Why Did You Buy? A Deceivingly Important Question To Ask Clients

Why Did You Buy? A Deceivingly Important Question To Ask Clients

Whenever we sell a product or service, we forget an important question.

The question: Why did you buy?

So why is this question so very important?

It’s important for several reasons

1) It validates the purchase decision
2) It gives you an understanding into the trigger
3) You can manage expectations better

First let’s start with the purchase decision

Whenever we buy something, we’re usually faced with a bit of buyer’s remorse. This buyer’s remorse kicks in, while higher in a pressure situation, nonetheless shows up in a low-pressure situation as well.

And in asking the client why they bought a product/service or a course, you’re asking them to write down their reasoning.

The purchase moment is very emotional

While all of us give a logical explanation why we bought into a product, the reality is that the purchase is emotion-based. We know this to be true, because if two people offered exactly the same product/service, you’d choose one over the other, purely on emotion.

But there’s logic too

And when customers write back, they give you both the logic and the emotion. And in doing so, they confirm to themselves that they’ve made the right decision. It’s one thing to think about making the right choice. When you write it down, you really have to think it through. And that makes a customer more likely to ratify their decision to buy.

This is no doubt good for you, as a seller. However it’s also great for the customer, because once they’re clear about why they bought a product/service, it strengthens their resolve to consume it. And when they consume it, they get greater value from their purchase.

If that were the only reason, that would be reason enough. But there’s a second reason as well and it’s called “the trigger”.

So what’s the trigger all about?

When we write sales copy, we’re not exactly sure which part of the copy resonated most with the customer. And yet, when you get a response from your customers, you’ll find there’s a sort of clumping up towards certain points.

You’ll find over time, that customers seem to be repeating the same thing over and over again. And that “same thing” may well be in your headline. Or it might not.

Take for instance, a book on “how to buy a car”

This marketer was sure that he’d done all the testing possible. But just for the heck of it, decided to ask clients why they bought the book. And there, in the middle of his bullet points, was the prime reason. They bought the book because he was “showing them how to buy a car at $50 over the dealer’s price”.

That information alone was worth the price of the book many times over. But the marketer wasn’t aware of the power of that bullet point. Once he was aware, he could take that bullet point and move it to the headline—thus ensuring even greater sales.

And when you ask for the trigger, customers will come up with other reasons too…

For example, when we asked customers why they signed up for the Info-products workshop, here are some of the points.

- What should be in our ‘Company bible’?
- How to systematically break that down into information products.
- Where do we start?
- What’s the process that we can follow?
- How do we know what people will pay for and how much they will pay?
- What’s the best way to test before we build?
- Where to start and stop and how to know when it’s time to break off into a new product?
- How to put the information together so it’s helpful and people want more.

I don’t know if you noticed, but that list reads amazingly like bullets

Or potential features and benefits. And once you have an insight into what the customer really wants, you can go back to your sales page and check if you’ve covered these points.

You would also need to write at least a few e-mails or leaflets to sell your product or service. The points you receive from your client can be the basis of future e-mails and leaflets.

But there’s a third point why “why did you buy?” is important

The third reason is simply to manage expectations

Remember when you visited a foreign country?

You read all the books, saw tons of photos and yet, when you got there, it was somehow different.

I remember going to the Taj Mahal in Agra when I was about 18 years old. I’d seen photos of the Taj, hundreds of times. Yet, when I was there, it was so much bigger, so much fancier than I’d expected.

And your product can be fancier or less fancier than clients expect.

The problem is often not rooted in the content

It’s rooted instead, in the expectations. Once a client gets to the end of a service, or reads through a product and doesn’t find what they want, they feel cheated.

They’ve spent time and money—but mostly a ton of energy. And they’re less likely to be trusting of your products and services in future.

And you really want them to trust you wholeheartedly.

This is why you need to ask the question

The question brings up their needs and you can either head it off at the pass or include it in your material. Heading it off at the pass, is not easy. You have to let the client know that the results they seek will not be available. And you let them know what they’re going to get, instead.

Often a client is very happy with the fact that you’ve taken the time to speak to them, and whether they decide to go ahead or not, they will retain that positive memory of you in future. And trust will be gained.

However, in many cases, you may not be covering what they seek

If you’re offering a service or physical, you can tag on an extra bonus (though that may not always be possible).

However, if you’re offering information, you don’t have to change your core information structure. E.g. Let’s say someone has read the book, “The Brain Audit“.

On going through their expectations, you find that they have questions that have not been covered in The Brain Audit.

So do you tweak the book? No, of course, not.

Instead you can tag on with a follow up PDF, audio or video—much like a FAQ (frequently asked questions).

