How to get a FREE 30-Page Excerpt of The Brain Audit (Without Even Needing To Fill A Form)

brainaudit_cartoon

If you’ve always wondered what The Brain Audit was all about.
Or if you’ve ever wondered what’s in this book that’s caused thousands of businesses to  ‘sell without selling‘, then here’s away to stop wondering.

Because you can get a chunky 30 page excerpt of The Brain Audit.
And it’s free. You’ll enjoy the cartoons. You’ll enjoy the way The Brain Audit holds your attention. And you’ll learn a lot–even in just 30 pages.

No catches. Not even a darned form to fill.
But let me not yada, yada. Here you go.
Free! The Brain Audit Excerpt.

Warm regards from Auckland
Sean


Can Walking Make You Smarter?

Can Walking Make You Smarter?
You know how folks are always talking about being a millionaire?

Well, there’s a guaranteed way to become a millionaire

It’s called walking. You have those two feet, and if you did 15,000 steps a day, you’d end up doing 5,475,000 steps a year (yes, that is indeed five million, four hundred and seventy five thousand).

But you know what? 15,000 steps a day is an awful number of steps to complete day in and day out.

Yet, let’s suppose you did just half that, averaging about 8,200 steps a day…

You’d still end up doing over 3 million steps a year. Or rather, if we don’t do that many a day, think of 3 million steps that you’re NOT doing. That’s 3 million this year, and 3 million next year, 3 million the year after that.

I have a friend, Chris

Chris used to pride himself on not exercising. He’d go to the extremes most of us wouldn’t—just to avoid exercise.

Crazy things like driving his car across the street. And today Chris has had two heart attacks, he also has diabetes and it’s so bad, he doesn’t have any feeling on the soles of his feet.

But forget about Chris for a while…

I had issues with my health too. We eat out a lot (yes, despite all that food you see me cooking all the time). And the doctor told me that my blood sugar was high; so was my cholesterol and yes I needed to make dietary changes.

Well, I didn’t. I continued to do exactly what I was doing earlier—and I went for a walk. I got myself a Fitbit (www.fitbit.com) and I became a “competitive” walker. I’d park far away from the store.

I’d be the errand boy around the house. Suddenly I was doing what my grandparents; my parents did.

My grandparents and parents saw a gym as a place where you went to become a muscle man

They ate what they liked, drank a lot and yes, they even smoked a lot. But they also walked. And walked. And walked. And that’s the silly kind of journey I’m on.

I started out in July 2012. But this year I decided to have a pre-ordained goal. I decided to walk 15,000 steps a day.

Done well, that would get me to 5,475,000 steps in a year. As you can tell, that’s a heck of a lot of walking.


That’s just January. As you can see, some days I get “sloppy”. But my goal is clear. I’m going to make it to 5 million steps this year. Without a goal, you get nowhere.

But it’s also a heck of a lot of learning

I listen to courses, podcasts and audio books on my way out. And I learn a language on my way back (right now it’s Italian, which by the way, is remarkably like Spanish and Portuguese).

I don’t try to remember all the stuff I’m hearing. I just treat the audio in my ear, like radio. I remember whatever I can, even it’s a measly bit. And bit by bit, I learn a lot.

Like everyone else on the planet, I have no time. So I make time by walking. My iPhone is always strapped to my side. It’s always loaded and ready to go.

If I’ve judged right, I’ll finish over 500 hours of learning just this year

When you consider that a two day workshop usually has just a little over 12 hours of content, that’s like doing 450, 2-day workshops in a single year. Mind-boggling, isn’t it?

The opposite of exercise, isn’t weight gain.
The opposite is decay.
Decay of the body.
Decay of the mind.

I’m on Fitbit. You can get “competitive” too. Join me and get those legs moving.

Let’s go. Let’s get rid of the body and mind decay.
Let’s all become “millionaires”.

P.S. I detest exercise. I like playing a game like badminton, for example. But exercise bores me. Still, decay is not an option.

P.P.S. Wondering what happened to the medical reports? Well, the doctor said I was doing great. But I hadn’t changed my diet at all. I just exercised. I’m not suggesting you do the same. Do whatever it takes to lose weight and gain brain power. And yes, start walking—AND—counting!


