Positioning: The Difference Between Painkillers and Vitamins

 

painkillers-vs-vitamins

Think about your transaction with Starbucks.
You’d think we go there for a coffee, right?

But a coffee could be considered a vitamin-kind of business

You know how vitamins work, right? You are told to take your vitamins. But you can’t always see the results of all of that pill popping. And you can’t even tell if it’s all nonsense, or if it really works. So vitamins become an interesting, yet seemingly weird exercise.

Now compare that with painkillers

Painkillers aren’t a nice-to-have. And when you look around you, you see companies that are vitamin-like. And those that are pain-killers. Starbucks is a decent example. It’s not exactly healthy to drink a ton of coffee, and it’s expensive.

Two tall lattes a day could push up your calories by about 160,600 calories a year. And it’s expensive on the wallet too, heading close to about $3000 a year on coffee alone.

So how does Starbucks make this very expensive vitamin-based exercise into a painkiller?

Painkiller industries are those you can’t do without

This means that the more hooks you get into the customer, the more they’re likely to want to come back time and time again. And Starbucks, at the very core, provided the greatest hook of all: the place to sit around away from home and from the office.

While cafes like Starbucks are a plenty today, the reason they first took off was the space you couldn’t do without. The coffee was better than any other place, or at least different, but it was also the place that provided the painkiller. You were free from the chaos, if only for 15-20 minutes.

While Starbucks was a point of refuge for folks in the West, it’s seen as a point of status in the East

In China, coffee is a bit of a non-entity. For thousands of years, the Chinese have stuck to their tea leaves. Over 70% of the hot drink market is still very much centred around tea. But coffee consumption is growing at 25% per year.

The key to that growth is the young and the trendy. The cafes are where the younger folk hang out. There’s a pain with not being trendy, and so the younger generation flock to cafes.

So what we notice is that there’s a very fine line between vitamins and painkillers

The line lies in the positioning of the product or service. If positioned as a nice-to-have, the product or service may lose traction.

When positioned as a painkiller, the product soon becomes indispensable. The concept of painkiller is tied directly to frequency of consumption. The more you consume, the more you will consume in future.

This means that a coaching service like improving your golf game is a vitamin or a painkiller

And this totally depends on the way you’ve positioned your service. If it’s just about you getting out there and improving how you whack that ball over the green, then it’s fun. It will get you back every now and then.

But if positioning is different, the very same service becomes a painkiller. If the service is positioned as “never losing face in front of your buddies”, it’s now far more competitive, far more interesting to you as an individual.

And this painkiller issue doesn’t prop up when we’re trying to sell our own products or services

As business owners we definitely want to improve the sales of our products or services. So we sit down at our desks and come up with some mundane issue like “getting more customers” or “making more profits”.

And yet, this issue is quickly killed by talking to a client. That client yes a real person (called the “target profile” in The Brain Audit) is instrumental in expressing the difference between a vitamin-based product and a painkiller.

So let’s take an example

When I first started selling the Article Writing Course as a service, my sales pitch was about “writing quickly” or “writing well”. That’s a vitamin. It’s a nice to have, but it’s hard to convince a person to slog for three months to write quickly,or well for that matter.

Then I spoke to the target profile. And the headline morphed into: How to stop knocking on client’s doors, and get them to call you instead. (Learn why articles do a far superior job of attracting the clients you want, and how the right articles make you the expert in your field).

At this point it was no longer a vitamin—it was a painkiller

Most of us detest having to go into yet another meeting to get a client. We hate the marketing, the endless door knocking and it drains us of our energy. Having a client come to us seems like a dream come true.

And to have not just any ol’ client but clients that are perfect matches for you, is almost too good to be true. Now the service isn’t just skirting the issue of vitamins, it’s a must-have. Which is why even though the Article Writing Course is billed as the “Toughest Writing Course in the World”, and is priced well north of $2,500, it sells out in an hour, sometimes less.

The pain is so great, that the client feel compelled to reach out for that painkiller.

But isn’t this a bit over-the-top persuasion?

The reality is that we as humans make decisions based on intense need. We don’t form habits based on some future scenario.

This is why, for instance, if a comet were hurtling toward the planet in 2200, we’d be doing nothing. But if that comet was headed here in 10 years, we’d be working our tails off trying to find a solution to deflect it back into space.