Yup, that will solve the customer’s dilemma and give you the chance to create additional information without having to tamper with your core product or service.

The “why did you buy” question is very important because:

- It validates the purchase
- Gives you a ton of selling points and trigger points, that you can use in your sales material.
- Helps manage expectations, heading off issues at the pass, or adding bonuses that solve the customers problems.

However, there are exceptions to every rule

You see this sometimes on sites like iTunes or Amazon.

There’s this petty, idiotic customer who wants to pay nothing and wants the world. He’ll say something like, “I’m rating this product as a bad product because it is worth 99 cents, instead of $1.99.

Really?

This kind of petty customer is never going to be the customer you need or want. They will treat the product or service with disdain, ask for too much and you can never, ever manage their expectations.

Of course, you’re welcome to try but it will end in tears—that’s for sure. So avoid these painful customers at all times.

The good customers—the ones that are going to stay around for a while

They will be happy to answer your question about “why” they bought your product or service. And in doing so, you’ll get a bounty of information and goodwill.

Cool, eh?


Be Kind, Be Helpful or Begone: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website

How to create a membership site

“The specific feature I liked most about this book was that the information that went into creating this PDF came from actual hands-on experience and not theory or wishful thinking!”
I’d recommend this book to anyone starting or already running a membership site… perhaps even a blog.

Because of Sean’s actual experience running a site and learning through trial and error… He has developed crucial insights into what makes a successful membership site as well as how to make it interesting, consumable and most important of all… participatory for all those who join.

Jeffery Ellis, USA
Judge for yourself: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website

 


Top Selling Products Under $50


Announcing! Dartboard Pricing: How To Increase Prices (Without Losing Customers)

Website Series: How to create a trusting experience for your website visitor
Testimonial Secrets:
Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy (And Why They Don’t)
Sales Pages:
How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


5000bc: The place to get reliable answers to your complex business problems?
Black Belt Presentation: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
Membership : How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 



Special Offer: Website Components-How To Create Compelling Pages On Your Website + Special Bonus (Valued at $45)


When you buy Website Components-How To Create Compelling Pages On Your Website on the  13th, 14th, 15th or 16th June 2015, you’ll also get–’How  To Maximise The Power Of Bonuses’ (worth $45) absolutely free.


Website Components Special

Do you often wonder if your home page, about us page or client
acquisition page is working at less than its full potential? These
three pages are critical to any website, and yet we often put the
content together on these pages hurriedly.

Well, “hurriedly” is the wrong word to use.
Instead we spend hours trying to get just the right content; just
the right look. And then, after hours, maybe days of frustration,
we put together something that seems right.

But is it really compelling?
Can it be more compelling?
What’s really missing? And is there a simple way to fix it–while
retaining your own voice, your own personality?

Introducing: The Website Component Series
Find out for yourself how you can spruce up the home page, about us
page and the sign up page. We deconstruct existing pages and then
in true Psychotactics-fashion reconstruct them step-by-step.

And the Special Bonus: How To Maximise The Power Of Bonuses
In this 40 page booklet you will learn
- The Psychology of Bonuses
- How to Find your Bonuses
- How to Create a One-Of-A-Kind Bonus
- How to Avoid the Bonus Trap
- Why Unbundling Makes a Big Difference to How your Product is Perceived.
- And more…

Judge for yourself at: http://www.psychotactics.com/website-secrets

Warm regards,
s-
P.S. This product is very critical if you’re just sitting down to
write your pages, but it’s even more critical if you have these
pages up, and you’ll like to improve them to help you convert more traffic.
Judge for yourself at: http://www.psychotactics.com/website-secrets

P.P.S. This special offer is only valid until 16th June 2015. Have a look
and make a decision based on what you read.
http://www.psychotactics.com/website-secrets


Article Starter: Why The Ending Matters Most Of All

Article Starter: Why The Ending Matters Most Of All

You’ve probably never heard of Grant Elliot.

But on the night of March 24, 2015, over 1 billion viewers paid close attention as he hit the winning shot in the semi final of the World Cricket Tournament.

But what of the players that came before him? What about their contributions? Doesn’t every player and contribution matter?

It does matter, but what really matters is the “winning shot”.

When writing the “First 50 Words” in your article, the winning shot is the very last thing you say. It’s the one thing that your reader is going to remember as they sink their teeth into the rest of the article. So does the ending really matter that much?

Let’s take four examples, with almost identical text—then change just the ending.

And you’ll see for yourself how the story takes a completely different turn.

Let’s say we want to write the article on five completely different angles:

- persistence
- stuck
- underdog
- potential
- missed opportunity

Note how the start is exactly the same, but how the ending changes it all!

========
“First 50 Words” for the term: Persistence

Four years and three months.