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How do you design a solid home page that helps customers find their way around, and do what you want them to do? Find out more…

 

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Live US Workshop 2015:  2 Seats Left!
How to create knockout information products that instantly separate you from the competition (and enable you to charge higher prices)


Top Selling Products Under $50


Announcing! Dartboard Pricing: How To Increase Prices (Without Losing Customers)

Website Series: How to create a trusting experience for your website visitor
Testimonial Secrets:
Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy (And Why They Don’t)
Sales Pages:
How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


5000bc: The place to get reliable answers to your complex business problems?
Black Belt Presentation: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
Membership : How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 



3 Guaranteed Ways To Get Writer’s Block

3 Guaranteed Ways To Get Writer's Block

 

Three factors cause writer’s block.

Underwork.
Overwork.
Lack of systematic planning.

But let’s talk about systematic planning, first

Let’s talk about boiling an egg, shall we? What would you do first? Just turn on the flame and then scramble to get the vessel, water and egg? Wouldn’t the flame be the very last thing you turn on when doing something as simple as boiling an egg? Yet, there we go into writer-land, sitting at our computer, and expecting the ingredients to show up from thin air!

And that’s where the system goes out of the window.
So what would a real system look like?

A real system would involve at least three steps.

Step 1: Generate ONE topic.
Step 2: Generate ONE sub-topic
Step 3: Get to ONE sub-sub-topic

Let’s start with Step 1 and generate ONE topic

When you sit down, you first need to have a topic. Most people confuse a topic with a headline. And a topic isn’t a headline at all. It’s a topic. e.g. Japan is a topic. It’s the broad, big picture kind of thingy that you can’t do anything with at all. The purpose of the topic is simply to give you direction—so you can head over to Step 2—the sub-topic, which is where at least part of the action begins.

So why does the sub-topic have so much relevance?

That’s easy to understand, isn’t it? The topic like “Japan” is too hard to handle. So you chop it down to some thing more manageable—like “the bullet train”. Now you have a much better point of focus. Your mind is off the geishas, tonkatsu and green tea ice-cream. Instead you’re focused on just the sub-topic of the “bullet train”.

And sometimes, that’s as far as you need to go—from topic to sub-topic.
Obviously this isn’t one of those happy days, so we delve deeper into Step 3 and sub-sub-topics.

The sub-sub-topic usually nails the deal

Your brain is focused on the “bullet train” and now you can write a pretty detailed account of the bullet train. Maybe you could take us on a journey that includes the history, the technology and the challenges encountered.

And as you’re writing, something weird happens

You suddenly find that the article is getting very bloated. You started to write about two-three paragraphs about the “challenges encountered”, but suddenly you seem to have dozens of points on “challenges”.

Well, don’t panic. We’re still on track (pardon the pun). You continue to put what you can in a couple of paragraphs and silently rejoice. You’ve now created not one, but two articles on the “bullet train”.

Aha, but no article has been written, right?

Not yet. You’ve spent all this time buzzing steadily ahead from topic to sub-topic. And then delving down to sub-sub-topics. And now you know exactly what you’re going to write about. You’ve let your thoughts simmer and not a word of the article has been written. Yet, putting together these elements is akin to get the egg, the water and vessel together. At this point, a simple outline will get the cooking process underway—and you can write.

So yes, systematic planning helps keep writer’s block away. But what about the other two issues? How do under work and over work play their part?

Underwork is when you decide to do nothing

Any skill requires you to get to a level of fluency. And to get to fluency, you have to write every day—at least for a while. But often we write a bit, then take a break. That day long break stretches to a week, maybe two weeks, and then hell freezes over. It takes an enormous amount of persistence to get moving. Yup, writer’s block has smacked you right in the face!

But overwork will do about the same

Most of us have forgotten how to take time off. So we keep working endlessly. And all this crazy work, work, work soon depletes our energy. Energy is a strange thing because you can have time but no energy. With no energy we slip right into resistance, procrastination and yup, hell freezes over a second time.

Luckily there is a way out of the trap

No matter how much of a soup you’re in, all you really have to do is go through the three-step process. Start simple. Just a topic. Add your sub-topic. Then, the sub-sub-topic. Now your brain is churning steadily ahead.

Writer’s Block has been defeated.

For today, at least.


