$2500 Free Workshop: How To (Finally) Get On The List

Web_Cover

Last week we announced about the $2500 Brain Alchemy Masterclass Workshop
we were giving away. And you were promised that you’d get a follow up email.

Well, tah…dah…here’s the follow up email.

And the link to read more details and get on the list is at:
http://www.psychotactics.com/free/brain-alchemy-goodies/

 

 

 

Have fun :)
Warm regards,

Sean
P.S. It’s free. But only for the next seven weeks. And there is a waiting list.


Why Rewriting Is A Mistake

Why Rewriting Is A Mistake

There is an ancient saying that goes like this…

You can’t step into the same river twice.
That’s because the river has changed.
And you’ve changed.

And similarly when you try to re-write an article, you’re no longer the person you were.

Doesn’t that sound bizarre?

If you know me even slightly well, you’ve probably heard of my “article graveyard”. Yup, that’s where a lot of my articles go to die. At first, I was pretty hopeless at writing articles, labouring over each one for a day, sometimes two. And if I didn’t manage to finish the article, I figured it would end up in the article writing graveyard.

But why not bring all those great ideas up from the “dead”?

That’s because in every single situation you’ll find it takes a lot more time to re-write or re-fashion an article, than to write a fresh one. The temptation is very strong, of course. I mean there you are, with an article that’s almost four-fifths done.

What could go wrong?

You’ve changed, that’s what’s wrong

The article—even if written a few days ago—was written by an earlier version of you. You were all fired up, and your mindset was completely different. If you’d finished off that article, you’d have been fine. But today, you’re a completely different person stepping into a new river. And if you try to get that old feeling back, you’re more than likely to fail.

So why is failure so rampant in re-writes?

You know this feeling well, don’t you? Let’s say you started on a project. Then you were called away for some reason. Later you decide to go back to where you left off. And it takes ages just to figure out what you’d done, let alone restart the process.

When writing, you’d have to read the article once or twice, just to get back to that original mood.

Of course, that mood has vanished into the great yonder

And what you’re left with is are parts of your article, that you somehow have to reassemble.

And some of us succeed.

We battle our way through the article, and we somehow manage to rewrite it. But get an experienced eye to audit the article, and as good as it looks, you can see the patchwork. That patchwork is the break in the mood—that you simply can’t re-capture.

So are we to let “sleeping articles” lie?

Not necessarily. If you’ve had a good idea and you feel like tackling the topic again, here’s what you should do. Outline the article anew—with renewed vigour (and mood). Then once you’re ready to go, you may find you’re still keen to see what you covered the last time around.

Sometimes you may find you had a great opening. Or maybe you had some very important points that you’ve forgotten since. Well, go ahead, add them to your outline.

While rewriting an article is a pain, reworking an outline isn’t quite as painful

You may still struggle a bit, but an outline is still like a blue-print. You can work it around without too much of a hassle. But if you try to go right back into the original article, you’ll run into a chunk of unwanted trouble.

You’ll be desperately trying to capture something that has passed.

The river has changed.
You’ve changed.
It’s time to move on.


How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines
Learn How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

“This product will help you avoid writing traps as well as anticipating and handling objections when they arise in the reader’s mind”

“I would recommend this product, because it will quickly show you how to develop thoughts and ideas into a structure capturing the important stuff to write about. Not only that, it will help you avoid writing traps as well as anticipating and handling objections when they arise in the reader’s mind.”

Duncan MacIntyre

Office Chair Advice, Derbys UK

Judge for yourself:  How to speed up article writing with simple outlines.


Top Selling Products Under $50


Announcing! Dartboard Pricing: How To Increase Prices (Without Losing Customers)

Website Series: How to create a trusting experience for your website visitor
Testimonial Secrets:
Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy (And Why They Don’t)
Sales Pages:
How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


5000bc: The place to get reliable answers to your complex business problems?
Black Belt Presentation: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
Membership : How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 



Free from Psychotactics: The $2500 Brain Alchemy Marketing Strategy Workshop

itunes_ba_masterclass-copy

In the year 2007, I had a discussion with a client. It was about giving most of our courses away—yes, almost every Psychotactics Course—by the year 2020.

Without charge.

It sounds unusual: Why would someone just give valuable information away?

You and I know that “normal” people don’t do this kind of stuff. No one just gives away thousands of dollars worth of stuff without some sneaky up-sell, cross-sell or some kind of catch. To give away valuable information just like that, sounds weird at the very least.

But we’re not normal (our logo should give you enough hints).

My long-term goal is to create a university in New Zealand (Casa LocoLoco: The Mad House)

This university will be in place to help folks like you run their businesses. It will be a non-profit university. In the spirit of Casa LocoLoco, I am slowly going to make most Psychotactics products and workshops free by the year 2020. So as you can see this process is thoughtful; it’s methodical. And it’s designed on the fact that generosity helps us all.