When I look at the curry leaf tree outside my window, I can’t believe I’m seeing over two hundred leaves. Because for four years and two months, all it had was a couple of sparsely populated stalks.

In fact, we were so sick of the stupid plant that we were ready to throw it away.

But the curry leaf plant was teaching us a lesson.
A lesson of persistence. And untapped potential.

The same applies to your blog that seems to get very little, if any amount of traffic.

========

“First 50 Words” for the term: Stuck

Four years and three months.

When I look at the curry leaf tree outside my window, I can’t believe I’m seeing over two hundred leaves. Because for four years and two months, all it had was a couple of sparsely populated stalks.

In fact, we were so sick of the stupid plant that we were ready to throw it away.

But the curry leaf plant wasn’t stuck.

We were.

We didn’t realise that we were trying to grow it in the wrong soil for the past four years or so. The moment we changed the soil and the position, the plant went nuts.

Your blog too can go nuts, with the right change of soil and position.

So what causes blogs to get stuck?

========

“First 50 Words” for the term: Underdog

Four years and three months.

When I look at the curry leaf tree outside my window, I can’t believe I’m seeing over two hundred leaves. Because for four years and two months, all it had was a couple of sparsely populated stalks.

In fact, we were so sick of the stupid plant that we were ready to throw it away.

But the curry leaf plant wasn’t stuck.

It was just playing underdog.

While all the other plants grew and shrivelled in the changing season, the curry leaf plant took its time.

Time is a critical component when you’re trying to get clients to visit your blog. You’ll feel like the underdog forever, and then one day—boof—it all happens.

So what’s the journey from underdog to boof?

========

“First 50 Words” for the term: Potential

Four years and three months.

When I look at the curry leaf tree outside my window, I can’t believe I’m seeing over two hundred leaves. Because for four years and two months, all it had was a couple of sparsely populated stalks.

In fact, we were so sick of the stupid plant that we were ready to throw it away.

So often, we throw away things at the edge of their potential, don’t we?

And sure it’s easy to say something fulfilled its potential when all is fine. But how can you tell in advance? How can you tell that, for instance that a seemingly puny blog will attract tens of thousands of readers a day

========

“First 50 Words” for the term: Missed opportunity

Four years and three months.

When I look at the curry leaf tree outside my window, I can’t believe I’m seeing over two hundred leaves. Because for four years and two months, all it had was a couple of sparsely populated stalks.

In fact, we were so sick of the stupid plant that we were ready to throw it away.

And yet, if we’d thrown it away, we’d have missed out on an opportunity to have one the most fragrant plants in our garden. Pretty much like we miss out on the opportunity with our blogs. We get too impatient too quickly and lose out on the big opportunities.

So what are the big opportunities anyway? And how do we avoid making the mistake of moving too quickly?

========

So there you go, five different angles:

- persistence
- stuck
- underdog
- potential
- missed opportunity

One story and different endings.

It’s the ending that really matters

It’s the winning shot. The “Grant Elliott” of your articles.


“I have a business and attracting new customers require a continuous effort. I am always searching for ways to take my business to the next level.”

Story Telling

The Story Telling Mini Series gave me the road map for my website. 
Demet Kitis, Canada​
Judge for yourself: 
Story Telling Mini Series

 


Top Selling Products Under $50


Announcing! Dartboard Pricing: How To Increase Prices (Without Losing Customers)

Website Series: How to create a trusting experience for your website visitor
Testimonial Secrets:
Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy (And Why They Don’t)
Sales Pages:
How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


5000bc: The place to get reliable answers to your complex business problems?
Black Belt Presentation: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
Membership : How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 



Do We Really Need To Start With Why?

Do We Really Need To Start With Why?

In Tokyo, under the Ginza railway station, there is a famous restaurant run by Jiro.

The spotlight is obviously on Jiro, because of his Michelen-star status.

Among all the restaurants in the world, few restaurants get the privilege of getting an extremely high rating in the food industry. And in this unassuming 10 seats restaurant, Jiro doesn’t work alone. Instead there are a host of helpers that seem to be almost invisible.

Some of them simply chop the veggies.

Some of them take out the garbage.

Some of them make sure the rice is right.

Why would you?

Why would you go about cutting vegetables and moving sticky rice for years on end, with no perceptible reward in sight. Sure, you may well become a sushi chef, but it’s a long ten year journey. So why bother? And at least until recently, a large part of the East didn’t understand the West.

The West was obsessed with why.

Because WHY brings a sense of deadline

When you were really young, you never questioned why, did you?

Why did you learn to speak your native language?

Why not learn Cantonese instead?

A lot of our very early learning is not dominated by why. And with the East, just as in the West, the WHY does come up. Kids grow up to be curious and ask WHY.

