Why You Should Avoid Catering Your Presentation To A Specific Audience

Presentation Mistakes

I once stood up before a bunch of insurance company sales people.

My brief was simple: I was supposed to get them to understand why customers buy and why they don’t. In other words, I could have simply done my presentation on The Brain Audit, and be done with it. But no, I wanted to do more. I wanted to personalise the whole darned presentation.

And so I dug for examples from the insurance industry

I did my research, I spoke to the company hiring me. In short I slaved to get something that would endear me to the audience. And you can see where this is going, right? Yup, it all went horribly wrong. All that work landed me in a bigger soup than if I’d just done what I always do—and that is to leave the presentation 99.5% alone!

As I stood up there and gave that audience example after example, I sensed I wasn’t getting the rah-rah I was expecting

And in retrospect, that makes perfect sense doesn’t it? There I was, an outsider trying to tell them what worked in the insurance industry. They obviously knew more than me. But it gets worse. In many cases, they knew of that specific case-study and they disagreed with the method that was employed. Or the case-study was from Belgium and they shook their heads saying “it would work in Belgium, but never in New Zealand”.

In short I’d walked into a trap of my own making

I’d tried to over-personalise my presentation and in doing so, took them away from the main topic of The Brain Audit. They would have been far more interested in why customers buy and why they don’t, than listening to case-studies from this “industry alien”.

But do you not bring up a single case-study?

It’s not that you completely ignore them either. You put in a few keywords. eg. If I were speaking to those who were in selling bananas, I would put in a few key words to get them to know that this applies to bananas as well. But I would go no further. The deeper you get into their territory, the quicker you end up in quicksand.

Temptation creeps in

Let’s say you’re presenting to an audience of coaches and the next day you’re presenting to people who train dinosaurs. Well, the first day in your speech, you say: “And today we’re going to find out how “coaches” can keep customers. The coaching industry is like any other. And we need to understand why customers buy and why they don’t. And for coaches today, in an overcrowded market this information is incredibly crucial.

Now you’ve put in enough keywords for the audience to know that you are on their side. It’s time to go on with the rest of your “regular presentation” and regular case-studies. And the next day if you’re speaking to dinosaur trainers, well, you bring up “dinosaur trainer” keywords as well.

Temptation creeps in

You want to do your due diligence. You want to do better. You want to bring in case studies. But you’re the outsider. Stay outside, and do the presentation that they signed up for in the first place.

Yup, avoid the temptation of catering.

All it does is get you into a load of trouble.

 

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Our conversion rate now is in the high 80%.

The Secret Life of Testimonials: Simple, Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales

The most common and powerful tool I use to help our clients is to walk them through your Testimonial System. Our conversion rate now is in the high 80%. This story is short but very real.  Thank you for continuing your work over the years.

Derek Antonievich
On Time Marketing Group, Australia
Judge for yourself: Testimonial Secrets


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Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done

New! Critical Website Components: How to write compelling content for your key web pages
Free! Excerpt of The Brain Audit: Why Clients Buy And Why They Don’t 



Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room-without turning anyone off?

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Announcing! BlackBelt Presentations Series: How To Make Your Presentations Come Alive

 

When you make a presentation, wouldn’t it be amazing to completely control the room–without turning anyone off? Wouldn’t you like to create a presentations that enthrall, hold and move an audience to action?

So what causes presentations to come alive?

There are three core components to presentations:
1) Design control.
2) Delivery control.
3) Event control.
And it’s hard to find information that gives you a step-by-step

systems of what you should do to dramatically improve your

presentation.

Until now, that is.

Presenting Black Belt Presentation Series–A step-by-step system to presentations
You will find that the ‘Black Belt Presentations’ series will exceed your wildest expectations (It’s gotten rave reviews).

Judge for yourself at:
http://www.psychotactics.com/products/black-belt-presentations

Warm regards,

Sean

P.S. Have a look and judge for yourself. http://www.psychotactics.com/products/black-belt-presentations


Here is what Justin Deaville has to say
“I had to give a presentation this afternoon and had to rewrite half of it as a result of reading your book.”

“I taught presentation skills for many years, so didn’t think I had

much to learn. I was wrong, wrong, wrong! These guides are

fantastic, the best I’ve seen – and I’ve read lots about

presentations and performance.

Sean doesn’t cut corners or skip difficult issues. He shows you

everything you’ll need to create and give EXCELLENT presentations.

The material’s easy to follow– it’s so well written– and is packed

with practical tips. You could read these books a dozen times and

still be learning. They are a great investment.”

Plus the 13-box system is such a simple system for explaining how

to structure a presentation. My only complaint is that I was giving

a presentation this afternoon – and had to rewrite half of it as a

result of reading your book.”

Justin Deaville
exCEO, Wordtracker
London, United Kingdom


 


Why I Gave Up Video (And Why I’m Back)

I didn’t give up video. I just got busy.
You know how it is, right? You want to do something and then you make this grand list. Then you do a bit of it. And you do some more. And some more. And you get results. And then you do a spectacularly stupid thing.

You give up.

Why? No one knows for sure.
It’s not like video took me more time. In fact, the first time I tried to make a video  (I say ‘try’ because I didn’t complete the video) it took me five hundred and eight hours.

A couple of hours of shooting. Five hundred hours of wondering how lousy I’d look and sound on video. And the remaining six hours of fiddly stuff with the right location, video software etc.

And yet a month or two later, we were shooting eight videos in an hour

My wife, Renuka would set up the camera. We’d switch on the lights. And I’d speak. No teleprompter, no reading from notes, nothing. Just speak as though I was speaking to a client.

And no, I didn’t start out that way. I needed the notes. I bought several teleprompters. Then I just got sick of the whole process and decided to shoot whatever I possibly could in an hour.

And it was ONE take. No second take. The less I focused on getting it right vs. getting it done, the more videos got done. But it was killing me to script, shoot, edit, put titles, keywords and upload the darned thing.

Bah! It was maddening!

So I hatched a devious plan

I contacted some kids at school and one of them showed up, keen to edit video. Now he had standing instructions. He had to show up and never call. If he called, I might say something like, “Let’s skip this week”.

But if I knew he was going to show up anyway, I had to do the video. This kid was free for a few hours on Saturday. I’d shoot on Friday evening. One hour. Eight videos. Back to back. Then I’d need a beer or two.

But something happened along the way

I can’t remember the details. But I just gave up. The kid stopped showing up. Maybe we went on vacation. Maybe something else happened. The point is irrelevant. I just stopped.

And that’s what we all do. We stop. And we have to be re-booted once again.