And the Brain Alchemy Masterclass is just the beginning.

The only ‘catch’ if you want to call it that, is that you have to opt-in. This is for several reasons, but the main reasons are:

1) I only care about people who’ll take the trouble to opt-in.

2) Because it’s a three-day workshop, the digital file download will have to be managed, or if everyone downloads the material at once, it will crash our servers. So I have to send out notifications on different days/time of day.

Of course giving this free is not an easy task, because the whole thing needs project management to see that we don’t crash our server or do crazy things.

Anyway…that’s the the gist of things.

More details will follow next week— so look out for the email (or blog post as the case may be). In next week’s email, you’ll get a direct link (after you fill in a form).

This is just the announcement of what’s to come (yes, like a trailer to a movie :) )

Important Note

This workshop was given away in 2009, 2011, 2013  and we are giving it away again. If you’ve already heard/read it, it’s a good idea to experience it again. The questions remain the same but the answers change and you will experience the same information in a totally different light.

Warm regards,
Sean
P.S. If you already have The Brain Alchemy MasterClass and prefer not to receive follow up emails, go to this link and enter your details.  Opt-Out Form.

 


Announcing: How to Sell Without Selling (Special Offer)


quick presentations

Marketing provides thousands of ways to get and keep customer’s attention…
But you don’t want thousands of ways. You just want a simple system that’s effective. A system that has been tested for over 12 years and  got results. And most importantly a system  that you don’t have to pull up a 675 page manual to even work out.

Announcing: The Brain Audit Kit + Special Goodies worth $158 (Valid until 12 May 2015)

The Brain Audit is the book that gives you a system
The Brain Audit is a step-by-step system that enables you to understand what’s going on in the brain of your customer. It’s a system that is based on a deep understanding of how our mind works, and why we do what do.

When you buy the Premium Brain Audit Kit on the 13th, 14th 15th, and 16th Sept. 2014, you’ll also get “How To Identify The Right Target Audience For Your Business”.

This book will give you an instant understanding on 
-HowYou Can Get Target Audience Wrong
-How Target Profile Works
-Persona Vs Person and more…

Take advantage of this special offer of The Brain Audit Kit right away. (This offer expires on 12 May 2015)

http://www.psychotactics.com/special/brain-audit-offer/

 

Regards,
Sean
P.S.Make sure you don’t miss this offer. And make a decision, based on what you read.

http://www.psychotactics.com/special/brain-audit-offer/

(This offer expires on 12 May, 2015)


My Adventures With Podcasting (In Case You’re Interested)

My Adventures With Podcasting (In Case You're Interested)

Where did you start?

What do you use?
Do you outline?

Slow down. Yes, do slow down.

Podcasting is like everything else. Work, lots of work. But also a lot of fun. So here’s the abbreviated story. You’re welcome to ask more questions because I do have the answers.

So let’s start at the top.

When I started out…

I think I started doing videos before podcasts. And around that time, there was this cool “scrolling software” like they use in television studios. You put in your text (pre-written, of course) and the text would scroll. It’s called a teleprompter. And I loved the software.

For about three days, that is…

After three days it was a pain

For one, I had to write out all the text. And then I had to put it in the software. Then work out how to read it without sounding I was reading. All good training, I suppose, but still a pain. It would have been so much nicer if I could simply speak into the microphone and make sense.

But hey, I do make sense

I talk to people all day long (when I get the chance) and I make perfect sense. No teleprompter, no script. I’m doing just fine. So maybe I’m quite good at this, I think. I just don’t know how good. And so I started out little pieces. Instead of a 15 minute podcast or video, how about a 30 seconds without falling apart?

That worked pretty well

For one I had to remove all the “ah” and “um” and “like”. That’s easy, really. And there’s a method for doing just that. But other than that, I could go from 30 seconds to a minute, to two, to five. Pushing the boundary just a bit and keeping the teleproblematicmachine at bay.

Besides, without that telemonstracity, I could twist and turn, should I need to, in the midst of a sentence. I was no longer a captive to the words on screen.

That was some time ago. And here is my current adventure with podcasting…

1) I outline

I’ve done hundreds of articles. And at least a hundred audio episodes. And if I just rock up and do my thing, it’s going down the gurgler for sure. I can get away with it in an interview, but the moment I realise I can’t ramble, the outline is critical.

Most audio is tedious, because of the ramble. Blah, blah, Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and more blahdee blah, blahdoo, blah, blah, blah. The sound of their own voice, that’s how people like it, once they’ve gotten use to their voice.

But it doesn’t lend itself to audio. Or video (which is really mostly pictures with audio).

So the outline is pretty much the same as an article for an outline.

Not a lot different, really. A bunch of points, on a Post-It® so small, that the girls at the cafe cringe. Surely I would need a bigger Post-It®, they say. But no, I’m good with the tiny, writing and the outline is done, dusted and ready to roll. Having a Post-It® also helps me stick it nice and close to the microphone where I can see the darned thing when speaking.