Starbucks took what was considered to be a vitamin and turned it into a painkiller

By creating a need for the space, they created a habit. A habit that’s extremely hard to break, no matter how expensive in terms of calories or dollars. And it’s why we go back time and time again.

This insight of positioning your product correctly doesn’t come from sitting at your desk writing endless headlines. It comes from meeting the client and conducting the target profile interview.

Every product or service is both a vitamin and a painkiller.

Painkillers work better.


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Announcing: How To Stand Out From Your Competition: Free Goodies

Have you ever wondered what it might feel like to not be me-too?
What would it be like to stand out from the competition in a way
that customers choose you over everyone else? And what if you
were to raise your prices, and they still kept coming?

 

That’s what uniqueness can do to your product or service.
Yet most of us seem to know what makes our product or service
better than competition.

 

But the customer doesn’t know.
So they go elsewhere.
Some cheaper. Somewhere crappier. But they don’t come to you
in the droves you’ve imagined.

 

Presenting: Uniqueness Goodies (Yup, FREE Goodies!)

Everyone tells you that uniqueness is important, but no one tells you
how to work through the uniqueness minefield.

Until now, that is..
You will get access to articles, audio and video.
Even if you don’t like video, I would recommend you watch the
videos. They are just 15 minutes. Your understanding of uniqueness
will change dramatically after you watch these detailed videos and
reading the articles.

 

Here is the sequence of what to expect in the coming weeks
Free Goodie No. 1: Uniqueness: Why We Get It Wrong
Free Goodie No. 2:  Getting to Uniqueness Part 1 & 2
Free Goodie No. 3: Uniqueness: The Importance of the Mundane and
the Seemingly Uninteresting
Free Goodie No. 4: Uniqueness mistakes and how to avoid them
Free Goodie No. 5: Uniqueness: The Difference (and Resemblance)
Between Uniqueness and the Other Red Bags
Free Goodie No. 6: Uniqueness: Do You Need To Carve Out a
Uniqueness For ‘Every’ Product or Service?

 

How to get the goodies?
Have a look at this page for all the details: Uniqueness Free Goodies

 

Regards
Sean D’Souza

Announcing: How To Stand Out From Your Competition

Uniqueness Strategy: Psychotactics
Have you ever wondered what it might feel like to not be me-too?
What would it be like to stand out from the competition in a way that customers choose you over everyone else? And what if you were to raise your prices, and they still kept coming?That’s what uniqueness can do to your product or service. Yet most of us seem to know what makes our product or service better than competition.But the customer doesn’t know.
So they go elsewhere.
Some cheaper. Somewhere crappier. But they don’t come to you in the droves you’ve imagined.

Until now, that is…
Because here’s a complete step-by-step uniqueness course with notes, audio and yes, the precise system to get to uniqueness. So far every book you read tells you about uniqueness. Well, this course doesn’t just yak about it. You get the system to get to your uniqueness.But find out for yourself what this is all about:
http://www.psychotactics.com/home-study/positioning-strategy-how-to-get-to-uniqueness
Warm regards,
Sean

The Concept of the Star and the Supporting Cast When Creating Uniqueness

The Concept of the Star and the Supporting Cast When Creating Uniqueness

Every movie you’ve ever watched has a common factor.

You have a star. And you have the supporting cast.

The star gets all the lines. The star gets to do most of the work. The star is the focus. So what does the supporting cast do? The supporting cast comes in from time to time. They have smaller roles, fewer lines. And they have to do less work.

Your sales page is a lot like that

On your sales page, you’ll have the features and benefits of a product or service. And you’ll have bullets. And this is your supporting cast. They highlight the things that the customer needs to know about the product or service. But then there’s the star. That star is the uniqueness of the product or service. That star gets a lot more space. A lot more explanation. And in fact, the script writer (that’s you) may re-write the entire story to make that star shine.

When you understand the concept of the star and the supporting cast, you don’t go nuts with your uniqueness.

You realise that each of them have a role to play. And that while getting to uniqueness does involve a ton of slaughter and sacrifice, it’s not that you’re getting rid of all the benefits and features. It’s not that your bullets are totally worthless. It’s just that they cannot occupy the lead role. That lead role has been taken.

You can go right ahead and give every bullet, feature and benefit a small role to play, and they’ll play it well. But leave the big chunk to the uniqueness.