Important Announcements


Dartboard Pricing: How To Increase Prices (Without Losing Customers)
1) Dartboard Pricing: How To Increase Prices—Without Losing Customers
(Prices go up tomorrow). Last day for special offer. Have a look and judge for yourself.

2) Live US Workshop 2015: 3 Seats Left!
How to create knockout information products that instantly separate you from the competition (and enable you to charge higher prices)


Top Selling Products Under $50


Announcing! Dartboard Pricing: How To Increase Prices (Without Losing Customers)

Website Series: How to create a trusting experience for your website visitor
Testimonial Secrets:
Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy (And Why They Don’t)
Sales Pages:
How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


5000bc: The place to get reliable answers to your complex business problems?
Black Belt Presentation: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
Membership : How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 



Why We Struggle To Write a Book: 3 Structural Reasons

Why We Struggle To Write a Book: 3 Structural Reasons

When you sit down to write a book, you wonder why the sound of hitting your head is so very loud.

The more you sit down, the harder it seems.
And yet, there’s a reason—three actually.

And the three are—tah dah!

1) Structure
2) Design
3) Content

Stage 1: Structure is where you design the “design”

Most of us have, at some point, played with Lego. When you attack a kid’s Lego set, you don’t need a plan. Bricks go over bricks, red over blue, green under yellow—and you get applause at the end of the day. Which is fair enough. You’re a kid playing and play should be free-wheeling.

But the moment you get to serious house-building and you pull out your Lego resumé, you’ve got trouble on your hands. And that’s because you need a blue print of sorts. You need a construction plan. Just sitting down and attacking the timber ain’t going to get that house up in a hurry.

Which is approximately how you write a book as well

Most of us have read books—sure, but haven’t been privy to the writing process. And the first part of the process is planning.

You need a framework to hang your information on. And the framework makes things accessible, and idiot-proof. The biggest reason we have DIY (do-it-yourself) disasters, is because someone with a hammer and blowtorch decides to write a book.

Invariably you get a book, but the core of it is shoddy. The material is extremely hard to consume.

But we’re not even jumping over to the reader

Like DIY without a blueprint, it’s just plain hard work.

The reason why so many tasks take so much time is because a plan makes the step-by-step process easier. You know where you’re going right—and more importantly where you’re going off on a tangent. And when we take this tangential trip, we end up spending a lot of time.

Time that could have saved, with a plan; a structure in place.

When you look back at the Renaissance, for instance, you see an incredible volume of creativity

Why were so many people creative at one point in time? The answer lay in the structure of apprenticeship.

The teacher had a plan, the apprentice followed the plan. And then once they were fluent, they went on to create their own marvellous pieces of art. Writing too, is a piece of art. And sure you can throw anything together and hope it sticks. But it’s better to have structure.

However, structure itself won’t work—and this takes us to design.

Stage 2: What’s design?

Design is indeed what it looks like, but it’s more about how it’s consumed. So when you read a book like The Brain Audit, for example, you find yourself sliding through it.

Now on the face of it, it’s a marketing book with some analogy about seven red bags on a conveyor belt. Doesn’t sound too racy, does it? And yet, the moment you start, it’s a slippery slide.

Chapter after chapter gets your attention…

You hardly feel like you’re reading a marketing book. You somehow feel motivated to keep going. And this is because of the design.

It’s designed to look good—yes it is—but it’s also designed to get you slip-sliding.

Do you notice the white spaces? The sub-head design? The cartoons, the summaries, the captions, the stories and analogies—they’re all designed to do a specific thing at a specific time.

Just like when you’re building a house, you get different elements working sequentially, but also all at once

You get the piles put in, then the house structure. Suddenly there’s an army of plumbers, electricians, carpet layers etc. They’re the ones that give your house the ability to function as a living space. They’re the designers.

Sure you can get an interior designer to come in and give your place a swishy look, but that’s only later. The core is all the bits that go together to make the house. And it’s remarkably similar to a book. Without the elements in at the right point—and sometimes all together, it’s hard to get going. And head banging follows.

Which of course brings us to the third part—content

Remarkably the easiest part is content. Because for the most part, we know what to say. You know this to be true, because once your house is built, you kinda know how to fill it up with stuff. Yes, there’s always the chance of clutter, but if you followed the first part—structure, you should be good.