2) And knowing your software is critical too

On Garageband, which I use to record, “R” starts the recording. Spacebar pauses it. Even if I go mumbling away, I can stop, go back, and re-record. Having to record more often than less, forces me to know shortcuts. It forces me to explore how to save time, and yet improve quality.

I still take 30 minutes to record a 15 minute podcast. Sometimes on a bad day, it’s 45 minutes. But the bad days and good days depend on the strength of the outline. The more stupid and foolhardy I am, the less I am prone to depend on my Post-It®.

Then, all hell breaks loose and 45 minutes later, I’m feeling the full strength of my stupidity gene coming to the fore.

So yes, I outline. And yes, I learn my software.

3) And yes, I try and record while the idea is super-fresh in my head.

Oh, I didn’t mention that, did I? The idea being fresh in your head is incredibly critical. If you’ve ever been exposed to one of those Big Macs (that last forever), well, that’s not how an outline works.

Once you’re all charged up about a topic, you start to write it down. Get it on the Post-It®. Then, the sooner you can get it in an article, podcast or video, the better.

Your idea is a bit like sushi. Wait for a day and it’s not that good. Wait a week and it’s decomposed rice and super-smelly fish.

4) Which brings me to rehearsing

I don’t rehearse. I don’t suppose I ever have. I like to make mistakes, fix it and go along. In the beginning it was stop, go, stop, stop, stop, go, go, stop, stop, stop. Now it’s more go, go, go, go, and stop every now and then.

Even the super-pros like Ira Glass (who’s been doing radio since who knows when) does a few takes.

And you and I don’t have time for many takes (I don’t suppose Ira has, either). But nonetheless, expect to suffer a bit, because  the suffering builds character. And yes, you do get better. A lot better.

5) Of course, output is dependent on input

If I’m doing podcasts, I need to listen to podcasts. I get ideas of how they’re constructed. I learn to hate what I hate, with a passion (and avoid it on my podcast). And I figure out things I haven’t thought of before. Besides a podcast will seep into you.

Like some insidious drug, you’ll find that you’re “copying” (horrors) their style.

But over time, and if you’re smart, you’ll listen to a lot

Then the styles merge, marry and break up and what you get is an amazingly crazy style of your own. Of course, you don’t fall in love with your style. Push the boundaries—don’t be the Monkees, be like Sting or Paul Simon. Scare yourself. And your style will start to do its own tape mix (you know what that is, right?) and it will evolve.

The ums, the ahs—gone.

The telebombastictrignometer—gone.
The listening to other stuff—both good and bad—in.
The outline—very much in.

Life is good. A bit on the edge as always. But life will be good.
And especially when you learn the short cut for ®.

The link for the “ums” and “ahs” and how to get rid of them is here:
Psychotactics: Removing Ums and Ahs from Speaking

 

Next Step: Don’t miss—The Three Month Vacation Podcast (audio and transcript)

“I’ve known Sean for the better part of a decade. What Sean shares in this podcast is not some pitch from someone who claims “success” but the passion of a fellow human just a little further along on the journey.

Sean truly wants to help you get what you deserve and you deserve to spend a few moments gaining from the insights he shares on these podcasts.”

Bryan Eisenberg
Best Selling Author—Call To Action
USA

Here are the links
On iTunes
On Android
From the website

 


Links To Visit

website-strategy_small
How do you design a solid home page that helps customers find their way around, and do what you want them to do? Find out more…


Top Selling Products Under $50


Announcing! Dartboard Pricing: How To Increase Prices (Without Losing Customers)

Website Series: How to create a trusting experience for your website visitor
Testimonial Secrets:
Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy (And Why They Don’t)
Sales Pages:
How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


5000bc: The place to get reliable answers to your complex business problems?
Black Belt Presentation: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
Membership : How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 



How to get FREE: Two Brain Audit Audio Files

Higher Prices
Last week you got a chunky 30-page excerpt of The Brain Audit.
This week you can get two short five-minute audio files. These short audios will teach you two very important lessons which you can implement straight away.


What you will learn:

1) The critical difference between ‘The Solution’ and ‘Your
Solution’
2)  A tested-formula on how to write a powerful tag-line.


There is a deadline though

You have to get it before May 13, 2015. Then it’s gone. So get it right away. Either download it, or listen online.


Here are the links: (It make take a few minutes to load)

Each audio is 5 minutes and contains clear and actionable information. So listen to it today and implement what you  learn.

http://psychotactics.com/Brain_Audit_TaglineFormula.mp3

http://psychotactics.com/Brain_Audit_SolutionVsYourSolution.mp3
Try it today. You’ll hear for yourself what makes The Brain Audit so well-loved and mostly well-used!
Sean
P.S. Don’t forget to download the audio before 13 May, 2015.


