning or headlines course may stay well the limits of the cartooning course for the duration of the course, but once the course is over, an inevitable emptiness fills the space.

That emptiness has to be filled

And it’s filled by the main membership area. Almost the entire group will then move to the main area where they will participate with invigorated gusto and bonhomie. The identity factor has kicked into top gear. They no longer feel they’re just another name or number. They feel part of the group and hence participate willingly. Incredible as it may sound, they need to pay the second $250 to get the greatest value from the first $250.

The membership did indeed cost them $250 (that’s the first $250) but it’s the second $250 (for the course) that makes the difference to ease the transition of no identity to identity. The more they participate in the course, the more they tend to participate in the general area.

Makes sense, doesn’t it? After all we’re all slightly unnerved when we get into a new space, or travel to a new city. But give us a few days in that city and give us a few friendly faces, and we’re happy as clams. Makes perfect sense!

But if this is so effective, why charge $250? Why not have the course free?

For one, courses take enormous time and planning. Even if you’ve done a course before, there are still squillions of things to consider. So unless you’ve got tons of resources and time, it’s better to do a paid course. The second factor is that of increased consumption.

A member that joins a paid course is thrice as likely to completely the course as one who hasn’t* paid for the course. This doesn’t mean you can’t make a free course extremely valuable. It can be done. However if you can charge a client, it’s important to do so, both for the client as well as you.

But this is where the first $250 comes into play

If the client is not a member of your site, then they go out into the ‘wild open spaces’ once the course is complete. But if they’re a member, they go right back into the community and start contributing. This enhances their sense of identity.

In their own minds they’re no longer newbies. But more so, and I know you’ve been paying attention, they are part of this group. This is their herd, tribe, hangout—whatever you want to call it. This is where they have a space to congregate and participate.

So goody, this applies to some fancy information site. But how does it apply to a cafe?

Or a yoga class? Or an online site that sells tea?

It does. And the moment we go through the first example, you’ll work it out for the others as well. Let’s say you have a yoga class. And heck yeah, you get people to show up to that class on a regular or irregular basis. But see, there’s no identity in place. Everyone shows up. They unfold their mats. They nod politely to their neighbour next door. And they’re off. No one cares. No identity at all.

Now change the identity dynamics

Offer a weekend course, or even a 5-hour course. Keep the numbers small. Then make sure everyone knows each other at the start of the course. And as the course advances, get the participants to work in groups (there’s safety in numbers).

The more they work in the group, the more they get to know the others within the group. And by the end of the course or weekend, they get to know everyone. They may not need to get along with everyone, but to know everyone and develop additional knowledge on the subject is enough to create a solid sense of identity. Once the identity has been melded into place, this spills back to the regular yoga class.

Now when they get back, they’re no longer just participants.

You got it! They have a sense of identity. They’re part of something and better at something and they know someone. The same applies to a cafe. Yes you drink coffee at the cafe and you do the same nodding at familiar faces, but there’s no sense of identity. But have a special event just for the cafe folks—even a small wine and cheese evening, and watch the change in dynamics. But what if you’re that online tea company? There are ways to create a niche group.

Everyone gets to meet and introduce each other. Then everyone is tasting the same tea. The person from New Zealand is drinking the same tea as the person from Paris, Texas. And they’re interacting. They’re getting a sense of identity and expertise. And you’re getting a sense of the importance of identity as well, aren’t you?

But you may well miss out on the important aspects of this second $250 exercise…

The most important factor is not to simply have another course. If the yoga class instructor has a weekend course and doesn’t get the group to work and mingle, this concept of identity doesn’t come to the fore. If the groups are not made into smaller groups, it won’t work.

Then all you’re really doing is taking the big yoga class and creating a mini yoga class. You’re not getting the group to mingle and meet. And it’s in that mingling and meeting that you foster the sense of identity.

This is one (just one) of the reasons why a Psychotactics course has such a high rate of success

The Article Writing Course course is the toughest writing course in the world (one participant said it was the toughest in the universe). Yet between 80-90% stick out the entire duration of the course (we’re talking three months of daily grind here. Think of 90 days of slog and you’ll get the idea).