So towards the end of last year, I did the reboot. I contacted a film school and asked if their alumni were keen to earn some money. Three eager beavers showed up. Two dropped out, for some weird reason. One stayed. And he’s good!

And that’s a lesson in itself

Trying to do the scripting, shooting, editing, rendering, uploading is a pain in the you-know-where. You may start off all nice and cheery, but projects come in the way, chaos drops in for a beer and then all hell breaks loose. You definitely need to get some help. Kids all around you know how to use video cameras and all tend to have access to a computer.

And they will spend the time editing, if not shooting for you. I prefer to have the person shoot and edit, and that is the best way going forward. That way you, the talent, can do the prep work, get time to actually comb your hair and then do the shoot in one go.

Or two. Or five. But at least once it’s done, it’s done.

And so in two weeks, we’ve shot seventeen videos

Not in two weeks. In two hours, just spread over two weeks.

I know, I know. It sounds intimidating, but it’s only intimidating for the first five hundred and eight hours. After that you get used to the camera, just like you get used to looking at yourself in the mirror.

And while those seventeen videos were the live videos, I got back into making screencasts as well.

Now screencasts are tough

They’re tough if you want to do a good job. Because there’s no live movement, you have to create the movement. So a 30-minute video may have as many as 250 slides and about 300 specific animation points.

That’s not counting the audio recording time (which I do separately) and the graphics. And the layout. And the storyboard. And another half a dozen things. In short, it’s a big production. And often people make screencasts because they’re afraid of facing the screen.

Well don’t let me stop you from making 250 slides

But if you’re looking to save time, live action is better. It’s quicker. It’s easy to trash and start again. You may not like your voice and you may not like your face on video, but you’ll get over it sooner or later.

Probably later, but there will be a time (and get this) when you will actually like your voice. No, I’m not kidding. Then people have to shut you up.

The final reason for making screencasts is because you have something that needs to be demonstrated, rather than spoken.
Of course the final reason is just that you’re a sucker for punishment—which I am.

So why did I start making video again?

Well, I don’t know about you, but if there’s a page of pretty pictures to see, or if there’s text on this page, I still click on the video. I will head to an Apple.com page in all its glory and pretty pictures and bingo—it’s the video I want to see.

Well-made video is quicker and more tidy than reading a whole page of stuff. But let’s say you’re not me. Let’s say for instance you are the one who reads the pretty words and loves the pictures. Well, then there’s a good chance you have a client like me.

A client who wants videos. And so you may not be a video-watching person yourself, but your client loves video. And so you do what’s needed.

So I buckled down and made the video.

I made live videos.
I made screencasts.
And I’m going to make videos for our sales pages as well. Because I know they work. I’ve seen them work on painful people like me, who don’t want to read or see pretty pictures. And while it’s not always fun to get the script, the topics and do all that speaking etc., it’s now a lot of fun to see the finished product. It’s nice. It’s effective.

And more importantly, it doesn’t take five hundred and eight hours any more.

Phew!

P.S. If you’re considering video, and especially if you’re considering screencasts, you will want to look at Black Belt Presentations. It really, really helps.

Do you have a similar story to share? Post it here.


Next Step
“There are marketing books and there are marketing books – I bet there are not many you have read many times over?

The Brain Audit really teaches you the art of persuasion because it gives an insight into how people’s brains work. I have used the principles in writing WebPages, writing articles, making presentations, networking, negotiating and even writing submissions for a judge!

But the best bit about the Brain Audit is that it actually works.The principles are easy to understand.

Would I recommend it to people serious about getting on in business? Absolutely.

mikes

Michael Smyth, approachablelawyer, Auckland
Judge for yourselfThe Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy And Why They Don’t


I was wary of signing up and paying for a forum or another membership site

“If you suspect that your business could be bringing in a lot more revenue but you don’t have a clue how to make that happen without hype or hassle, 5000bc is a must-have resource.

I honestly didn’t see what 5000bc could offer me that I couldn’t get from Sean’s books. Besides, how could a bunch of people – most of whom are not business experts – help me build my business?

I joined anyway because the price was right and I wanted the information that came with the premium membership. ;-)

The information and support I received from Sean and my fellow “cavers” about a single Web page was directly responsible for selling $10,000 worth of books in less than two weeks.

Unlike many Web communities, 5000bc members are active and to the point. Sean keeps adding content that drills down to specific problems in business and then shows you how to solve them.

Try it. You won’t regret it.”

5000bc: Small Business Marketing Memembership| Molly Gordon testimonial
Molly Gordon, Master Certified Coach
Shaboom Inc, USA

Judge for yourselfHow 5000bc can make your business succeed.


Products: Under $50
You already know that 80% of a sales letter depends on your headline.
So what’s the remaining 20% that causes customers to buy? Find out more

1) Do You Often Hit A Wall Called ‘Writers Block’?
Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

2) Do you know that visuals immediately improve your sales conversion?
Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

3) Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

4) Chaos Planning
Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly it’s January, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.

5) Nothing bugs you more than a painful client.
A client who hassles you at every step of the way. Learn how to use the power of the ‘six critical questions’ to get incredible testimonials—and attract clients that make every day an absolute joy.


Presentation Series! Black Belt Presentations: How do you create presentations that enthrall, hold and move an audience to action?

 


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Free vs Paid Seminars—Which One Is Better?

Free vs Paid Seminars—Which One Is Better?

Around the year 2006, we used to have free seminars.
Monthly.

We had room for 40 people

And 40 people would show up. Every single time. Not always the same 40 people, but the room was always full.

The interesting thing about these seminars, is that we weren’t selling anything

We weren’t upselling anything. We didn’t have leaflets. There was no mention of Psychotactics at the seminar. No products, no catch, nothing. The seminars were purely altruistic. We wanted to give back to the community that helped us when we got to New Zealand.

But it was irritating to watch how people would show up, or not, depending on the weather. Or depending on some silly excuse.

It’s not like we didn’t have a penalty

We had two lists. One was a premium list. They got the first opportunity to get seats at the seminar. If you attended the seminars you signed up for, you’d get to stay on this premium list.

If you didn’t show up, you’d get bumped off into the not-so-premium list. And stay there until there was space on the premium list. And so, people mostly made sure they stayed on the premium list.

Now, as we mentioned, there was no price

Well, not for the participants anyway. We had costs. We rented the room (the cost was over $1000 per year), we got our equipment. Both Renuka and I had to take time out of our very busy schedules to get prepared and head to these seminars. And as you probably know, even a 1-hour seminar takes about a day of preparation and execution when you add the hours and recovery time.

So if you had a full house would you continue the seminars?

Most people would. We didn’t. We realised that ‘free’ is a poor incentive. Most of us jump at the thought of how free attracts, but free is only a great attraction and conversion device. It’s not always a great consumption device.