The Man In The Jungle Method

The Man In The Jungle Method

Imagine it’s a hot day and you’re longing for some ice-cream

I give it you.
You’re about to lick it.
But then it gets snatched away from you.

You don’t need to be told what happens next, right?

And that’s because your brain has already gotten the “reward”. Hundreds of milliseconds before you even licked that ice-cream, the pleasure centre of your brain lit up in anticipation of how the ice-cream would taste.

When the cone was snatched away, there was an interrupt that can only be fixed one way. Unless and until you get the ice-cream back, the situation remains unresolved.

This method is called “The Man In the jungle” method

In his book, “Pitch Anything”, the author Oren Klaff describes how to create attention by leaving a situation unresolved (In the Article Writing Course, we call this the “disconnector). And it’s important because you never know when the audience is going to fall asleep.

At some point, the audience will snooze

But is it bad luck or bad planning that you have people nodding off? People don’t nod off when you know how to get their attention—and get it at the right moment. Just as you’re about to give the juiciest part of your presentation, everyone in the room needs to be super-alert. That’s when you employ “The man in the jungle” technique.

“The Man In the jungle” method consists of three parts

Part 1: Put the man in the jungle.
Part 2: Set beasts upon him.
Part 3: Get him to the “edge” of the jungle—but not out of it.

So let’s analyse what these three parts mean, shall we?

Let’s start with the “man in the jungle”

When you put the main in the jungle,  you are using a metaphor for someone getting into trouble. In our businesses we all get into some sort of trouble. So let’s say you’re sitting at your computer, and you get a client telling you that your website seems to be acting weird. You’re concerned, but not overly concerned.

This is the starting point. You’ve started to unroll the story, with a dollop of trouble, but no apparent danger.

But in the next part, you realise that “beasts are upon you”

This second part unravels the story. And not in a good way. Let’s go back to your website. You head there, expecting to find nothing too dramatic. But there it is. It’s been defaced. Hackers have been on your website and mutilated it.

That’s only part of the trouble. Suddenly you’re getting a flood of e-mails from clients. And they’re all saying that red flags are showing up on all the search engines. You gulp, and you take a deep dive into checking things out.

It’s worse than you thought

Not only are some of the search engines bringing up warnings, but they’re preventing clients from visiting your website. Suddenly you’re facing the prospect of having to clean up your website, get removed from the black list and let your clients know that it’s safe to visit the site. In short, you’re not only in the jungle, but being attacked by beasts.

And then you find someone who’s going to help

After hours of scouring the internet to find a reliable source (it is your business, after all), you manage to get a recommendation. You’ve actually found someone who can clean up your site and get things back to normal again.

There’s just one problem: This clean-up expert has sent you a big list of things that you need to comply with, because if you don’t comply with the list, the hackers will be back and cause havoc yet again.

In case you didn’t notice—we moved the third part

You weren’t suppose to notice. You were supposed to get riveted to the story—which is likely what happened. But even as we moved through the article, we followed a pattern of getting into the jungle, being attacked by beasts and being taken out of the jungle.

Taken out? Not really. You’re still at the edge. There’s no resolution in sight. You still need to finish quite a few things before the problem even starts to get resolved.

An unfinished problem gets the audience on the edge of its seat

The audience has been pulled through the three stages of the story. And then they’re looking for resolution. And it doesn’t happen. Instead you move along with the rest of the story. And this lack of closure acts like a burr in the shoe. It forces you to pay attention. It doesn’t let you get distracted, because your brain wants to know the answer.

But why is this burr so critical?

It’s critical because of how an audience reacts in a presentation. Once a certain amount of time has passed, the audience gets restless. No matter how good your presentation, they start to think of objections, of things they want to do, or start analysing the facts coldly.

When you slide in the burr, they are forced to pay attention. They’re expecting you to tell them what happened next.

So won’t they get distracted if you don’t tell them what happens next?

No, they won’t. You still don’t know if the website was fixed and the hacking resolved. You don’t know the details of how the things that needed to be complied with, were finally completed. The story never ended. It just broke off at the “edge of the jungle”

But you didn’t get distracted. You continued reading, expecting somehow that the details would get resolved.

The “man in the jungle” story is only a way to keep the attention going

Once you’ve finished with the information, you can easily bring back the closure to the story. By which point, it’s almost a formality. The audience is likely to suspect there’s a happy ending. And there usually is.

But you’ve made your point

You put the man in the jungle.
You put beasts on him.
You then took him to the edge.
You then put in the critical information now that the audience is on edge.
Finally, it’s time to close the “man in jungle” story.

Attention getting is not an art. It’s a science.

And in a world of distraction it’s easy for audiences to fall asleep at the most important part of the presentation. To keep them awake, you need to tell a story—a “man in the jungle” story.