And the same applies to the Headlines Course. We’ve seen more drop off in some courses, but it’s work in progress. Sometimes the course itself needs tweaking. Sometimes it’s the group dynamics. Sometimes it’s the pricing (higher priced courses get higher consumption). But we’re going off track here…

So the high rate of success is because every course is firstly, small.

Yes, we could easily have a group of 500 people, but it wouldn’t help foster any sort of lasting identity. Then every group within the course is split into smaller groups.

So a group of 20 will be split up into 4-5 groups. The sense of identity is greatly enhanced in the tiny group, then taken over to the main group and finally finds a voice in the larger group (that is the membership at 5000bc). The small, small, small groups are critical. The merging into the bigger groups are also critical. This isn’t about just having a workshop. This is kinda like making buddies. People you know and trust, at least on some level.

Which is why we’ll have a Psychotactics workshop

We live in New Zealand, and yet we’ll fly half way across the planet to have a workshop in the US or Canada (Yes, we’re coming to Europe) just so that we can do this very thing. We need the Psychotactics group to meet at a course, get smarter, get into smaller and then bigger and then bigger groups. If a person is part of a course, they are more likely to join 5000bc to keep their sense of identity and expertise going. If they don’t join 5000bc, they go their own way.

The members that stay within 5000bc consume more and buy more

This boosts revenue and longevity of the client. But the client isn’t an idiot. They would buy more and consume more only if they’re getting a return on their time and money investment.

And they do, so they keep coming back. This becomes extremely important for the group, because now the group has members with a solid sense of identity, expertise and hence the conversation becomes extremely rich and diverse. And confident. You see passion and confidence oozing and this spills over to other members, who in turn benefit. This allows the participants in the course to give back, when they can. And participation soars, even with a small community.

But what happens to the person that goes their own way?

They may come back. They may not. If they don’t join the membership site, their identity isn’t forged. It’s possible to get them to come back and start anew, but the whole process is a lot more time-consuming. Therefore you need to have a place where a client can spend $250 and $250.

$250 gets them into a membership.

$250 gets them into a course.

Which one is better? If I had to choose, I wouldn’t. Because it’s a bit of a toughie. The key is the understanding that over time you need to have both the elements in place. You need the course and you need the membership area. So you need to have your regular yoga class and you need to have the course. You need to have the coffee addiction and the special event. You have to have the membership site at 5000bc and the live workshop.

But what if you don’t have both?

Then a good place is to start somewhere. Somewhere a person can get a sense of identity. A membership site may well be some distance away. So announce a course. And get people to join and interact. Then you can move them onwards. If you don’t have a course, put together a book (or a booklet).

When we started with Psychotactics, we had no book, no membership. But we did have a tiny list and they bought into The Brain Audit (which was just 16 pages long at the time). That group of buyers were invited to join 5000bc in the year 2003. At a annual membership of $7 a year (yes, a year). They joined. Later the fee went up and up—and it continues to rise. But the members stayed. We had courses that they attended and they came along. And it reinforced their identity. So they stayed.

We obviously do things a lot better than we did back in the year 2003, or 2004 or 2010 for that matter. And you want to start somewhere. And realise that having a course leads to the membership, which leads to the course, which leads back to the membership, which leads back to a course, which leads to the membership…you’re getting the picture aren’t you?

You may not charge $250. You may charge $7.

The concept is the same. If you want lasting revenue, you must create a sense of intense identity with your clients. They in turn will repay this identity by adding to the group and learning from you, and buying your product or service over and over again.

Do you have story about how identity affects membership? Share your story here

What do your customers think? What would make them buy?

brainaudit_book1

In the Brain Audit – Sean teaches 7 steps on how to form killer communication pieces that makes people buy from you. The Brain Audit is a simple psychological system that everyone can use in their communication to increase their profits.”