And consumption is where things are at. If the customer doesn’t show up, it doesn’t matter who signed up. And in our case, we were bugged that people would simply skip sessions when it involved something as important as their business.

Interestingly, this almost never happened when there was payment involved

When I first started out, I could have given free seminars, but for some daft reason, I didn’t. Instead about 15 people signed up to a series of seminars that would last all year.  Now they weren’t paying a lot. The fee was about $75 per session. And yet, they all turned up for session after session. This was despite all the odds.

You see we didn’t have money to hire any rooms

So we’d ask people for rooms that were free or at least very economical. We started with free rooms. And so we’d have a room for maybe two or three sessions and then we’d have to move. And the group moved with us, without a fuss.

We probably moved venues thrice in that year and they kept showing up. Of course, not all showed up. Some dropped off, but the bulk of them were still around when we did our last seminar (at yet another free venue).

So what is the moral of this story?

To me, at least, the moral is to charge. Today’s public is so inundated with free stuff, that it’s hard for people to justify showing up unless they’ve paid something. So what is that something? Well, I charged $75.

And you may want to try that figure. Or you may want to try $39. That’s low enough and high enough at the same time. If it’s just $10, it’s easy to discard the $10. If it’s $39, it’s more likely that they’ll show up.

And that’s what I’d do if I wanted to have a free workshop series again

I’d take a fee of say, $500 upfront. Then I’d refund the money if the participants showed up to all (or at least a minimum number of events). That way they could get their money back, and my goal would be achieved.

You may not have such an altruistic goal. You may want to have a seminar as a way to get people to the event, so you can sign them up. And that’s perfectly fine.

But my advice would be to charge a fee

Free is too cheap.

P.S. Do you have a seminar story to share? Write it here and I will respond

Why You Need The Brain Audit


“I purchased The Brain Audit and have increased my clientele two-fold.”

The Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy And Why they Don't

As a Results Coach, I am always looking for ways to up my own game and provide more value for my clients. I came across some promotional material for the Brain Audit and was impressed almost immediately! I started reading through Sean’s PsychoTactics material and was even more impressed.

His conversational approach, his practical strategies that WORK, and his dedication to making marketing and customer attraction easier and more understandable make me not only a customer but a fan!

I purchased The Brain Audit and have increased my clientele two-fold. Buy The Brain Audit…Read it…Apply the principles…Watch your business grow!

Sean is a breath of fresh air. His strategies, principles, and advice work! I highly recommend The Brain Audit.

Dawn Langerock ~ Results Expert and Coach
Synergy Coaching and Consulting, Austin, TX, USA

Read how The Brain Audit can help you
http://www.psychotactics.com/brainaudit


Products Under $50


1) Announcing! How To Put That Zing-Kapow In Your Articles (With StoryTelling)
So what are the elements of a well-told story? And why have they been playing hide and seek with us for so long?

2) You already know that 80% of a sales letter depends on your headline.
So what’s the remaining 20% that causes customers to buy? Find out more

3) Do You Often Hit A Wall Called ‘Writers Block’?
Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

4) Do you know that visuals immediately improve your sales conversion?
Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

5) Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

6) Chaos Planning
Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly half the year is over, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.


Black Belt Presentations
How to create presentations that enthral, hold and move an audience to action.



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How To Get People To Introduce Themselves At A Workshop

How to get people to introduce themselves at a workshop

When you think about it, why would you get your audience to introduce themselves? When you think of pet hates, introducing oneself at a workshop is easily one of the most hated of all activities. So why bother getting the audience members to introduce themselves?

Or you could take a totally different route, and avoid the frustration of everyone introducing themselves. You could make the person sitting next to them do the introduction.

So how does this system work?

In effect, no one does their own introduction. All they do is talk to the person next to them. So if X and Y are sitting next to each other, X introduces Y. And in turn, Y introduces X.

Why is it important?

The reason why we hate introducing ourselves, is because we have to talk about ourselves. That alone is kinda boring for at least half the audience. But the second biggest reason is that the spotlight is on us.

We have to talk about ourselves and make ourselves look good. We’re doing a tightrope act where we can’t undersell ourselves—or boast too much. This is all too much to bear, and we often end up goofing it up. This makes us even more nervous the next time we have to introduce ourselves.

But the nervousness gets reduced when someone else is introducing us

This is because that ‘someone’ can not only boost us a bit, but they don’t need to have to remember anything. You see, when they spoke to you, and asked you questions about yourself, they would have made little notes. When they are called upon to introduce you, they simply refer to those notes. So they don’t have to remember anything and hence the nervousness goes away as well.

But confusion still abounds if you don’t have structure to the introduction

Just asking X to introduce Y is not a good idea. When we conduct live Psychotactics workshops, we make sure that there’s a clear structure to follow. e.g. The questions that X needs to ask Y would be something like:

- Your name

- Your profession

- Your favourite food

That gives the participants a clear structure to work with. They’re not randomly asking each other questions.

But can’t we just skip the introduction session if it’s so hated?

Yes you can, but you’ll find that your audience gets very disoriented. The introduction is a very vital part of who we are as humans. We like to know about each other, even if we don’t particularly like to introduce ourselves to a crowd.

But create a bit of excitement around the introduction and it’s not hated at all. Be sure, however, not to do silly things like making the person stand when doing the introduction. Let them be relaxed and they’ll thank you for it.

Introductions are hateful because of the way they’re conducted

If you turn it around and make Y introduce X, and X introduce Y, you get a much better result. It takes the nervousness out of the situation, allows us to refer to notes—and best of all it gets X and Y to know each other a lot better. Plus it enables the entire group to get to know everyone else, so don’t be surprised if you get a ton of laughs and a relaxed atmosphere.

And this sets the tone for the rest of the workshop

Your group is now introduced to each other, have had a few good laughs and are now ready to learn. What was once a pet hate is now a wonderful experience. And all it took was a few tweaks and voilà, your workshop is well on its way to rocking and rolling!

P.S. What techniques have you used to get people to introduce themselves at your workshop? And if you attended a workshop, what technique did the presenter use?

How to get FREE: Two Brain Audit Audio Files
(Without Even Needing To Fill A Form) Before 26 May 2012


brainaudit_book1

In case you missed this special go to this page.
http://www.psychotactics.com/blog/free-brain-audit-audio-files/

 


“I’m one of those people who has a lot of trouble spending money on training and education, so paying a fee to join a forum was a big step for me.

 

What I’ve found, though, is that people are serious and they contribute. That makes a big difference.