It’s like taking away their ice-cream before they’re about to lick it.
Once you’ve said your piece, you can give the ice-cream back.

Makes sense, eh?

P.S. That story about the hacker attack—that was our reality in 2014. Our website wasn’t defaced, but because we’re listed in the top 100,000 sites in the world (according to Alexa), we were repeatedly targeted. And we got the website fixed and secured.

We also got entire websites re-created (and yes we have some great sources, thanks to this ugly situation that we got put into, quite by chance).  If you need details, e-mail us at sean@psychotactics.com.


website-strategy_small
How do you design a solid home page that helps customers find their way around, and do what you want them to do? Find out more…


Top Selling Products Under $50


Announcing! Dartboard Pricing: How To Increase Prices (Without Losing Customers)

Website Series: How to create a trusting experience for your website visitor
Testimonial Secrets:
Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy (And Why They Don’t)
Sales Pages:
How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


5000bc: The place to get reliable answers to your complex business problems?
Black Belt Presentation: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
Membership : How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 



How to get a FREE 30-Page Excerpt of The Brain Audit (Without Even Needing To Fill A Form)

brainaudit_cartoon

If you’ve always wondered what The Brain Audit was all about.
Or if you’ve ever wondered what’s in this book that’s caused thousands of businesses to  ‘sell without selling‘, then here’s away to stop wondering.

Because you can get a chunky 30 page excerpt of The Brain Audit.
And it’s free. You’ll enjoy the cartoons. You’ll enjoy the way The Brain Audit holds your attention. And you’ll learn a lot–even in just 30 pages.

No catches. Not even a darned form to fill.
But let me not yada, yada. Here you go.
Free! The Brain Audit Excerpt.

Warm regards from Auckland
Sean


Can Walking Make You Smarter?

Can Walking Make You Smarter?
You know how folks are always talking about being a millionaire?

Well, there’s a guaranteed way to become a millionaire

It’s called walking. You have those two feet, and if you did 15,000 steps a day, you’d end up doing 5,475,000 steps a year (yes, that is indeed five million, four hundred and seventy five thousand).

But you know what? 15,000 steps a day is an awful number of steps to complete day in and day out.

Yet, let’s suppose you did just half that, averaging about 8,200 steps a day…

You’d still end up doing over 3 million steps a year. Or rather, if we don’t do that many a day, think of 3 million steps that you’re NOT doing. That’s 3 million this year, and 3 million next year, 3 million the year after that.

I have a friend, Chris

Chris used to pride himself on not exercising. He’d go to the extremes most of us wouldn’t—just to avoid exercise.

Crazy things like driving his car across the street. And today Chris has had two heart attacks, he also has diabetes and it’s so bad, he doesn’t have any feeling on the soles of his feet.

But forget about Chris for a while…

I had issues with my health too. We eat out a lot (yes, despite all that food you see me cooking all the time). And the doctor told me that my blood sugar was high; so was my cholesterol and yes I needed to make dietary changes.

Well, I didn’t. I continued to do exactly what I was doing earlier—and I went for a walk. I got myself a Fitbit (www.fitbit.com) and I became a “competitive” walker. I’d park far away from the store.

I’d be the errand boy around the house. Suddenly I was doing what my grandparents; my parents did.

My grandparents and parents saw a gym as a place where you went to become a muscle man

They ate what they liked, drank a lot and yes, they even smoked a lot. But they also walked. And walked. And walked. And that’s the silly kind of journey I’m on.

I started out in July 2012. But this year I decided to have a pre-ordained goal. I decided to walk 15,000 steps a day.

Done well, that would get me to 5,475,000 steps in a year. As you can tell, that’s a heck of a lot of walking.


That’s just January. As you can see, some days I get “sloppy”. But my goal is clear. I’m going to make it to 5 million steps this year. Without a goal, you get nowhere.

But it’s also a heck of a lot of learning

I listen to courses, podcasts and audio books on my way out. And I learn a language on my way back (right now it’s Italian, which by the way, is remarkably like Spanish and Portuguese).

I don’t try to remember all the stuff I’m hearing. I just treat the audio in my ear, like radio. I remember whatever I can, even it’s a measly bit. And bit by bit, I learn a lot.

Like everyone else on the planet, I have no time. So I make time by walking. My iPhone is always strapped to my side. It’s always loaded and ready to go.

If I’ve judged right, I’ll finish over 500 hours of learning just this year

When you consider that a two day workshop usually has just a little over 12 hours of content, that’s like doing 450, 2-day workshops in a single year. Mind-boggling, isn’t it?

The opposite of exercise, isn’t weight gain.
The opposite is decay.
Decay of the body.
Decay of the mind.

I’m on Fitbit. You can get “competitive” too. Join me and get those legs moving.

Let’s go. Let’s get rid of the body and mind decay.
Let’s all become “millionaires”.