The reason why we struggle, is because we put the entire truckload of information on paper. Clients take one look at it, perhaps a second look and then never finish. And that’s bad for them, but mainly bad for you. Because now you have to go out and find new clients instead of clients coming back over and over again.

But that still leaves the question: What do you put in the content?

The very core of content is not that hard. You have to approach it like a five year old approaches a skunk. They’re not afraid of the skunk. And they have questions. So what does the five year old ask?

-What is that?
-Where did it come from?
-Why are you so scared of it?
-Why are they so smelly?
-But can’t we have one as a pet if it’s not smelly?

These are the kind of questions you ask. It never leaves us, this core curiosity.

If you’re writing a book on pricing, and you are covering “how packaging affects pricing”, you have similar questions.

- What is packaging?
- Why does it matter?
- How do you use packaging to increase prices?
- What are the mistakes you can make with packaging?
- But what if you don’t want to package?

These are the core questions you have to answer. And remarkably, you could write the content without too much trouble, if you just had a friend or customer ask the questions. But where you struggle the most is in the structure and the design. And that’s what you need to work on.

Amateur writers sit down to write.

Professionals first sit down to plan.

——————————————–

Live US Workshop 2015: 4 Seats Left!

How to create knockout information products that instantly separate you from the competition (and enable you to charge higher prices)


Top Selling Products Under $50


Announcing! Dartboard Pricing: How To Increase Prices (Without Losing Customers)

Website Series: How to create a trusting experience for your website visitor
Testimonial Secrets:
Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

Brain Audit: Why Customers Buy (And Why They Don’t)
Sales Pages:
How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


5000bc: The place to get reliable answers to your complex business problems?
Black Belt Presentation: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
Membership : How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 



Two Critical Components For Getting Attention

Two Critical Components For Getting Attention

Let’s say you’re sitting in the audience, about to hear a speech on “Why Customers Buy”.

You’re expecting the presenter to introduce himself.
You’re expecting that presenter to say something about conversion and purchasing decisions.
You’re not 100% sure what to expect, but you’re not expecting what you’re seeing right now.

The speaker has grabbed a chair from the audience.

He’s saying something. Standing on the chair, sitting on it. And suddenly your brain can’t help but be riveted to what’s unfolding before you. And that’s because the speaker is pressing hard on your brain’s neurotransmitters. He’s getting your attention by doing something that’s so novel that you have no option, but to pay attention.

Attention: A combination of novelty and consequences!

To get a person’s attention—any person’s attention, you have a few minutes, perhaps even a few seconds. And if you break up attention into two distinct bits, you get two parts. Novelty. And consequences. The novelty comes first. It’s the part that holds your attention.

Suddenly, there’s this unusual thing unfolding in front of your eyes. And it’s not terribly unusual, but enough to get and keep your attention. The moment your brain is locked in, your curiosity ramps up.

And no matter whether you’re on a website, reading a book, or listening to a presentation, the same neurotransmitters kick in, starting of course with novelty. Remember the chair story? Well, that was novelty.

Instead of starting The Brain Audit presentation talking about conversion, I sit on a chair, stand up, sit, stand

And then after a few seconds of these antics, I ask the audience, “Who expected the chair to break?” None of the hands go up—obviously. Then I ask the question, “why didn’t the chair break?”

And then someone in the audience will invariably say, “It was built to take your weight”. Which, yes, is the right answer. The chair didn’t break because it’s built on science. It’s not supposed to break. And then we look at our marketing, and find that it breaks. We don’t know how or why  it breaks, because there’s no science”

You see what’s happened? We moved from novelty right into consequences!

Novelty is nice. Novelty is needed. It’s what gets your attention, but then it’s time to sustain that attention. And that’s when the consequences storm through the door. But for consequences to exist, a problem must exist in the first instance. So once you bring up the problem, you then (and only then) explain the consequences.

And when we go back to the chair example, we see how the problem seems to have shown up

“With marketing you don’t have the science of a chair. It doesn’t work every single time. And so you spend a bit of money on advertising or write out a cheque for some Facebook campaign. But the results are far from consistent.

You hit, but more often you miss. You spend money here, there and everywhere and you’re not even sure what’s going to work for you. It’s frustrating, even debilitating, not knowing when you don’t get consistency. And yet the brain works on consistency. When we send out a consistent message, we get consistent result.