I’m also enjoying the general discussions. As a solo entrepreneur, most of my days are spent in isolation. And because of where I live, I’m not around other similarly-minded folks. The forum is
inspiring; it’s great to be in contact with other people who are working hard on their businesses and facing so many of the same challenges I am.

Thanks for your work to keep this forum going.

Joe Thoron, Eastsound, WA, USA
Find out more at http://www.5000bc.com/

 


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) You already know that 80% of a sales letter depends on your headline.
So what’s the remaining 20% that causes customers to buy? Find out more

2) Do You Often Hit A Wall Called ‘Writers Block’?
Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

3) Do you know that visuals immediately improve your sales conversion?
Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

4) Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

5) Chaos Planning
Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly it’s April, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.


The Black Belt Presentation Series: Learn how to make your Presentation stand out from every other presenter.



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Why You Should Not Repeat What’s On The Slides

Why You Should Not Repeat What’s On The Slides

 

You know those presenters who read out from slides? You know how you detest them? Well there’s a reason.

And it comes all the way from Hollywood

The Hollywood saying goes like this: If the scene shows you what the scene is supposed to show you, you’re in deep shit.

What does that mean?

If there are two lovers over a candlelit dinner and they’re saying: “I love you” then the scene is showing you what the scene is showing you.

So in effect it’s treating you like an idiot. You already know that the candlelit, soft scene is about love. That’s already been clearly shown to you. Now if the actors repeat it, then it’s a complete waste of space. And a waste of your time.

Love can be shown in different ways

So in an episode of Frasier, Daphne and Niles are chopping vegetables and singing a song. And they chop to a rhythm. There’s love written all over the scene. Unabashed love on Niles’ face. Unknown love on Daphne’s face. But they never say I love you. They chop veggies.

The same applies to anything whether it goes from cartoons to magazine layouts to presentations

The graphic needs to accompany the text. Not be a replica of the text. If the graphics are a replica of the text, it’s boring for the reader/listener/viewer.

So when you read off the points in your slides, you’re causing the listener/viewer a ton of grief. For one, you’re breaking Hollywood’s rule–that’s never good. And secondly you’re boring me, because here’s what happens in my brain.

When I see text, I read it

When I read it, it may appear to be a silent reading but in fact my ear is processing the information before sending it to my brain.

You see this more evidently in older folk and young children. They read aloud so that their ear processes the information before sending it to their brain. The same applies to you and me–except that we don’t read aloud. But we’ve still “read aloud” and then along comes the presenter and reads it aloud again.

That’s like saying something twice. That’s like saying something twice

It irritates the reader/viewer. It irritates the reader/viewer. And in a few minutes it turns the reader/viewer off completely. And in a few minutes it turns the reader/viewer off completely.

Get the point?

P.S. Do you have a Presentation Story? Share your Story here.

Product Offers: Links you should visit


“I wasn’t sure Sean would have anything new to say or would offer
advice that would be easy to apply.

brainaudit_book1

I was also concerned that I would be deluged with a lot of information and sales pitches that I would get overwhelmed and not be able to implement anything.

But after I checked out his site I was impressed by all the free offerings. And it seemed so well organized I didn’t feel overwhelmed or confused. I tried a few ideas out and was so happy with the positive results that I bought the Brain Audit.

After reading (and re-reading!) the Brain Audit I felt like a blindfold had been lifted off my eyes. It made so much sense and I kept thinking how it seems so obvious but no one has ever put all the pieces together like this before.

I am happily communicating with patients much better, and attracting more of my ideal type of patient.

So if you want to break through to get better results and are willing to do a little painless work, then do yourself a favor and get the Brain Audit.

Tyme Gigliotti, Licensed Acupuncturist
Baltimore, MD, USA
Read more at http://www.psychotactics.com/brainaudit


In your small business, how can you get reliable answers to your complex marketing problems?
Find out more at http://www.5000bc.com/

 


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) You already know that 80% of a sales letter depends on your headline.
So what’s the remaining 20% that causes customers to buy? Find out more

2) Do You Often Hit A Wall Called ‘Writers Block’?
Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

3) Do you know that visuals immediately improve your sales conversion?
Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

4) Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

5) Chaos Planning
Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly it’s April, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.


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Public Speaking: Why It Can Torment You Forever (If You Let It)!

Public  Speaking Why It Can Torment You Forever

Have you ever been to a primary school play?

There they are, all the kids, all keen to play their part.

And then one kid forgets his part

He stands there dumbfounded. Unable to speak. Frozen in fear. The words seemingly circulating in his brain somewhere.

I was that kid!

Except I wasn’t five years old. I was thirty-three years old and I was giving my first presentation ever on The Brain Audit. Except at that point, it wasn’t even called The Brain Audit. I was, at least in my mind, just giving a one hour seminar.

And about twenty minutes into that one hour, I froze

Nothing. I couldn’t remember a thing. There were twenty five people in the room looking right at me, and my mind was blankety-blank. And time doesn’t just slow down in these moments. It shuts down. You feel suffocated, unable to move or even twitch an eyebrow.

My wife, Renuka saved me that night

She told the audience we were going to take a 10-minute break. Imagine that. A 10-minute break in the middle of a presentation. But there I was ten minutes later, my brain all rebooted. And I gave my first presentation on The Brain Audit ever. But that was my first ever event. Sure I goofed up. But then I was fine.

Fine until Wellington, that is

I had to speak to this group of insurance agents. One hundred and fifty of them. And I was being paid the grand sum of $1500 plus airfare + expenses. And though it was at least three-four years later and forty presentations later, I did it again.

I became that five-year old on the stage again

My 45-minute speech was done in twenty. And I fled the stage. I was mortified because I forgot what I was supposed to say. And I knew in that moment, that I really should stop trying to be a speaker. Heck I might as well go and hide behind my computer and never show my face again.

Moments of doubt creep up in everyone’s mind

But this isn’t a moment. This is a crisis. You’re being mangled, pulverised and every bone in your body is telling you to eject, eject and eject.

And yet you stay on course. You feel the anguish, the shame, the utter doubt. And then when you’ve done enough of your self-pity, you wake up the next day (or several days later) and you get back to doing what you need to do.

What I needed to do was go back to Wellington

Back to that same hotel. Back to that same stage. Back to face a fear so strong that even though I wasn’t going to be speaking to the same audience; or even speaking on the same topic; or the fact that several years had elapsed. I was still petrified of—get this—the very room!

But that’s what you have to do

The only way to face the fear is to face it. You pick yourself, dust yourself off and start all over again. That’s what marks out the people who succeed vs. the people who don’t.

The people who don’t make excuses. They say: I tried this stuff. It didn’t work. Well hello there, try it again. And again. At least so that you get over the fear. If for no one else, then at least for yourself.