P.S. I detest exercise. I like playing a game like badminton, for example. But exercise bores me. Still, decay is not an option.

P.P.S. Wondering what happened to the medical reports? Well, the doctor said I was doing great. But I hadn’t changed my diet at all. I just exercised. I’m not suggesting you do the same. Do whatever it takes to lose weight and gain brain power. And yes, start walking—AND—counting!


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How do you design a solid home page that helps customers find their way around, and do what you want them to do? Find out more…

 

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Live US Workshop 2015:  2 Seats Left!
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Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy (And Why They Don’t)
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How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


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3 Guaranteed Ways To Get Writer’s Block

3 Guaranteed Ways To Get Writer's Block

 

Three factors cause writer’s block.

Underwork.
Overwork.
Lack of systematic planning.

But let’s talk about systematic planning, first

Let’s talk about boiling an egg, shall we? What would you do first? Just turn on the flame and then scramble to get the vessel, water and egg? Wouldn’t the flame be the very last thing you turn on when doing something as simple as boiling an egg? Yet, there we go into writer-land, sitting at our computer, and expecting the ingredients to show up from thin air!

And that’s where the system goes out of the window.
So what would a real system look like?

A real system would involve at least three steps.

Step 1: Generate ONE topic.
Step 2: Generate ONE sub-topic
Step 3: Get to ONE sub-sub-topic

Let’s start with Step 1 and generate ONE topic

When you sit down, you first need to have a topic. Most people confuse a topic with a headline. And a topic isn’t a headline at all. It’s a topic. e.g. Japan is a topic. It’s the broad, big picture kind of thingy that you can’t do anything with at all. The purpose of the topic is simply to give you direction—so you can head over to Step 2—the sub-topic, which is where at least part of the action begins.

So why does the sub-topic have so much relevance?

That’s easy to understand, isn’t it? The topic like “Japan” is too hard to handle. So you chop it down to some thing more manageable—like “the bullet train”. Now you have a much better point of focus. Your mind is off the geishas, tonkatsu and green tea ice-cream. Instead you’re focused on just the sub-topic of the “bullet train”.

And sometimes, that’s as far as you need to go—from topic to sub-topic.
Obviously this isn’t one of those happy days, so we delve deeper into Step 3 and sub-sub-topics.

The sub-sub-topic usually nails the deal

Your brain is focused on the “bullet train” and now you can write a pretty detailed account of the bullet train. Maybe you could take us on a journey that includes the history, the technology and the challenges encountered.

And as you’re writing, something weird happens

You suddenly find that the article is getting very bloated. You started to write about two-three paragraphs about the “challenges encountered”, but suddenly you seem to have dozens of points on “challenges”.

Well, don’t panic. We’re still on track (pardon the pun). You continue to put what you can in a couple of paragraphs and silently rejoice. You’ve now created not one, but two articles on the “bullet train”.

Aha, but no article has been written, right?

Not yet. You’ve spent all this time buzzing steadily ahead from topic to sub-topic. And then delving down to sub-sub-topics. And now you know exactly what you’re going to write about. You’ve let your thoughts simmer and not a word of the article has been written. Yet, putting together these elements is akin to get the egg, the water and vessel together. At this point, a simple outline will get the cooking process underway—and you can write.

So yes, systematic planning helps keep writer’s block away. But what about the other two issues? How do under work and over work play their part?

Underwork is when you decide to do nothing

Any skill requires you to get to a level of fluency. And to get to fluency, you have to write every day—at least for a while. But often we write a bit, then take a break. That day long break stretches to a week, maybe two weeks, and then hell freezes over. It takes an enormous amount of persistence to get moving. Yup, writer’s block has smacked you right in the face!

But overwork will do about the same

Most of us have forgotten how to take time off. So we keep working endlessly. And all this crazy work, work, work soon depletes our energy. Energy is a strange thing because you can have time but no energy. With no energy we slip right into resistance, procrastination and yup, hell freezes over a second time.

Luckily there is a way out of the trap

No matter how much of a soup you’re in, all you really have to do is go through the three-step process. Start simple. Just a topic. Add your sub-topic. Then, the sub-sub-topic. Now your brain is churning steadily ahead.

Writer’s Block has been defeated.

For today, at least.


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2) Live US Workshop 2015: 3 Seats Left!
How to create knockout information products that instantly separate you from the competition (and enable you to charge higher prices)


Top Selling Products Under $50


Announcing! Dartboard Pricing: How To Increase Prices (Without Losing Customers)

Website Series: How to create a trusting experience for your website visitor
Testimonial Secrets:
Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy (And Why They Don’t)
Sales Pages:
How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


5000bc: The place to get reliable answers to your complex business problems?
Black Belt Presentation: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
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Why We Struggle To Write a Book: 3 Structural Reasons

Why We Struggle To Write a Book: 3 Structural Reasons

When you sit down to write a book, you wonder why the sound of hitting your head is so very loud.