The reason why there’s such a hit and miss syndrome is because we don’t quite understand how the brain works. So how does the brain work?

See how novelty and consequence make a great act?

But first you have to understand what makes great novelty. And novelty mostly comes from two areas: analogies or stories. The moment you understand how to tell dramatic stories, you can immediately create novelty.

The same applies to analogies. But like everything in life, you can tell stories in a great way, or make it utterly boring. The chair analogy stands out because it’s unusual.

If a presenter had to start with an analogy of “building your house on rocky vs. sandy ground”, for example, the audience would fall asleep, because they’re more than likely to have heard that analogy before. So your novelty has to be built around something that’s pretty every day in nature, yet different enough to get attention.

And once you get to consequences, there’s also scope to go off target

Most of us get so enamoured with the consequences of the problem, that we forget that we have to stay on a narrow track. Your audience is locked in because you’ve just told them they’re wasting money and they don’t know how to stop this crazy expenditure. At this point, it’s easy to go off track into a completely different set of consequences.

But you’ve got to stick with what happens next

What happens when you spend all that money? How does it impact your future decisions? How do you feel when things go wrong? These are all consequences of a SINGLE action. And staying on track is critical to keep that attention. If you get distracted and head into several consequences, you’ll quickly lose the audience.

Let’s take another example of attention and consequences

In a presentation on “pricing”, I will start the presentation with a video of New Zealand. There you are, waiting for the presenter to talk about pricing and he’s talking about “three month vacations”. But that’s the novelty. And it’s tied right back to why you struggle to take those vacations. The reason? Sure, it’s the prices you’ve been charging.

And then it’s time for the consequences of lower prices

How you have to work twice as hard to get the same results. How you get more tired, never having time to upgrade your skills. How those lack of skills cause clients to choose others with superior skills. And then you have to work so hard just to stay in place, that a vacation, let alone a three month vacation seems like a distant dream.

So how do you increase your prices? And how do you pull off this trick without losing customers?

Attention and consequences are powerful allies.

Used well they get and keep attention.

Nice, eh?


Product Offers: Links you should visit


Products Offers Psychotactics

The Brain Audit
Are you losing tons of potential business because you don’t know how the brain works?
Read how The Brain Audit can help you (The Brain Audit has over 978 testimonials).

Announcing! Dartboard Pricing: How To Increase Prices (Without Losing Customers)


 


Announcing! Dartboard Pricing: How To Increase Prices (Without Losing Customers)

Trust the chef:  Dartboard Pricing Offer

Dartboard?
As in darts and a dartboard?

Yes, exactly!
If you go to a bookstore and buy a dozen books on pricing, you will find pricing is some incredibly sophisticated system. You’ll run into fancy and complicated pricing models that rapidly put you to sleep.

So is pricing simple?
Sure it is. You don’t need a book to figure out pricing. A simple dart board and some prices on the board would solve your problem in a matter of minutes.

The price itself is of little consequence
What matters is all the stuff around the price. And in this three-part book series, you’ll understand:

- The Psychology of Pricing (What Causes Us To Buy)
- The Method of Raising Prices (And The Mistakes To Avoid)
- Creating and Managing Price Expectations

There’s no sales page. 
There’s just a “trust the chef” offer. You want to take it now, before the prices rise by 28%. And yes, it’s fully guaranteed—in case the chef’s meal is not to your liking.

No boring pricing models.
No ugh complication.
Just a simple, step-by-step system that walks you through exactly what you have to do.

Here’s the page. Judge for yourself.
http://www.psychotactics.com/products/trust-the-chef/



Regards for a rainy day in Auckland
Sean


How To “Finish Your E-Book”: Prices Going Up 20%

 

How To Finish Your E-Book

Writing a book isn’t a pain.
Well, most folks would disagree.

Because writing has, traditionally, been a pain.

But the pain comes from structure. The pain comes from knowing
too much. Then, when you sit down to write, all the thoughts from
the past start pushing through the same door.

Your brain can’t deal with such an invasion

And so it shuts down. You sit there, upset with yourself. You figure
you’re the one to blame. That you don’t have the talent to write.
And sure, we’ve all been there, but it’s not true.