But let’s take an example (even if it’s slightly flawed)

If you ask anyone why they’re buying the Apple 4s, the answer is compressed down to one word: Siri. Siri on iPhone 4S lets you use your voice to send messages, schedule meetings, place phone calls, and more.

Ask Siri to do things just by talking the way you talk. Siri understands what you say, knows what you mean, and even talks back. So ask someone why they’re buying a 4s and they know the star; they know the uniqueness factor that’s causing them to upgrade.

The Concept of the Star and the Supporting Cast When Creating Uniqueness

Can you spot the flaw? Of course you can. The client knows the uniqueness, but Apple is trying to stuff it all in one graphic. And worse, the real star is being booted to the bottom of the page

But waitasec…there are all those other features

There’s the  8-megapixel resolution and a custom lens with a larger f/2.4 aperture. There’s the Dual-core A5 chip. Let’s not forget Video recording in 1080p HD. And other such features. And yes, blah, blah, blah dee blah. They’re all playing their roles. But it’s a supporting cast, not the lead role.

Siri takes the lead role. Siri is the reason that the 4s stands out like it does. And so it will be with every single iPhone that ever comes out from Apple. There will be a star that will drive home the uniqueness. And there will be the supporting cast.

And the twain shall meet

But the star should get the most lines. The most drama.  The most ad time. Nothing should eclipse the uniqueness of the product. Because once the client knows why they want to buy a product, they’re no longer comparing phones. They’re now comparing iPhones. They’re actually rejecting the iPhone 4, even though it’s half the price or even less. And they’re choosing the iPhone 4s for that one reason only.

What’s your one reason?

Every product or service has several great features and benefits. And you’ve always been afraid to choose your uniqueness, because it would mean that you’d have to slaughter and sacrifice the rest. Technically yes, the slaughter and sacrifice is needed, but only while you’re making sure the uniqueness gets the star role.

Once that role has been established, you can bring back the rest of the features and benefits to play their role as supporting crew. And that makes a good movie. And a good sales page. And they’ll all live happily ever after.

The End. The Concept of the Star and the Supporting Cast When Creating Uniqueness

P.S. Did you find this article interesting? Write your comments here. I would love to hear from you.

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What I’ve found, though, is that people are serious and they contribute. That makes a big difference.

I’m also enjoying the general discussions. As a solo entrepreneur, most of my days are spent in isolation. And because of where I live, I’m not around other similarly-minded folks. The forum is
inspiring; it’s great to be in contact with other people who are working hard on their businesses and facing so many of the same challenges I am.

Thanks for your work to keep this forum going.

Joe Thoron, Eastsound, WA, USA
Find out more at http://www.5000bc.com/

 


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Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

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Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly it’s April, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
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Uniqueness: The Importance of the Mundane and the Seemingly Uninteresting

Uniqueness: The Importance of the Mundane and the Seemingly Uninteresting

Most of us struggle with the uniqueness of our products or services. And the reason we struggle is because we look for something exciting to showcase in our products and services. And all we seem to come up with, is the mundane and uninteresting.

You’ve probably heard of the ‘Twelve Apostles’ in Australia

Australia has close to six million tourists every year. About 1.7 million of these visit the site of the ‘Twelve Apostles’. Now before you get all reverential here, recognise the fact that there’s nothing very holy about this place. The Twelve Apostles are just a collection of limestone stacks off the shore, as you drive down the Great Ocean road.

And it wasn’t even known as the Twelve Apostles to begin with. The site was known as ‘the Sow and Piglets’ until 1922— after which it was renamed to The Apostles for tourism purposes. This formation eventually became known as the Twelve Apostles.

What’s ironical is that there aren’t twelve limestone stacks

There are just nine. And one of those nine is eroding, so there will soon be eight. But do those 1.7 million visitors care? No, they don’t. Because to them, that venue is unique. Someone decided that in a continent full of wonders, they could isolate one attraction and draw millions of tourists to see these rocks. Yup, just rocks.

In effect, Australia took the mundane and made it extremely exciting.

The Mona Lisa at the Louvre in Paris, is no less mundane

There are over 35,000 pieces of art at the Louvre. While the Mona Lisa is certainly not mundane by itself, it’s just one of the many splendid art pieces in the Louvre. And in that respect, it’s pretty mundane. So why does everyone rush to see the Mona Lisa? You know the answer already, don’t you?