Ankesh Kothari – Biztactics, USA

Judge for yourself

Find out how The Brain Audit can help you


“The membership fee is less than what I pay for my annual chamber of commerce dues, but the value I get is so much greater.”

“5000bc has some amazingly brilliant, successful and inspiring business people from all industries. I can’t believe how helpful and friendly the forum members are.

One of my objectives when signing up was to be in the company of business people more successful than me so I could learn from them. I definitely found an abundance of them here. I am also impressed at Sean’s involvement in the day-to-day conversations taking place in the forums.

The quality of interaction and the caliber of the other members makes this a great place to visit and be inspired to improve my own business.”

Natalya Murphy On 5000bc Membership For Small Business

Natalya Murphy

Washington, DC, USA

Judge for yourself http://www.psychotactics.com/5000bc


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How Guides Help Increase Consumption

intuitive

Have you ever been to a party where you knew no one? And then like an angel, an old friend pops up with a big smile. Suddenly you feel relieved. Suddenly the anxiety-factor washes off you and you start to relax.

That friend is simply acting as a guide

She shows you around the place.
She introduces you to others.
She makes you feel welcome.

You actually start to have a good time and enjoy yourself.

But what if that friend hadn’t shown up at that moment?

You would have looked around cagily.

Others at the party would look at you briefly over their margaritas and pinacoladas, and gone back to talking to their own friends. You’d instantly feel isolated. Even intimidated to some extent.

A Guide is meant to reduce the intimidation and confusion

When someone enters 5000bc (our membership site), they’re in a strange place (ok, unfamiliar) :)

They don’t always know the other members. And most importantly, they don’t always know how to find their way around. So they try ‘this and that.’ And if it works, it works. But if things don’t work, then they give up. And don’t come back.

Which is very bad for consumption

It’s bad for your client, because they’ve paid for something they’re not sure how to use.It’s bad for you as a marketer, because a confused client who doesn’t use your product/service is very, very unlikely to come back.

Which is why we created the Cave Guide System at 5000bc

The Cave Guide System works on these core principles:

1) Create a welcoming zone.
2) Reduce intimidation, fear and frustration of being in an unfamiliar environment.
3) Isolate actions to ensure consumption.

Step 1: Create a Welcoming Zone.

Like the party, all members need to get a warm welcome. The warm welcome is done through a series of autoresponders, actual one-on-one emails, and other contact such as a phone call.

Then the next step is to ask the members if they’d like to have a Cave Guide. In many cases, members are very happy to have a Cave Guide who shows them around.

And this simple act dramatically reduces intimidation.

Step 2: Reduce intimidation, fear and frustration of being in an unfamiliar environment.

It doesn’t matter how warm your welcome, there’s still a factor of fear and frustration, because of dealing with unfamiliar situations.

Not only are members not sure if they want to ask a question. But they aren’t sure if their question won’t appear foolish. And they’re not sure who’s going to answer the question.

What if no one answers the questions? A million thoughts run through your head. And these thoughts are normal for everyone, because no matter how bold you are in your own environment, you aren’t quite sure what to do when getting to another environment.

So having someone who can answer your email; give you specific instructions; lead you through the labyrinth of information, makes a member confident.

What’s more, is that these issues aren’t restricted to new members. Existing members may not be familiar with some new additions to the membership site. And may be just as unsure.

The Cave Guide removes a lot of that fear.

And you know you’re dealing with someone who’s willing to hear you out. But most importantly, you don’t feel like you’ll make a fool of yourself in front of everyone. And that the Guide will help you through the process. Plus there is a mountain of ‘how-to’ material to help you navigate 5000bc.

But as you now know, a mountain of information only confuses members even more. So isolation of information or an isolation of an action, is critical.

Step 3: Isolate actions to ensure consumption

If you go to a party, and you’re introduced to everyone, then you suddenly can’t seem to remember anyone’s name. But if you’re introduced to one person, then you can talk to that person one on one. And you actually get a conversation going.