But in the East, they’re told to simply obey and the results will come. So the goal becomes not so much to find the answer, but to find the teacher. And the teacher has a system, and the results come from that teacher and system.

Psychotactics courses are built around this almost mythical system of “wax on-wax off”

If you ever watched the “Karate Kid”, a movie from the 80′s, you’d have run into the central characters: Daniel (the kid from California) and Mr.Miyagi, an immigrant in the U.S.

Daniel wants to learn karate, but only because he gets beaten up so much.

He has a goal—a WHY.

And instead of taking him though the drills that the neighbourhood karate class employs, Mr. Miyagi makes Daniel sandpaper his deck and paint the walls.

Psychotactics courses seem to have this same bizarre system of getting clients across without necessarily explaining why.

WHY is a natural question, but not a particularly important one

When you ask WHY, it may well be to satisfy a curiosity. But often the WHY comes more from the urgency.

Why are we doing the course this way?

Why is the book built that way?

Why, Why and Why?

And even when the answer is satisfactory, the urgency remains.

But if you’re a sushi chef, the goal is to learn from the teacher. The WHY slides a bit into oblivion.

The Renaissance in Italy, flourished because of the absence of WHY

Some of the most amazing work was created in the guilds of the Renaissance, a time when you simply followed your guild master and learned skills that would help you later. And while all this stuff about sushi-chefs, article-ninjas and Renaissance is important, it’s also important to note that WHY does help.

Knowing WHY you’re doing something gives the something a sense of purpose.

Does that help us achieve our goals?

Not necessarily. We step into a task with great vigour and then we lose our way, despite knowing WHY we’re supposed to do something.

When people stand up and say that Apple creates amazing products, they attribute it to WHY.

But that’s rarely the case.

Often Apple will create something that’s so bizarrely useful (like the magnetic power cord) simply because a concept like that captures the imagination of the designer.

There are additional costs and resources required to design something brand new—and zero revenue. Your share prices don’t go up. Your salary or status doesn’t change. Apparently nothing changes, except there it is—an amazing magnetic power cord.

WHY is nice.

It helps us understand purpose. But it can be overrated. And we don’t know WHY.

P.S. Instead of WHY, find the teacher.

P.P.S. Ten years ago, I wrote an article on ‘The Power of WHY’. That still stands. This is just the other side of the same coin.


How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Learn How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

“This product will help you avoid writing traps as well as anticipating and handling objections when they arise in the reader’s mind”

“I would recommend this product, because it will quickly show you how to develop thoughts and ideas into a structure capturing the important stuff to write about. Not only that, it will help you avoid writing traps as well as anticipating and handling objections when they arise in the reader’s mind.”

Duncan MacIntyre

Office Chair Advice, Derbys UK

Judge for yourself:  How to speed up article writing with simple outlines.


Top Selling Products Under $50


Announcing! Dartboard Pricing: How To Increase Prices (Without Losing Customers)

Website Series: How to create a trusting experience for your website visitor
Testimonial Secrets:
Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy (And Why They Don’t)
Sales Pages:
How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


5000bc: The place to get reliable answers to your complex business problems?
Black Belt Presentation: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
Membership : How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 



$2500 Free Workshop: How To (Finally) Get On The List

Web_Cover

Last week we announced about the $2500 Brain Alchemy Masterclass Workshop
we were giving away. And you were promised that you’d get a follow up email.

Well, tah…dah…here’s the follow up email.

And the link to read more details and get on the list is at:
http://www.psychotactics.com/free/brain-alchemy-goodies/

 

 

 

Have fun :)
Warm regards,

Sean
P.S. It’s free. But only for the next seven weeks. And there is a waiting list.


Why Rewriting Is A Mistake

Why Rewriting Is A Mistake

There is an ancient saying that goes like this…

You can’t step into the same river twice.
That’s because the river has changed.
And you’ve changed.

And similarly when you try to re-write an article, you’re no longer the person you were.

Doesn’t that sound bizarre?

If you know me even slightly well, you’ve probably heard of my “article graveyard”. Yup, that’s where a lot of my articles go to die. At first, I was pretty hopeless at writing articles, labouring over each one for a day, sometimes two. And if I didn’t manage to finish the article, I figured it would end up in the article writing graveyard.

But why not bring all those great ideas up from the “dead”?

That’s because in every single situation you’ll find it takes a lot more time to re-write or re-fashion an article, than to write a fresh one. The temptation is very strong, of course. I mean there you are, with an article that’s almost four-fifths done.

What could go wrong?

You’ve changed, that’s what’s wrong

The article—even if written a few days ago—was written by an earlier version of you. You were all fired up, and your mindset was completely different. If you’d finished off that article, you’d have been fine. But today, you’re a completely different person stepping into a new river. And if you try to get that old feeling back, you’re more than likely to fail.