It’s never been true.

That’s because you can write an e-mail

You can make a forum post.
You can do a lot of things that involve writing. But the book, it’s
much too big, vast, and confusing for you–the writer.

This workshop isn’t about writing

This workshop is about the structure that helps you to write.
It’s the grammar of the language that helps us write e-mails, forum
posts and pretty much everything we do today. Without that grammar
we’re lost.

If you really are tired of sitting on your hands, this is the
workshop for you It’s the “Info-Products Workshop” (but really,
it’s about completing that book). Having said that, you can go on to
complete other information products too, using the same structure.

And prices go up by 20%

On 28th March, 2015, it’s up, up and away.
Grab your seat right away at http://www.psychotactics.com/dc

Warm regards,
Sean
P.S. If you’d like the home study, e-mail us and we’ll give
you instructions, but ideally make it to the workshop. You
get a double benefit. You actually get to see how “education”
and “learning” should be done–instead of information-overload.

You also get to meet Elmo. :)


Why Bad Testimonials Attract Bad Clients (And How To Avoid It)

How To Attract The Customers You Want

Nothing bugs you more than a painful client.
A client who hassles you at every step of the way.
A client who won’t pay on time.
A client who takes up so much of your energy that you get drained.

I used to have clients like that
And then at some point I stopped getting bad clients.
Every single one of our clients were helpful, kind and extremely co-operative.
Work became a joy instead of a painful exercise.

And after a lot of digging, I found out the reason for the change
Amazingly it was the testimonials. My Web site was like a mirror. When I had the “right” testimonials and the right “tone” to the testimonials, and of course the right “structure”, I started getting amazing clients.

So what’s the right tone and right structure?
Can something as basic as a testimonial make such a massive difference to your sanity and your cash flow? And is it possible that instead of just getting another testimonial, you’ll actually get an insight into how the customer buys, and their rationale for choosing you?

If you’ve ever struggled to get consistently good clients (or detailed testimonials for that matter) then you’ll find that this knowledge is more than just common sense. It’s a bit of strategy you can’t do without.

Judge for yourself at:
http://www.psychotactics.com/testimonialsecrets

Sean
P.S. Here is what Allen Weber has to say about this product


“It solved the problem of getting meaningful testimonials, without
needing to ‘bribe anyone’ for it”.

I have been using testimonials in sales letters, and on websites for many years. And I have given testimonials for products I love. I thought I knew a lot about testimonials: From the sugary sweet ones that say nothing bad to the ones that use Sean’s six questions he writes about in this book–which are really critical to get good, well, constructed testimonials from clients and/or customers. What I found while reading this book…well, by page 26–PAGE 26 itself–I already had a full sheet of notes on how to improve testimonials.

And as I continued reading, I found so many MORE new great ideas for getting testimonials–whether written, on audio, on video–and how to use them effectively. I was shocked, even a bit amused at how little I knew.

Utilizing the easy to understand, easy to implement information in this book should bring in far greater revenue. And even better, it solves a problem for me of how to get real, meaningful testimonials, doing it legitimately–and without making anything up, or needing to “bribe anyone”.

The best thing of all: I’ve learned how to get these testimonials long before anyone has bought the product!

Allen Weber
Jacksonville, Florida, USA

Judge for yourself at:
http://www.psychotactics.com/testimonialsecrets


Why Online Learning Can Reduce Your Implementation Skills

online learning skills

Turn on the switch in your room.
Did the light turn on?

Well, if it wasn’t for Michael Faraday, we may have still been in darkness

And that’s because way back in 1831, Faraday invented electromagnetic induction. Right until that point, the whole idea of electricity was more of a curiosity than a reality. And one of the reasons why Faraday got to this particular moment in history, is because he left home. But not just home, but the amazing job he had as a bookbinder.

Today we don’t think twice about books

But back around the 1800s, books were expensive and hard to find. However, Faraday had the fabulous luck of getting a position as an apprentice of a bookbinder. And for the next seven years, he read every book he could get his hands on, concentrating mostly on his first love—science.

In a way, Faraday was a bit like us today

With the Internet we have access to thousands of courses, webinars, reports and books at incredibly cheap prices. And yet most of us find it hard to learn skills as quickly as we should. And often it’s not for want of application. Some of us may be easily distracted but others are dedicated enough.