The more you sit down, the harder it seems.
And yet, there’s a reason—three actually.

And the three are—tah dah!

1) Structure
2) Design
3) Content

Stage 1: Structure is where you design the “design”

Most of us have, at some point, played with Lego. When you attack a kid’s Lego set, you don’t need a plan. Bricks go over bricks, red over blue, green under yellow—and you get applause at the end of the day. Which is fair enough. You’re a kid playing and play should be free-wheeling.

But the moment you get to serious house-building and you pull out your Lego resumé, you’ve got trouble on your hands. And that’s because you need a blue print of sorts. You need a construction plan. Just sitting down and attacking the timber ain’t going to get that house up in a hurry.

Which is approximately how you write a book as well

Most of us have read books—sure, but haven’t been privy to the writing process. And the first part of the process is planning.

You need a framework to hang your information on. And the framework makes things accessible, and idiot-proof. The biggest reason we have DIY (do-it-yourself) disasters, is because someone with a hammer and blowtorch decides to write a book.

Invariably you get a book, but the core of it is shoddy. The material is extremely hard to consume.

But we’re not even jumping over to the reader

Like DIY without a blueprint, it’s just plain hard work.

The reason why so many tasks take so much time is because a plan makes the step-by-step process easier. You know where you’re going right—and more importantly where you’re going off on a tangent. And when we take this tangential trip, we end up spending a lot of time.

Time that could have saved, with a plan; a structure in place.

When you look back at the Renaissance, for instance, you see an incredible volume of creativity

Why were so many people creative at one point in time? The answer lay in the structure of apprenticeship.

The teacher had a plan, the apprentice followed the plan. And then once they were fluent, they went on to create their own marvellous pieces of art. Writing too, is a piece of art. And sure you can throw anything together and hope it sticks. But it’s better to have structure.

However, structure itself won’t work—and this takes us to design.

Stage 2: What’s design?

Design is indeed what it looks like, but it’s more about how it’s consumed. So when you read a book like The Brain Audit, for example, you find yourself sliding through it.

Now on the face of it, it’s a marketing book with some analogy about seven red bags on a conveyor belt. Doesn’t sound too racy, does it? And yet, the moment you start, it’s a slippery slide.

Chapter after chapter gets your attention…

You hardly feel like you’re reading a marketing book. You somehow feel motivated to keep going. And this is because of the design.

It’s designed to look good—yes it is—but it’s also designed to get you slip-sliding.

Do you notice the white spaces? The sub-head design? The cartoons, the summaries, the captions, the stories and analogies—they’re all designed to do a specific thing at a specific time.

Just like when you’re building a house, you get different elements working sequentially, but also all at once

You get the piles put in, then the house structure. Suddenly there’s an army of plumbers, electricians, carpet layers etc. They’re the ones that give your house the ability to function as a living space. They’re the designers.

Sure you can get an interior designer to come in and give your place a swishy look, but that’s only later. The core is all the bits that go together to make the house. And it’s remarkably similar to a book. Without the elements in at the right point—and sometimes all together, it’s hard to get going. And head banging follows.

Which of course brings us to the third part—content

Remarkably the easiest part is content. Because for the most part, we know what to say. You know this to be true, because once your house is built, you kinda know how to fill it up with stuff. Yes, there’s always the chance of clutter, but if you followed the first part—structure, you should be good.

The reason why we struggle, is because we put the entire truckload of information on paper. Clients take one look at it, perhaps a second look and then never finish. And that’s bad for them, but mainly bad for you. Because now you have to go out and find new clients instead of clients coming back over and over again.

But that still leaves the question: What do you put in the content?

The very core of content is not that hard. You have to approach it like a five year old approaches a skunk. They’re not afraid of the skunk. And they have questions. So what does the five year old ask?

-What is that?
-Where did it come from?
-Why are you so scared of it?
-Why are they so smelly?
-But can’t we have one as a pet if it’s not smelly?

These are the kind of questions you ask. It never leaves us, this core curiosity.

If you’re writing a book on pricing, and you are covering “how packaging affects pricing”, you have similar questions.

- What is packaging?
- Why does it matter?
- How do you use packaging to increase prices?
- What are the mistakes you can make with packaging?
- But what if you don’t want to package?

These are the core questions you have to answer. And remarkably, you could write the content without too much trouble, if you just had a friend or customer ask the questions. But where you struggle the most is in the structure and the design. And that’s what you need to work on.

Amateur writers sit down to write.

Professionals first sit down to plan.

——————————————–

Live US Workshop 2015: 4 Seats Left!