So why is failure so rampant in re-writes?

You know this feeling well, don’t you? Let’s say you started on a project. Then you were called away for some reason. Later you decide to go back to where you left off. And it takes ages just to figure out what you’d done, let alone restart the process.

When writing, you’d have to read the article once or twice, just to get back to that original mood.

Of course, that mood has vanished into the great yonder

And what you’re left with is are parts of your article, that you somehow have to reassemble.

And some of us succeed.

We battle our way through the article, and we somehow manage to rewrite it. But get an experienced eye to audit the article, and as good as it looks, you can see the patchwork. That patchwork is the break in the mood—that you simply can’t re-capture.

So are we to let “sleeping articles” lie?

Not necessarily. If you’ve had a good idea and you feel like tackling the topic again, here’s what you should do. Outline the article anew—with renewed vigour (and mood). Then once you’re ready to go, you may find you’re still keen to see what you covered the last time around.

Sometimes you may find you had a great opening. Or maybe you had some very important points that you’ve forgotten since. Well, go ahead, add them to your outline.

While rewriting an article is a pain, reworking an outline isn’t quite as painful

You may still struggle a bit, but an outline is still like a blue-print. You can work it around without too much of a hassle. But if you try to go right back into the original article, you’ll run into a chunk of unwanted trouble.

You’ll be desperately trying to capture something that has passed.

The river has changed.
You’ve changed.
It’s time to move on.


How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines
Learn How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

“This product will help you avoid writing traps as well as anticipating and handling objections when they arise in the reader’s mind”

“I would recommend this product, because it will quickly show you how to develop thoughts and ideas into a structure capturing the important stuff to write about. Not only that, it will help you avoid writing traps as well as anticipating and handling objections when they arise in the reader’s mind.”

Duncan MacIntyre

Office Chair Advice, Derbys UK

Judge for yourself:  How to speed up article writing with simple outlines.


Top Selling Products Under $50


Announcing! Dartboard Pricing: How To Increase Prices (Without Losing Customers)

Website Series: How to create a trusting experience for your website visitor
Testimonial Secrets:
Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy (And Why They Don’t)
Sales Pages:
How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


5000bc: The place to get reliable answers to your complex business problems?
Black Belt Presentation: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
Membership : How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 



Free from Psychotactics: The $2500 Brain Alchemy Marketing Strategy Workshop

itunes_ba_masterclass-copy

In the year 2007, I had a discussion with a client. It was about giving most of our courses away—yes, almost every Psychotactics Course—by the year 2020.

Without charge.

It sounds unusual: Why would someone just give valuable information away?

You and I know that “normal” people don’t do this kind of stuff. No one just gives away thousands of dollars worth of stuff without some sneaky up-sell, cross-sell or some kind of catch. To give away valuable information just like that, sounds weird at the very least.

But we’re not normal (our logo should give you enough hints).

My long-term goal is to create a university in New Zealand (Casa LocoLoco: The Mad House)

This university will be in place to help folks like you run their businesses. It will be a non-profit university. In the spirit of Casa LocoLoco, I am slowly going to make most Psychotactics products and workshops free by the year 2020. So as you can see this process is thoughtful; it’s methodical. And it’s designed on the fact that generosity helps us all.

And the Brain Alchemy Masterclass is just the beginning.

The only ‘catch’ if you want to call it that, is that you have to opt-in. This is for several reasons, but the main reasons are:

1) I only care about people who’ll take the trouble to opt-in.

2) Because it’s a three-day workshop, the digital file download will have to be managed, or if everyone downloads the material at once, it will crash our servers. So I have to send out notifications on different days/time of day.

Of course giving this free is not an easy task, because the whole thing needs project management to see that we don’t crash our server or do crazy things.

Anyway…that’s the the gist of things.

More details will follow next week— so look out for the email (or blog post as the case may be). In next week’s email, you’ll get a direct link (after you fill in a form).

This is just the announcement of what’s to come (yes, like a trailer to a movie :) )

Important Note

This workshop was given away in 2009, 2011, 2013  and we are giving it away again. If you’ve already heard/read it, it’s a good idea to experience it again. The questions remain the same but the answers change and you will experience the same information in a totally different light.

Warm regards,
Sean
P.S. If you already have The Brain Alchemy MasterClass and prefer not to receive follow up emails, go to this link and enter your details.  Opt-Out Form.

 


Announcing: How to Sell Without Selling (Special Offer)


quick presentations

Marketing provides thousands of ways to get and keep customer’s attention…
But you don’t want thousands of ways. You just want a simple system that’s effective. A system that has been tested for over 12 years and  got results. And most importantly a system  that you don’t have to pull up a 675 page manual to even work out.