At some point, someone decided to highlight the Mona Lisa. And to play down 34,999 other works of art. That’s akin to having a product with 35,000 features and playing down all but one feature. And that’s what gets the attention.

Your product or service has the same problem

For instance if you look at a membership site—any membership site, there are a ton of reasons why you should join and continue to be a member. Let’s list a few, shall we?

1. Reliable answers to business problems

2. Timely responses, 24/7

3. Access to the owner

4. Accountability

5. Access to practical “how to” resources

6. Access to a community of like minded business people

7. Access to helpful members

8. A safe environment

9. A getting things done environment

10. Privileged access to courses and products

So what’s so interesting about that list?

There may well be some interesting aspects to that list, but equally there may be something really mundane. For example: Access to practical “how to” resources. Now surely that is very mundane. Every membership site on the planet promises the very same thing. You sign up and you get access to all of these wonderful tutorials and goodies.

That’s kinda interesting, yet boring, eh? And yet it could very easily be made the uniqueness factor by describing why these ‘how to’ resources are better than anything that you may possibly find elsewhere.

So let’s take a crack at it, shall we?

“How To” Resources at XYZ Memberships Site: If you join a membership site, you’re sure to run into hundreds of articles and tutorials. The difference between what you see in XYZ Membership site and elsewhere, is that the articles don’t just tell you ‘how’ to do something, but ‘why’ that something works.

Once you understand ‘why’ something works, you’re able to replicate that concept successfully across all your products or services—and know why it’s failing and how to fix it and make it work for to your benefit.

Let’s take another example

Let’s say you own a tea company. And there are half a dozen, probably two dozen reasons why someone should buy your tea. Well, what are you going to choose? You’re more than likely to go for something that seems dramatic. But for the purposes of this exercise, let’s just choose the mundane.

1. Tea must be pesticide and chemical-free.

2. Tea must be this year’s crop.

3. Dry leaf should look fresh and shiny.

4. Aroma must be fragrant and lively.

5. Liquor must never be cloudy.

6. Mouth feel must have the right umami.

7. Teas must be priced appropriately.

Now there are some exceptionally interesting and some terribly mundane points as well. But they”re only mundane because of a lack of explanation. If we were to choose the concept of ‘cloudiness’ of tea, for instance, we could go on an don about how the tea liquor needs to be clear. How a pure leaf will create a translucent, almost shimmering cup of tea. Why a cloudy liquor is often a sign of low quality—and hence, not so tasty teas.

You see what’s happening here?

The key factor isn’t the feature. You could take a mundane feature, give it oomph and it forces your audience to take notice. And the beauty is that you can do it with any feature. Yes, you’re more likely to be tempted to use the best possible feature, but in reality there is no ‘best’ feature.

Any feature, no matter how mundane, can be given the spotlight. What makes the feature stand out is the story behind the feature; the reason why that feature is so very important.

When choosing or creating the uniqueness factor for your products or services, you may work long and hard to find something amazing.

Well, stop the search.

Look for the mundane instead.

And elevate that ‘so-called’ boring feature to one of great prominence by describing why that feature is so very important.

And that will get you one step closer to uniqueness.

Yeah, just like that!

P.S. What is your uniqueness? And how have you made it prominent? Share you story here.

 

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(Without Even Needing To Fill A Form) Before 26 May 2012


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In case you missed this special go to this page.
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Also, look out for two more freebies on Saturday.


“I’m one of those people who has a lot of trouble spending money on training and education, so paying a fee to join a forum was a big step for me.

What I’ve found, though, is that people are serious and they  contribute. That makes a big difference.

I’m also enjoying the general discussions. As a solo entrepreneur, most of my days are spent in isolation. And because of where I live, I’m not around other similarly-minded folks. The forum is
inspiring; it’s great to be in contact with other people who are working hard on their businesses and facing so many of the same challenges I am.

Thanks for your work to keep this forum going.

Joe Thoron, Eastsound, WA, USA
Find out more at http://www.5000bc.com/

 


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) You already know that 80% of a sales letter depends on your headline.
So what’s the remaining 20% that causes customers to buy? Find out more

2) Do You Often Hit A Wall Called ‘Writers Block’?
Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

3) Do you know that visuals immediately improve your sales conversion?
Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

4) Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

5) Chaos Planning
Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly it’s April, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.


The Black Belt Presentation Series: Learn how to make your Presentation stand out from every other presenter.



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