Because the moment of doubt doesn’t care

As you get better at what you do, you have more challenges. Some challenges you breeze through. Some make you feel five again. Fearful. Blank. Unable to go on. But you must go on, because if you do there is that so-called pot of gold waiting at the end of the rainbow.

Remember The Brain Audit presentation I was telling you about?

Well, at that point I hadn’t written The Brain Audit. But after that event, someone came up to me and asked me for notes. Of course I didn’t have any notes. But she persisted. So I wrote out the notes a few days later and sent it to her in a PDF. Those notes became the basis for The Brain Audit as it is today.

And today that one book alone has sold over $500,000 worth of copies to date.

One book. Half a million dollars!

In my wildest dreams I could not have envisioned a turnaround like that. But it could have gone the other way as well. I could have given up. Decided to go into early ‘retirement’. And that would be the end.

Doubt shakes our very core

When you’re doing a course. Learning a new skill. Doing something different or scary. And the longer you wallow in self-pity, the more stupid excuses you make, the more that doubt is going to chew you up and spit you out.

Be that five year old

Freeze in fear if you have to. Take your ’10-minute break.’

Then come back to fight.

And win!

P.S. So what was your scariest presentation moment? And how did you overcome it? Share your experience here

Product Offers: Links you should visit


“I first bought the Brain Audit in 2002. It was 32 pages long.
And I thought it was the best damn book on copywriting I had read

brainaudit_book1

It laid down the entire sequence of elements that any successful salesletter or presentation needs to cover to make the prospect say “yes!?”

I really thought that Brain Audit could not be improved upon.

But year after year, Sean has been proving me wrong. He has improved upon it. And improved upon it. And improved upon it.

Sean’s added more details to the Brain Audit. More stories and analogies. Better graphics (and fun cartoons!). He has used every teaching trick possible to make sure that you not only understand the sequence of elements needed to make people buy… but the sequence soaks into your thinking pattern too.

Today, the Brain Audit 3.2 is 157 pages long! And its the best* book on persuasion you will ever read!

* Until Sean comes out with version 4.0 a year or 2 down the line. But you really can’t afford to wait a year or 2 to take advantage of the Brain Audit, can you?

Ankesh Kothari – Biztactics, USA
Read more at http://www.psychotactics.com/brainaudit


In your small business, how can you get reliable answers to your complex marketing problems?
Find out more at http://www.5000bc.com/

 


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1) You already know that 80% of a sales letter depends on your headline.
So what’s the remaining 20% that causes customers to buy? Find out more

2) Do You Often Hit A Wall Called ‘Writers Block’?
Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

3) Do you know that visuals immediately improve your sales conversion?
Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

4) Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

5) Chaos Planning
Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly it’s April, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.


NEW PRODUCT! Learn How To make your Presentation stand out from every other presenter.



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Announcing: Three Special Offers From 13-16 March 2012



Offer 1: The Brain Audit +  Special Goodies worth $158

Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy And Why They Dont

*If you’ve wondered why customers back away at the last minute, both online and offline, you’ll find the specific answers on the page below.

*If you have a website or intend to sell something off your website, you’ll avoid all of these mistakes, that if not fixed, will drive away customers.

Judge for yourself. I think you’ll be really pleased with what you  see.
The Brain Audit Special Offer



Offer 2: Join 5000bc without going on the waiting list

The Motto of 5000bc Membership: Be kind, Be helpful or Be gone

Imagine you asked a question. And you needed the answer to that question. e.g. How to create Strategic Alliances. In 5000bc, you have two options. You find detailed articles that tell you how to go about things. Or if the articles don’t exist, I write them for you (Try finding that kind of service online).

I just wanted you to know that 5000bc is now at  the point where we have to restrict entry. However from  13-16 March 2012, you can join 5000bc without having to endlessly wait in the wings. And only a limited number will be able to join. Judge for yourself.
Join  5000bc without going on  the waiting list .



Offer 3: How To Get The Black Belt Presentations Series  (Installments Special)

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How To Tell When Your Audience Has Had Enough

How To Tell When Your Audience Has Had Enough

Can you really tell when your audience has had a full feed of information?
Amazingly the answer lies in the eyes and ears of the participants.

Look first at the eyes

And if you look at the eyes, you’ll think you’re the best speaker on the planet. You’ll think your audience is rapt with attention. This is because the audience will be looking at you with amazing concentration.

Experienced speakers call this the ‘deer in the lights syndrome’. When the audience is staring back at you, it’s not because they’re over-excited with your information. In fact they’re tired.

Those eyes staring back at you are their attempt just to keep their concentration going. Eyes that are fluid, easy-going are ‘learning eyes’. Eyes that stare back at you are eyes that are tired and are forced to focus—hence the ‘deer in the lights’ stare. And the eyes are only one indicator.

The other indicator is the ear

Look at the ears of the members of the audience. Are they bright red or a deep shade of pink?* If they are, it means your audience has had enough. The more tired a participant gets, the more the ears seem to get a deep colour. This gives you fair warning that you need to back off; that the audience needs a break. Or that you just need to stop the workshop for the day.

And if the ears and eyes don’t give you the feedback you need, the sigh of relief will do just that.

Announce that you’re going to have a break and you’ll feel that wave of relief go through the room.

And this may be contrary to what you expect. As a diligent trainer you want to really give your audience the most possible information. And you really want them to learn.

But learning is not done by force-feeding. When the eyes and the ears start to give you signals, you have to be in a position to watch for those signals and react accordingly.

But what if you’re on the last day of your workshop and there’s a ton of learning still to go?

Well you need to plan better for the next workshop, so that your audience never gets to this point in the first instance. But let’s say you’re stuck in a workshop and there’s no way out.

C’mon, there’s always a way out. You can offer to send them a video or a follow up course. In today’s world you can teach anything via the Internet, and if you can’t finish, then offer to send follow up stuff later. And the audience will be grateful.

Their eyes will blink again.
Their ears will turn drop a few shades of red.

And they’ll consider you to be a brilliant trainer, because you detected the tiredness in the room.

And you, you know that you didn’t really detect any tiredness. All you did was look at their eyes. And their ears.

And you knew. You just knew.

*The ears trick is a little trickier with darker skin. The darker the skin, the less the indication on the ears. In which case either look for the lighter skin in the room, or just focus on the eyes.

Do you know other  ways to tell when your audience has had enough of information? Share your workshop idea here.

 

Can you really tell when your audience has had a full feed of information?
Amazingly the answer lies in the eyes and ears of the participants.

Look first at the eyes.

And if you look at the eyes, you’ll think you’re the best speaker on the planet. You’ll think your audience is rapt with attention. This is because the audience will be looking at you with amazing concentration.