Announcing: The Brain Audit Kit + Special Goodies worth $158 (Valid until 12 May 2015)

The Brain Audit is the book that gives you a system
The Brain Audit is a step-by-step system that enables you to understand what’s going on in the brain of your customer. It’s a system that is based on a deep understanding of how our mind works, and why we do what do.

When you buy the Premium Brain Audit Kit on the 13th, 14th 15th, and 16th Sept. 2014, you’ll also get “How To Identify The Right Target Audience For Your Business”.

This book will give you an instant understanding on 
-HowYou Can Get Target Audience Wrong
-How Target Profile Works
-Persona Vs Person and more…

Take advantage of this special offer of The Brain Audit Kit right away. (This offer expires on 12 May 2015)

http://www.psychotactics.com/special/brain-audit-offer/

 

Regards,
Sean
P.S.Make sure you don’t miss this offer. And make a decision, based on what you read.

http://www.psychotactics.com/special/brain-audit-offer/

(This offer expires on 12 May, 2015)


My Adventures With Podcasting (In Case You’re Interested)

My Adventures With Podcasting (In Case You're Interested)

Where did you start?

What do you use?
Do you outline?

Slow down. Yes, do slow down.

Podcasting is like everything else. Work, lots of work. But also a lot of fun. So here’s the abbreviated story. You’re welcome to ask more questions because I do have the answers.

So let’s start at the top.

When I started out…

I think I started doing videos before podcasts. And around that time, there was this cool “scrolling software” like they use in television studios. You put in your text (pre-written, of course) and the text would scroll. It’s called a teleprompter. And I loved the software.

For about three days, that is…

After three days it was a pain

For one, I had to write out all the text. And then I had to put it in the software. Then work out how to read it without sounding I was reading. All good training, I suppose, but still a pain. It would have been so much nicer if I could simply speak into the microphone and make sense.

But hey, I do make sense

I talk to people all day long (when I get the chance) and I make perfect sense. No teleprompter, no script. I’m doing just fine. So maybe I’m quite good at this, I think. I just don’t know how good. And so I started out little pieces. Instead of a 15 minute podcast or video, how about a 30 seconds without falling apart?

That worked pretty well

For one I had to remove all the “ah” and “um” and “like”. That’s easy, really. And there’s a method for doing just that. But other than that, I could go from 30 seconds to a minute, to two, to five. Pushing the boundary just a bit and keeping the teleproblematicmachine at bay.

Besides, without that telemonstracity, I could twist and turn, should I need to, in the midst of a sentence. I was no longer a captive to the words on screen.

That was some time ago. And here is my current adventure with podcasting…

1) I outline

I’ve done hundreds of articles. And at least a hundred audio episodes. And if I just rock up and do my thing, it’s going down the gurgler for sure. I can get away with it in an interview, but the moment I realise I can’t ramble, the outline is critical.

Most audio is tedious, because of the ramble. Blah, blah, Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. The sound of their own voice, that’s how people like it, once they’ve gotten use to their voice.

But it doesn’t lend itself to audio. Or video (which is really mostly pictures with audio).

So the outline is pretty much the same as an article for an outline.

Not a lot different, really. A bunch of points, on a Post-It® so small, that the girls at the cafe cringe. Surely I would need a bigger Post-It®, they say. But no, I’m good with the tiny, writing and the outline is done, dusted and ready to roll. Having a Post-It® also helps me stick it nice and close to the microphone where I can see the darned thing when speaking.

2) And knowing your software is critical too

On Garageband, which I use to record, “R” starts the recording. Spacebar pauses it. Even if I go mumbling away, I can stop, go back, and re-record. Having to record more often than less, forces me to know shortcuts. It forces me to explore how to save time, and yet improve quality.

I still take 30 minutes to record a 15 minute podcast. Sometimes on a bad day, it’s 45 minutes. But the bad days and good days depend on the strength of the outline. The more stupid and foolhardy I am, the less I am prone to depend on my Post-It®.

Then, all hell breaks loose and 45 minutes later, I’m feeling the full strength of my stupidity gene coming to the fore.

So yes, I outline. And yes, I learn my software.

3) And yes, I try and record while the idea is super-fresh in my head.

Oh, I didn’t mention that, did I? The idea being fresh in your head is incredibly critical. If you’ve ever been exposed to one of those Big Macs (that last forever), well, that’s not how an outline works.

Once you’re all charged up about a topic, you start to write it down. Get it on the Post-It®. Then, the sooner you can get it in an article, podcast or video, the better.

Your idea is a bit like sushi. Wait for a day and it’s not that good. Wait a week and it’s decomposed rice and super-smelly fish.