I sure was dedicated

Four years ago, I decided to learn watercolours. My next step was to invade the library. I brought home every possible book on watercolours and pored through them like Faraday. Then, because I was still hungry, I bought physical books and supplemented them with e-books. And yes, several online courses too.

And I painted

I filled up a page a day, every day of the year for three and a half years (that’s over 1000 paintings, if you’re counting). And you know what? I learned a lot. But then I did one course in Spain and my watercolours took a dramatic turn for the better.

Faraday did the same—and his life changed dramatically

While he was no slouch in the reading department, Faraday longed for a “live workshop”. He went four times to see speaking engagements of  Humphry Davy, the most prominent chemist at the time.

And then in a stroke of good luck for Faraday, Humphry Davy was temporarily blinded during one of his experiments. Faraday was called in to help as an assistant. And that was his “live workshop”.

Online learning is amazing, but you can’t depend on online learning alone

In fact, since 2006, we at Psychotactics have had clients who’ve loved our Article Writing Course, Info-product Course, Cartooning Course etc. And there’s not a doubt in the world, that online learning is extremely valuable.

And yet, a live workshop is a completely different and needed experience.

And we’re not just talking about workshops just from the client’s point of view. My wife Renuka and I travel over 10,000 miles to conduct workshops, because there are things you can learn offline that you simply cannot learn online. You can try and try all you want, but the learning is different.

It’s not a question of “or”. It’s a question of “and”

Both the online and live workshops are what’s needed. And yet most of us won’t make the journey. Of course we have our reasons, but one of the biggest reason is that we can get most stuff online, so why bother paying for the hotels, the stay, when we can get the comfort of a workshop in our homes? I don’t know about you, but every time I’ve left home, I’m not just leaving home.

I’m leaving the hassles of home too

No garbage to put out, no dishes to wash, no cat to be fed, no this and no that. For two whole days while I travel, I can think and work on my business instead of in it. And while I’m at the workshop, I have no distractions—well, fewer distractions anyway.

But all workshops are not created equal

In fact it’s easier to confuse the terms “workshop” and “seminar”. In my experience, a seminar is inferior to a workshop. You may have one or many speakers, but they all have their own ideas and it’s rarely a cohesive plan.

A workshop on the other hand has to be cohesive as you actually have to learn and then work on something. So given a choice, I will always choose a workshop over a seminar.

The second mistake is when you have no information in advance

If you’re going to get your notes to the workshop three seconds before the speaker starts to speak, you know you’re going to miss a lot. We don’t learn much the first time we encounter anything.

Remember how easy it is to drive a car? Remember the first time you sat behind the wheel?

A workshop that doesn’t send out notes at least a month in advance, is inferior because it’s not allowing you to prepare. Even a cursory preparation helps you to absorb the facts, and then go through them a second or third time around. In a “real” workshop, you’ll have done the ground work, and are ready to learn and implement.

Most people struggle for no reason

They don’t understand that to really get the benefit of learning, you have to do both—learn like Faraday at the bookbinder and then to leave and go into the real world scenario of a “workshop”. And we’re just a product of our times.

We like stuff to be home-delivered. And you know what? That home-delivery is good, but only for so long. You then need to get outside your comfort zone, do some due diligence and find a workshop that will teach you skills. This in turn boosts your confidence and I’d go so far as to say, boost your income as well.

Faraday was born in a poor family

For him a book binder’s job was the most incredible gift ever.
Yet he pushed beyond his comfort zone. He took the risks he needed to take. And he put that learning into practice.

Look around you at those you consider successful

Look around and you’ll find one thing in common.
They all did their home-learning.
But all of them left their nest.

Turn on the switch in your mind.
Did the light turn on?

—————————————————-

Announcing! Live US Workshop—May 2015

How To

How to create knockout information products that instantly separate you from the competition, and enable you to charge higher prices.
For more details click here: Information Products Workshop


Do you sometimes wonder if planning books are written just for the ‘organised’ people?

Chaos Planning Psychotactics
Organised people already know how to plan. They don’t need information like this. Yet most planning books are written without considering chaos at all.