Experienced speakers call this the ‘deer in the lights syndrome’. When the audience is staring back at you, it’s not because they’re over-excited with your information. In fact they’re tired.

Those eyes staring back at you are their attempt just to keep their concentration going. Eyes that are fluid, easy-going are ‘learning eyes’. Eyes that stare back at you are eyes that are tired and are forced to focus—hence the ‘deer in the lights’ stare. And the eyes are only one indicator.

The other indicator is the ear

Look at the ears of the members of the audience. Are they bright red or a deep shade of pink?* If they are, it means your audience has had enough. The more tired a participant gets, the more the ears seem to get a deep colour. This gives you fair warning that you need to back off; that the audience needs a break. Or that you just need to stop the workshop for the day.

And if the ears and eyes don’t give you the feedback you need, the sigh of relief will do just that.

Announce that you’re going to have a break and you’ll feel that wave of relief go through the room.
And this may be contrary to what you expect. As a diligent trainer you want to really give your audience the most possible information. And you really want them to learn.

But learning is not done by force-feeding. When the eyes and the ears start to give you signals, you have to be in a position to watch for those signals and react accordingly.

But what if you’re on the last day of your workshop and there’s a ton of learning still to go?
Well you need to plan better for the next workshop, so that your audience never gets to this point in the first instance. But let’s say you’re stuck in a workshop and there’s no way out.

C’mon, there’s always a way out. You can offer to send them a video or a follow up course. In today’s world you can teach anything via the Internet, and if you can’t finish, then offer to send follow up stuff later. And the audience will be grateful.

Their eyes will blink again.
Their ears will turn drop a few shades of red.
And they’ll consider you to be a brilliant trainer, because you detected the tiredness in the room.


And you, you know that you didn’t really detect any tiredness. All you did was look at their eyes. And their ears.

And you knew. You just knew.

*The ears trick is a little trickier with darker skin. The darker the skin, the less the indication on the ears. In which case either look for the lighter skin in the room, or just focus on the eyes.


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1) What do your customers think? What would make them buy?
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Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

4) Do you know that visuals immediately improve your sales conversion?
Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

5 Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

6) Chaos Planning
Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly it’s February, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.


NEW PRODUCT! Black Belt Presentations: How do you create presentations that enthrall, hold and move an audience to action?


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Why You Need To Design Learning Around The Exit Sign

Why You Need To Design Learning Around The Exit Sign

How many days does it take to recover from conducting a workshop?

Back in the year 2001, it used to take me about a week. Three days after the workshop, I’d be utterly exhausted. And it would be another four days before I could really crawl back to work at normal speed. And it was because I was doing something terribly wrong.

I designed my workshops around speaking

You know what I mean. The kind of workshop where the speaker loves his voice and slides so much that they keep going and going. And going. And going. As you can tell all this ‘going’ had a downside. I would get exhausted and the audience was not far behind. In fact I noticed one curious thing as well. The more information I gave them, the more they kept looking at the ‘exit’ signs.

It makes no sense: Why look at the exit signs?

If you ask any of the participants the reason why they’re there at the workshop, you get a quick answer. They’re there to learn, to absorb and to cram as much information as they can.

Yet the moment you say something like “…And now we’ll go for a short break” you feel this sigh of relief. And if you’re watching, you’ll see a glimmering smile on the participant’s faces as well. It’s clear that they liked being outside the class more than being inside.

So we designed our workshops around the exit sign

But how do you do that? If the goal of the participant is to learn, how do you just let them roam free? That would cause a lot of folk to be upset and ask for their money back, right?

Not at all. You see there’s a difference between letting an audience roam free, and letting them roam free with a purpose. When you roam free with a purpose, it’s because you have an assignment to complete. You’re still out of the range of that blah-blah speaker, and you’ve got an assignment to complete with a group of other participants.

We call this our 1:1:1 system

In the first ’1′ part, I speak for about 20 minutes. Then I give the participants an assignment. They spend the next ’1′ part doing the assignment. They then come back to the room, and we discuss issues relating to the assignment in the final ’1′ part. So instead of being chained to their seats, they actually learn. And more importantly it gives the brain some time to relax.

The brain doesn’t work too well with constant stimulation.

All constant stimulation does, is force the brain to keep alert. This turns out to be counterproductive both for the trainer and the participant. But given time to exit the room at regular intervals lets the brain process the information, and then come back refreshed.

The fact that the concepts learned are discussed by the group also enables the brain to break up the learning at one level. And when the participants come back and discuss the concepts, the learning is broken up even further, allowing for even greater assimilation.

Incredibly, participants loved this system of 1:1:1

Participants would often mention that they learned more in the corridor than in the classroom itself. And as a trainer that should be like music to your ears, because it means your concepts are going home, instead of bouncing right over the participant’s heads.

So we took this concept a whole chunk further

We started taking a whole day off. Yup, if the exit sign works, why not go whole hog? So when we conducted The Brain Audit workshops in the U.S. and Canada, we had a three-day workshop with a treasure hunt on Day 2.

Why would you pay for a three-day workshop, pay for an extra night in the hotel, plus food costs when the real workshop is only two—and not three days in reality? It’s because you learn better. And the results were fantastic. The more we allowed the participants to play with the concepts, the more they learned.

And there was a big upside for me as well

Because I stopped yakking so much I didn’t have ten thousand slides to prepare. And I was less tired. I found, to my surprise, that not only could I do two-day workshops, but once was able to do a seven-day workshop from one end to another. What’s important to note is that at the end of seven days, the participants were fresh and still raring to go.

Hmmm, makes sense in retrospect, eh?

We go to a workshop to listen, absorb and learn. And if the teacher just yaks, then all we’re doing is listening. There’s very little absorption and almost negligible learning. And yet if the workshop is designed around the exit sign, we all have the opportunity to listen, absorb and learn.

So the next time you feel like yakking endlessly, take a look at that exit sign.
Because you can be sure your participants are looking at it anyway!

P.S. People love the exit sign more than you think. If your workshop is supposed to end at 5pm, tell the audience that if they finish their assignments on time, everyone can go home by 3:30pm. Then watch their faces as the smiles light up. Try it. You’ll be amazed at how your participants adore the exit sign.

But don’t believe what I have to say. Just look at your audience when you talk about the exit sign. That’s all the reassurance you’ll ever need to know that the exit sign works better than you ever imagined.

Now it’s your turn. Share your business workshop experience or horror story here


Next Step
“There are marketing books and there are marketing books – I bet there are not many you have read many times over?

The Brain Audit really teaches you the art of persuasion because it gives an insight into how people’s brains work. I have used the principles in writing WebPages, writing articles, making presentations, networking, negotiating and even writing submissions for a judge!