4) Which brings me to rehearsing

I don’t rehearse. I don’t suppose I ever have. I like to make mistakes, fix it and go along. In the beginning it was stop, go, stop, stop, stop, go, go, stop, stop, stop. Now it’s more go, go, go, go, and stop every now and then.

Even the super-pros like Ira Glass (who’s been doing radio since who knows when) does a few takes.

And you and I don’t have time for many takes (I don’t suppose Ira has, either). But nonetheless, expect to suffer a bit, because  the suffering builds character. And yes, you do get better. A lot better.

5) Of course, output is dependent on input

If I’m doing podcasts, I need to listen to podcasts. I get ideas of how they’re constructed. I learn to hate what I hate, with a passion (and avoid it on my podcast). And I figure out things I haven’t thought of before. Besides a podcast will seep into you.

Like some insidious drug, you’ll find that you’re “copying” (horrors) their style.

But over time, and if you’re smart, you’ll listen to a lot

Then the styles merge, marry and break up and what you get is an amazingly crazy style of your own. Of course, you don’t fall in love with your style. Push the boundaries—don’t be the Monkees, be like Sting or Paul Simon. Scare yourself. And your style will start to do its own tape mix (you know what that is, right?) and it will evolve.

The ums, the ahs—gone.

The telebombastictrignometer—gone.
The listening to other stuff—both good and bad—in.
The outline—very much in.

Life is good. A bit on the edge as always. But life will be good.
And especially when you learn the short cut for ®.

The link for the “ums” and “ahs” and how to get rid of them is here:
Psychotactics: Removing Ums and Ahs from Speaking

 

Next Step: Don’t miss—The Three Month Vacation Podcast (audio and transcript)

“I’ve known Sean for the better part of a decade. What Sean shares in this podcast is not some pitch from someone who claims “success” but the passion of a fellow human just a little further along on the journey.

Sean truly wants to help you get what you deserve and you deserve to spend a few moments gaining from the insights he shares on these podcasts.”

Bryan Eisenberg
Best Selling Author—Call To Action
USA

Here are the links
On iTunes
On Android
From the website

 


Links To Visit

website-strategy_small
How do you design a solid home page that helps customers find their way around, and do what you want them to do? Find out more…


Top Selling Products Under $50


Announcing! Dartboard Pricing: How To Increase Prices (Without Losing Customers)

Website Series: How to create a trusting experience for your website visitor
Testimonial Secrets:
Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy (And Why They Don’t)
Sales Pages:
How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


5000bc: The place to get reliable answers to your complex business problems?
Black Belt Presentation: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
Membership : How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 



How to get FREE: Two Brain Audit Audio Files

Higher Prices
Last week you got a chunky 30-page excerpt of The Brain Audit.
This week you can get two short five-minute audio files. These short audios will teach you two very important lessons which you can implement straight away.


What you will learn:

1) The critical difference between ‘The Solution’ and ‘Your
Solution’
2)  A tested-formula on how to write a powerful tag-line.


There is a deadline though

You have to get it before May 13, 2015. Then it’s gone. So get it right away. Either download it, or listen online.


Here are the links: (It make take a few minutes to load)

Each audio is 5 minutes and contains clear and actionable information. So listen to it today and implement what you  learn.

http://psychotactics.com/Brain_Audit_TaglineFormula.mp3

http://psychotactics.com/Brain_Audit_SolutionVsYourSolution.mp3
Try it today. You’ll hear for yourself what makes The Brain Audit so well-loved and mostly well-used!
Sean
P.S. Don’t forget to download the audio before 13 May, 2015.


The Man In The Jungle Method

The Man In The Jungle Method

Imagine it’s a hot day and you’re longing for some ice-cream

I give it you.
You’re about to lick it.
But then it gets snatched away from you.

You don’t need to be told what happens next, right?

And that’s because your brain has already gotten the “reward”. Hundreds of milliseconds before you even licked that ice-cream, the pleasure centre of your brain lit up in anticipation of how the ice-cream would taste.

When the cone was snatched away, there was an interrupt that can only be fixed one way. Unless and until you get the ice-cream back, the situation remains unresolved.

This method is called “The Man In the jungle” method

In his book, “Pitch Anything”, the author Oren Klaff describes how to create attention by leaving a situation unresolved (In the Article Writing Course, we call this the “disconnector). And it’s important because you never know when the audience is going to fall asleep.

At some point, the audience will snooze

But is it bad luck or bad planning that you have people nodding off? People don’t nod off when you know how to get their attention—and get it at the right moment. Just as you’re about to give the juiciest part of your presentation, everyone in the room needs to be super-alert. That’s when you employ “The man in the jungle” technique.