This concept is used to ensure one action. So when a member enters 5000bc, all they are asked to do is introduce themselves. When the introduction is done, we encourage them to post their photo (and yes, there’s an instruction guide for this). And so on, each instruction is given, one step at a time.

When they complete each instruction, they’re supposed to report back to the Cave Guide. (Hey, can you see the consumption?)

So does all of this take time?

Sure it does.
And effort.

But once you’ve got the system going, it runs like clockwork (We’ve been working on the system for about 3 years now, and we’re still working on it).

So why bother going through all this trouble?

In one word: Consumption.

A client that consumes keeps coming back. And this means we don’t have to keep going out to get new clients all the time, like everyone else does.

In fact, less than 3% of our entire list generates about 90% of our income.

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5000bc last day: Will You Get In Before The Closing Date?

oogah

In your business it’s not enough to just learn. You need to get things done if you really want that “3-Month Vacation”.

Most small business owners seem to be frozen or going around in circles.
There’s so much advice out there; so much information that only a completely nutty person would sign up for even more information.

And yet 5000bc is not just about information…
It’s about specific information. If you’re working on a project to create a report, then you get specific information. If you get stuck without the technology involved in creating the report, there’s help at hand. If you get stuck with “what to write” there’s help at hand.

If you just need someone to make sure you don’t slip into the valley of chaos—there’s help at hand again.

Information is a waste of time.
Specific information isn’t.

5000bc is different because it’s a safe zone. The rule is: be helpful, be kind or begone.

You get the information you need, the support you need and get to move ahead instead of spinning your wheels. And the time to act is um, pretty soon, I’d say.

Because on June 12th, we’re closing the doors to 5000bc.
If you don’t get in by that date, you’ll need to go on a waiting list to enter. And that’s no fun at all.

Most members are pretty sure they didn’t need 5000bc.
Then they join and enter a magical place. Here’s the nudge to join us in that magical place before the door close.

Judge for yourself at http://www.5000bc.com

Warm regards,
Sean
P.S. If you need to speak/email a 5000bc member before joining, then feel free to get in touch with me and I’ll forward your request.


Lynda Weinman of Lynda.com speaks about membership sites to Sean D’Souza

lynda
Do you sometimes feel you’ve run into a rock star?

Not just any rock star, but the one that really commands the respect of everyone around? Well, today we’re we’re going to speak to Lynda Weinman: the rock star of software training. Peachpit Press calls Lynda Weinman is the best-known and highly respected teacher of web design in the world

You may have seen her site at Lynda.com

Lynda.com is a massively popular site with well over 200,000 page views per day. And the person behind all of this amazing information is Lynda Weinman.
Alrighty then, let’s get this show on the road. :)

Want to read the transcript? Hmmm…let’s see. Here you go.

Here’s some of the content we cover:
————————————————————-
2 Type of Site + Agenda
————————————————————-

2.1 How did you decide which type of site to go with?

2.3 Agenda: What we’ll cover today:
a- Starting up
b- Running The Site
c- Consumption of content

————————————————————-
3 Starting Up
————————————————————-

3.1 What caused you to say: Let’s put Lynda.com together?

3.2 Start up challenges: Technology

3.3 Start up challenges: Conversion

3.4 Mistakes Learned About Start Up

3.5 Biggest Criteria When Starting Up

3.6 Early Conversion: What do you think is the biggest draw card to conversion?

————————————————————-
4 Running Membership Sites
————————————————————-

4.1 How much content do you need to put in? Frequency?

4.2 There’s an absence of forums etc on Lynda.com. Was that a
conscious decision?

4.3 What’s Your Content Creation Strategy?

4.4 How much time is involved in the running of the site?

4.5 What are the biggest challenges in running the site?

————————————————————-
5 Consumption
————————————————————-

5.1 How Do Manage Client’s Expectations?

5.1.1 Media Expectations

5.1.2 Type of Content

5.1.3 Technology

5.2 What’s a typical retention rate look like?

5.3 What techniques help you retain customers better?

5.4 Ideas that came from customers that help in better consumption