But the best bit about the Brain Audit is that it actually works.The principles are easy to understand.

Would I recommend it to people serious about getting on in business? Absolutely.

mikes

Michael Smyth, approachablelawyer, Auckland
Judge for yourselfThe Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy And Why They Don’t


I was wary of signing up and paying for a forum or another membership site

“If you suspect that your business could be bringing in a lot more revenue but you don’t have a clue how to make that happen without hype or hassle, 5000bc is a must-have resource.

I honestly didn’t see what 5000bc could offer me that I couldn’t get from Sean’s books. Besides, how could a bunch of people – most of whom are not business experts – help me build my business?

I joined anyway because the price was right and I wanted the information that came with the premium membership. ;-)

The information and support I received from Sean and my fellow “cavers” about a single Web page was directly responsible for selling $10,000 worth of books in less than two weeks.

Unlike many Web communities, 5000bc members are active and to the point. Sean keeps adding content that drills down to specific problems in business and then shows you how to solve them.

Try it. You won’t regret it.”

5000bc: Small Business Marketing Memembership| Molly Gordon testimonial
Molly Gordon, Master Certified Coach
Shaboom Inc, USA

Judge for yourselfHow 5000bc can make your business succeed.


Products: Under $50
NEW!
You already know that 80% of a sales letter depends on your headline.
So what’s the remaining 20% that causes customers to buy? Find out more

1) Do You Often Hit A Wall Called ‘Writers Block’?
Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

2) Do you know that visuals immediately improve your sales conversion?
Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

3) Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

4) Chaos Planning
Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly it’s March, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.

5) Nothing bugs you more than a painful client.
A client who hassles you at every step of the way. Learn how to use the power of the ‘six critical questions’ to get incredible testimonials—and attract clients that make every day an absolute joy.


NEW PRODUCT! Black Belt Presentations: How do you create presentations that enthrall, hold and move an audience to action?


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The Amazing Power of Incremental Steps (And Why It Develops Client’s Skills Rapidly)

The Amazing Power of Incremental Steps (And Why It Develops Client’s Skills Rapidly)

A few weeks ago I went for swimming classes

It’s not that I can’t swim, but I’ve only ever learned the breaststroke. And if you’re a swimmer, the breaststroke doesn’t get you anywhere in a hurry. And so I went to learn freestyle. Except that’s when I ran into a whole lot of trouble.

Why would you run into trouble, you may ask?

There’s nothing to freestyle. You move your arms in sequence through the water and use your legs to propel you forward. Except that it wasn’t so easy for me at all. There I was clinging to a float, trying to get the sequence right, not kicking my legs—and generally failing miserably. So I was asked to stop swimming and told to walk in the shallow end of the pool instead.

First I started with the walk and moved my arms.
Then I swam and moved my arms and my legs.
Then I was miraculously swimming.

And the reason for this ‘miracle’ is obvious

It’s called incremental steps. So yeah, we all understand the concept of incremental steps. We all feel the need for incremental steps and yet the moment we give out information we get sudden amnesia. Your presentation for instance, won’t cover one point in great detail. Instead it will kangaroo-hop all over the countryside.

If we’re dealing with a client one on one, we try to ram down everything in that one consulting session. If we’re teaching a course, the information comes out like a freakin’ firehose. And as we’ve already established, we utterly detest being treated in this fashion, when we’re customers.

Or do we?

No we don’t. But yes we do. And let’s find out the reason for this paradox. When we sign up for something as customers, we want the maximum knowledge/advice we can get. So the more bullet points we encounter, the more features/benefits we read, the more excited we get. But then something weird happens.

We can’t consume all of this information, no matter how simple. The information becomes a curse. And so it’s at this point that we want the ‘teacher’ to take us ahead one step at a time.

Which is why you need to map out your information to have incremental steps

And the way to have incremental steps is to literally take one step at a time. So if for instance, you wanted to get folks on a forum in preparation for a course, you’d actually follow steps like this:

Day 1: Register in the forum.
Day 2: Read instructions.
Day 3: Post your photo.
Day 4: Introduce yourself.
Day 5: Meet your group.

Sounds inane? Sounds like these steps are too small?

Well, you’ll be surprised how many people get stuck at the first few steps themselves. It’s incredibly important to have very tiny first steps. If your client slips and falls on the first steps, then any further progress is at risk. But if they move ahead, a sense of achievement is created, enabling them to stay on course.

But every situation is different

A course is different from a presentation. A presentation is different from a consulting session. So how do you go about creating the steps? The way to do the breakdown is to list all the possible steps. Then list all the possible sub-steps. And then get your client to go about the every step, then every sub-step, before moving to the next step.

In swimming terms this would mean getting the arm movements right step by step. Then the leg movements. Then the head under water. Then the breathing—and so on. Every step would need smaller sub-steps and inane as it may sound to you, this is the fastest method for the customer to learn a new skill or concept.

Fastest? It sounds deathly slow!

It is slow, but think about my swimming lesson. If I consistently goofed up for every one of those 30 minutes, what would I feel at the end of the lesson? You got it: I’d feel lousy. I’d feel like I wasn’t capable of learning to swim freestyle. And I’d do what all of us do on a consistent basis: I’d waddle right back to my comfort zone. And I’d never develop that particular skill.

At Psychotactics we teach clients to develop complex skills

One of our courses is cartooning. Another is article writing. Another is copywriting. If you take apart these courses, you have hundreds of moving parts for every skill. And you have great resistance, because often people think they need to be born writers or born artists. And that’s utter nonsense. If you are able to break up a skill into hundreds of parts and get the person to master one part at a time, they just master it. And they magically become talented (just like I magically learned the freestyle).

There’s another advantage to this incremental system of teaching

If a student follows incremental steps, doing just one step at a time, they can’t go very much off tangent. If they go off track, you can pull them back and they’re back on track. If they attempt to do seventeen things at a time, you’ve got real trouble. And if you’re teaching seventeen people at the same time, then you’ve got a Category 5 hurricane blowing your way! What’s worse is that the students don’t learn as well. And they blame themselves, blame you, or worse believe it’s a lack of talent.

It’s not talent at all.
It’s a lack of teaching ability.
The ability to teach with incremental steps.
One splash at a time.

Using Incremental Steps leads to your clients developing skills rapidly. Click here—To share how you used incremental steps with your clients and what happened.

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“Before I found the Brain Audit I was looking into many other 
programs to learn more about how to grow my blog into a successful
 business.”

“I bought other ebooks and joined forums but the Brain Audit and
 5000bc beat them all. I now feel my search for the best advice has 
ended and I’m full throttle into implementing what I learn.”