“The Man In the jungle” method consists of three parts

Part 1: Put the man in the jungle.
Part 2: Set beasts upon him.
Part 3: Get him to the “edge” of the jungle—but not out of it.

So let’s analyse what these three parts mean, shall we?

Let’s start with the “man in the jungle”

When you put the main in the jungle,  you are using a metaphor for someone getting into trouble. In our businesses we all get into some sort of trouble. So let’s say you’re sitting at your computer, and you get a client telling you that your website seems to be acting weird. You’re concerned, but not overly concerned.

This is the starting point. You’ve started to unroll the story, with a dollop of trouble, but no apparent danger.

But in the next part, you realise that “beasts are upon you”

This second part unravels the story. And not in a good way. Let’s go back to your website. You head there, expecting to find nothing too dramatic. But there it is. It’s been defaced. Hackers have been on your website and mutilated it.

That’s only part of the trouble. Suddenly you’re getting a flood of e-mails from clients. And they’re all saying that red flags are showing up on all the search engines. You gulp, and you take a deep dive into checking things out.

It’s worse than you thought

Not only are some of the search engines bringing up warnings, but they’re preventing clients from visiting your website. Suddenly you’re facing the prospect of having to clean up your website, get removed from the black list and let your clients know that it’s safe to visit the site. In short, you’re not only in the jungle, but being attacked by beasts.

And then you find someone who’s going to help

After hours of scouring the internet to find a reliable source (it is your business, after all), you manage to get a recommendation. You’ve actually found someone who can clean up your site and get things back to normal again.

There’s just one problem: This clean-up expert has sent you a big list of things that you need to comply with, because if you don’t comply with the list, the hackers will be back and cause havoc yet again.

In case you didn’t notice—we moved the third part

You weren’t suppose to notice. You were supposed to get riveted to the story—which is likely what happened. But even as we moved through the article, we followed a pattern of getting into the jungle, being attacked by beasts and being taken out of the jungle.

Taken out? Not really. You’re still at the edge. There’s no resolution in sight. You still need to finish quite a few things before the problem even starts to get resolved.

An unfinished problem gets the audience on the edge of its seat

The audience has been pulled through the three stages of the story. And then they’re looking for resolution. And it doesn’t happen. Instead you move along with the rest of the story. And this lack of closure acts like a burr in the shoe. It forces you to pay attention. It doesn’t let you get distracted, because your brain wants to know the answer.

But why is this burr so critical?

It’s critical because of how an audience reacts in a presentation. Once a certain amount of time has passed, the audience gets restless. No matter how good your presentation, they start to think of objections, of things they want to do, or start analysing the facts coldly.

When you slide in the burr, they are forced to pay attention. They’re expecting you to tell them what happened next.

So won’t they get distracted if you don’t tell them what happens next?

No, they won’t. You still don’t know if the website was fixed and the hacking resolved. You don’t know the details of how the things that needed to be complied with, were finally completed. The story never ended. It just broke off at the “edge of the jungle”

But you didn’t get distracted. You continued reading, expecting somehow that the details would get resolved.

The “man in the jungle” story is only a way to keep the attention going

Once you’ve finished with the information, you can easily bring back the closure to the story. By which point, it’s almost a formality. The audience is likely to suspect there’s a happy ending. And there usually is.

But you’ve made your point

You put the man in the jungle.
You put beasts on him.
You then took him to the edge.
You then put in the critical information now that the audience is on edge.
Finally, it’s time to close the “man in jungle” story.

Attention getting is not an art. It’s a science.

And in a world of distraction it’s easy for audiences to fall asleep at the most important part of the presentation. To keep them awake, you need to tell a story—a “man in the jungle” story.

It’s like taking away their ice-cream before they’re about to lick it.
Once you’ve said your piece, you can give the ice-cream back.

Makes sense, eh?

P.S. That story about the hacker attack—that was our reality in 2014. Our website wasn’t defaced, but because we’re listed in the top 100,000 sites in the world (according to Alexa), we were repeatedly targeted. And we got the website fixed and secured.

We also got entire websites re-created (and yes we have some great sources, thanks to this ugly situation that we got put into, quite by chance).  If you need details, e-mail us at sean@psychotactics.com.


website-strategy_small
How do you design a solid home page that helps customers find their way around, and do what you want them to do? Find out more…


Top Selling Products Under $50


Announcing! Dartboard Pricing: How To Increase Prices (Without Losing Customers)

Website Series: How to create a trusting experience for your website visitor
Testimonial Secrets:
Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy (And Why They Don’t)
Sales Pages:
How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


5000bc: The place to get reliable answers to your complex business problems?
Black Belt Presentation: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
Membership : How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website