How to create knockout information products that instantly separate you from the competition (and enable you to charge higher prices)


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Announcing! Dartboard Pricing: How To Increase Prices (Without Losing Customers)

Website Series: How to create a trusting experience for your website visitor
Testimonial Secrets:
Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy (And Why They Don’t)
Sales Pages:
How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


5000bc: The place to get reliable answers to your complex business problems?
Black Belt Presentation: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
Membership : How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 



Two Critical Components For Getting Attention

Two Critical Components For Getting Attention

Let’s say you’re sitting in the audience, about to hear a speech on “Why Customers Buy”.

You’re expecting the presenter to introduce himself.
You’re expecting that presenter to say something about conversion and purchasing decisions.
You’re not 100% sure what to expect, but you’re not expecting what you’re seeing right now.

The speaker has grabbed a chair from the audience.

He’s saying something. Standing on the chair, sitting on it. And suddenly your brain can’t help but be riveted to what’s unfolding before you. And that’s because the speaker is pressing hard on your brain’s neurotransmitters. He’s getting your attention by doing something that’s so novel that you have no option, but to pay attention.

Attention: A combination of novelty and consequences!

To get a person’s attention—any person’s attention, you have a few minutes, perhaps even a few seconds. And if you break up attention into two distinct bits, you get two parts. Novelty. And consequences. The novelty comes first. It’s the part that holds your attention.

Suddenly, there’s this unusual thing unfolding in front of your eyes. And it’s not terribly unusual, but enough to get and keep your attention. The moment your brain is locked in, your curiosity ramps up.

And no matter whether you’re on a website, reading a book, or listening to a presentation, the same neurotransmitters kick in, starting of course with novelty. Remember the chair story? Well, that was novelty.

Instead of starting The Brain Audit presentation talking about conversion, I sit on a chair, stand up, sit, stand

And then after a few seconds of these antics, I ask the audience, “Who expected the chair to break?” None of the hands go up—obviously. Then I ask the question, “why didn’t the chair break?”

And then someone in the audience will invariably say, “It was built to take your weight”. Which, yes, is the right answer. The chair didn’t break because it’s built on science. It’s not supposed to break. And then we look at our marketing, and find that it breaks. We don’t know how or why  it breaks, because there’s no science”

You see what’s happened? We moved from novelty right into consequences!

Novelty is nice. Novelty is needed. It’s what gets your attention, but then it’s time to sustain that attention. And that’s when the consequences storm through the door. But for consequences to exist, a problem must exist in the first instance. So once you bring up the problem, you then (and only then) explain the consequences.

And when we go back to the chair example, we see how the problem seems to have shown up

“With marketing you don’t have the science of a chair. It doesn’t work every single time. And so you spend a bit of money on advertising or write out a cheque for some Facebook campaign. But the results are far from consistent.

You hit, but more often you miss. You spend money here, there and everywhere and you’re not even sure what’s going to work for you. It’s frustrating, even debilitating, not knowing when you don’t get consistency. And yet the brain works on consistency. When we send out a consistent message, we get consistent result.

The reason why there’s such a hit and miss syndrome is because we don’t quite understand how the brain works. So how does the brain work?

See how novelty and consequence make a great act?

But first you have to understand what makes great novelty. And novelty mostly comes from two areas: analogies or stories. The moment you understand how to tell dramatic stories, you can immediately create novelty.

The same applies to analogies. But like everything in life, you can tell stories in a great way, or make it utterly boring. The chair analogy stands out because it’s unusual.

If a presenter had to start with an analogy of “building your house on rocky vs. sandy ground”, for example, the audience would fall asleep, because they’re more than likely to have heard that analogy before. So your novelty has to be built around something that’s pretty every day in nature, yet different enough to get attention.

And once you get to consequences, there’s also scope to go off target

Most of us get so enamoured with the consequences of the problem, that we forget that we have to stay on a narrow track. Your audience is locked in because you’ve just told them they’re wasting money and they don’t know how to stop this crazy expenditure. At this point, it’s easy to go off track into a completely different set of consequences.

But you’ve got to stick with what happens next

What happens when you spend all that money? How does it impact your future decisions? How do you feel when things go wrong? These are all consequences of a SINGLE action. And staying on track is critical to keep that attention. If you get distracted and head into several consequences, you’ll quickly lose the audience.

Let’s take another example of attention and consequences

In a presentation on “pricing”, I will start the presentation with a video of New Zealand. There you are, waiting for the presenter to talk about pricing and he’s talking about “three month vacations”. But that’s the novelty. And it’s tied right back to why you struggle to take those vacations. The reason? Sure, it’s the prices you’ve been charging.

And then it’s time for the consequences of lower prices

How you have to work twice as hard to get the same results. How you get more tired, never having time to upgrade your skills. How those lack of skills cause clients to choose others with superior skills. And then you have to work so hard just to stay in place, that a vacation, let alone a three month vacation seems like a distant dream.

So how do you increase your prices? And how do you pull off this trick without losing customers?

Attention and consequences are powerful allies.

Used well they get and keep attention.

Nice, eh?


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