Brain Audit Testimonial: Matthias Marschall

Matthias Marschall, SuccesfulEngineering,
Munich, Germany

Find out how —The Brain Audit can help you


I was wary of signing up and paying for a forum or another membership site.

“Because of previous less than impressive experiences with sites that are all sizzle and no substance run by flaky gurus. Sean’s free advice and articles are so good I didn’t think that he could come up with something even better. He does.

When I joined, I found a wealth of practical information and advice on all sorts of topics related to small business, marketing (both online and offline), interviews with experts, critiques of members’ websites and their marketing material. Sean is there answering queries and questions, sometimes even turning advice that
into an article.

Free resources available to members which you don’t read or hear about outside 5000bc, not to mention free access to articles which later become paid products are added bonuses of being a member. You also get information about classes and workshops which Sean is planning before the general public is informed.

I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend 5000bc as a valuable resource to help you with your business and the free coaching.”

5000bc testimonial: StephenTrevarthen
Stephen Trevarthen
Melbourne, Australia

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NEW! You already know that 80% of a sales letter depends on your headline.
So what’s the remaining 20% that causes customers to buy? Find out more

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2) Do you know that visuals immediately improve your sales conversion?
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4) Chaos Planning
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5) Nothing bugs you more than a painful client.
A client who hassles you at every step of the way. Learn how to use the power of the ‘six critical questions’ to get incredible testimonials—and attract clients that make every day an absolute joy.


NEW PRODUCT! Black Belt Presentations: How do you create presentations that enthrall, hold and move an audience to action?


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The Moment of Doubt (And How It Led to $500,000 In The Bank)

Presentation Skill Stories

Have you ever been to a primary school play?
There they are, all the kids, all keen to play their part.

And then one kid forgets his part.

He stands there dumbfounded. Unable to speak. Frozen in fear. The words seemingly circulating in his brain somewhere.

I was that kid!

Except I wasn’t five years old. I was thirty-three years old and I was giving my first presentation ever on The Brain Audit. Except at that point, it wasn’t even called The Brain Audit. I was, at least in my mind, just giving a one-hour seminar.

And about twenty minutes into that one hour, I froze

Nothing. I couldn’t remember a thing. There were twenty five people in the room looking right at me, and my mind was blankety-blank. And time doesn’t just slow down in these moments. It shuts down. You feel suffocated, unable to move or even twitch an eyebrow.

My wife, Renuka, saved me that night.

She told the audience we were going to take a 10-minute break. Imagine that. A 10-minute break in the middle of a presentation. But there I was ten minutes later, my brain all rebooted. And I gave my first presentation on The Brain Audit ever. But that was my first ever event. Sure I goofed up. But then I was fine.

Fine until Wellington, that is

I had to speak to this group of insurance agents. One hundred and fifty of them. And I was being paid the grand sum of $1500 plus airfare + expenses. And though it was at least three-four years later and forty presentations later, I did it again.

I became that five-year old on the stage again

My 45-minute speech was done in twenty. And I fled the stage. I was mortified because I forgot what I was supposed to say. And I knew in that moment, that I really should stop doing trying to be a speaker. Heck I might as well go and hide behind my computer and never show my face again.

Moments of doubt creep up in everyone’s mind

But this isn’t a moment. This is a crisis. You’re being mangled, pulverised and every bone in your body is telling you to eject, eject and eject. And yet you stay on course. You feel the anguish, the shame, the utter doubt. And then when you’ve done enough of you self-pity, you wake up the next day (or several days later) and you get back to doing what you need to do.

What I needed to do was go back to Wellington

Back to that same hotel. Back to that same stage. Back to face a fear so strong that even though I wasn’t going to be speaking to the same audience; or even speaking on the same topic; or the fact that it several years had elapsed. I was still petrified of—get this—the very room! But I stood up, gave my speech. And got a rousing applause.

And that’s what you have to do

The only way to face the fear, is to face it. You pick yourself, dust yourself off and start all over again. That’s what marks out the people who succeed vs. the people who don’t.

The people who don’t, make excuses. They say: I tried this stuff. It didn’t work. Well hello there, try it again. And again. At least so that you get over the fear. If for no one else, then at least for yourself.

Because the moment of doubt doesn’t care

As you get better at what you do, you have more challenges. Some challenges you breeze through. Some make you feel five again. Fearful. Blank. Unable to go on. But you must go on, because if you do there is that so-called pot of gold waiting at the end of the rainbow.

Remember The Brain Audit presentation I was telling you about?

Well, at that point I hadn’t written The Brain Audit. But after that event, someone came up to me and asked me for notes. Of course I didn’t have any notes. But she persisted. So I wrote out the notes a few days later and sent it to her in a PDF. Those notes became the basis for The Brain Audit as it is today.

And today that one book alone has sold over $500,000 worth of copies to date.

One book. Half a million dollars!

In my wildest dreams I could not have envisioned a turnaround like that. But it could have gone the other way as well. I could have given up. Decided to go into early ‘retirement’. And that would be the end.

Doubt shakes our very core

When you’re doing a course. Learning a new skill. Doing something different or scary. And the longer you wallow in self-pity, the more stupid excuses you make, the more that doubt is going to chew you up and spit you out.

Be that five year old.

Freeze in fear if you have to. Take your ’10-minute break.’
Then come back to fight.

And win!

So tell me what was your moment of doubt? And how did you overcome it?
Share your experience below


How to get a FREE 30-Page Excerpt of The Brain Audit
(Without Even Needing To Fill A Form) : Before 14 August 2011

brainaudit_book1
In case you missed this special go to this page
The Brain Audit Download
Also, look out for two more freebies this SUNDAY.


Products: Under $501) Do You Often Hit A Wall Called ‘Writers Block’?
Learn how the core elements of outlining can save you from the misery of writing your next article.

2) Do you know that visuals immediately improve your sales conversion?
Learn how to create drama and curiosity and help improve your web page conversion with visuals.

3) Do your websites, brochures, presentations, etc… confuse your clients?
Put some sanity into your design, even though you are not a designer?

4) Chaos Planning
Year after year you sit down and create a list of things you want to achieve. Then suddenly it’s March, and you’ve not really moved ahead as you’d expected.
Learn Why Most Planning Fails: And The Critical Importance of Chaos in Planning.

5) Nothing bugs you more than a painful client.
A client who hassles you at every step of the way. Learn how to use the power of the ‘six critical questions’ to get incredible testimonials—and attract clients that make every day an absolute joy.


NEW PRODUCT! Black Belt Presentations: How do you create presentations that enthrall, hold and move an audience to action?


Next Step: To get more Psychological Tactics
Subscribe: :
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