Learn how the ‘Chaos Planning System’ is a radical, yet perfectly intuitive way to plan. And learn how to get things done, and take long vacations as well.
Judge for yourself: Chaos Planning System.


NEW! The Brain Audit: Why Clients Buy And Why They Don’t (Available in Different Formats)


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
2) Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

3) Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
4) Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

5) Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
6) Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
7) Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) Online Membership Sites: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 

 


Six Courses Behind: Why I Refuse To Stagnate

beat stagnation

At any given point in time, I’m exactly like the next person.

I’m six courses behind.

Right now, I’m learning GREP (InDesign), Colour for cartoon scenes, Lighting and Shadow, Scrivener—and I just bought a new camera (the Fuji X100s). And yes, there are about 60 lessons of my Portuguese course that I still have to work through (I’ve completed 30). This means I’m a lot behind in my courses—at least six courses of about 18-20 hours each.

And yes, it frustrates me

I’d like to have finished the courses. I’d like to have mastered GREP and know all the buttons on that camera that looks like something my grandfather owned. And yes, I’m no newbie with Scrivener, but I’d love to finish that course, if only to find out what I’m missing.

And at this point in time, I remember. I have about six copies of Harvard Business Review to go through, and yes, at least seven books on my Kindle that I still have to read.

That’s when I look at my nieces

One is five years old. The other is ten. They have so much stuff to learn as well. Week after week they’re pummelled with maths, writing, spelling, reading, and it’s endless. Like every one of us they struggle, but they don’t think of the future like we do.

Even with an enormous amount of stuff coming up in the future, they’re taking it one day at a time. They don’t say things like “I haven’t finished my maths, so I won’t take on spelling”.

And we adults do just that

We believe in our silly, ideal world. A world where you start something and you finish it. Possibly even master it on the first sweep! We think we’re not going to spend on this course, if we haven’t finished that course.

We will not buy this book, if that book is not complete. Adults call themselves realists, but they live in a fantasy world where all the boxes are ticked.

No one is saying that you should be irrational

This is not a suggestion to go out and do seventeen courses, or buy twenty-three books, knowing that you haven’t finished any of the preceding ones. Yet, in this fast-moving world, you can’t afford to sit down and say: I’ve not completed this, so I won’t learn that. No, no, no, non, non, no! You want to be six courses behind, or five courses behind. Or even three! You want to be constantly learning, implementing and knowing that you’re going to be behind all the time, from now until forever.

That is the state of the human condition

Your to-do list is always in a state of “things to do”. We’re always behind, because if we were not behind, we’d be stagnant. And that’s precisely what I would feel if I had completed all my courses, read all the books on my list, learned all the languages I needed to learn. I’d be stagnating.

You have to dig your well before you’re thirsty

I bought myself a bunch of Moleskine books back in 2009. They’re expensive watercolour books, but they lay on the shelf for about two years and I never so much as opened the wrapping.

Then, one day in 2010, I suddenly decided to use them, slowly at first, but soon I got momentum. I started using up one book every couple of months (that’s 60 pages of illustrations). But my books were there on the shelves the moment I was just semi-keen to get started. So were my paints. And the same applies to the courses I buy, the stuff I do.

I’m always behind

Six courses behind.
Six magazines and seven books behind.
But you know what? I’m constantly striving to close the gap knowing I never will.

But it sure beats being stagnant, eh?
—————————————————-

Announcing! Live US Workshop—May 2015

How To “Actually” Finish Writing A Book

How To
Most of us would, at some point, want to write a book. It seem logical, doesn’t it? A book is a pretty cool achievement. It opens doors. It’s a marketing tool that boosts your credibility. It helps you to empower your clients–even expand your market.
So how do you write the book itself–without feeling frustrating? For more details–and to meet Elmo, go to: How To “Actually” Finish Writing A Book


Do you sometimes wonder if planning books are written just for the ‘organised’ people?

Chaos Planning Psychotactics
Organised people already know how to plan. They don’t need information like this. Yet most planning books are written without considering chaos at all.

Learn how the ‘Chaos Planning System’ is a radical, yet perfectly intuitive way to plan. And learn how to get things done, and take long vacations as well.
Judge for yourself: Chaos Planning System.


NEW! The Brain Audit: Why Clients Buy And Why They Don’t (Available in Different Formats)


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
2) Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

3) Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
4) Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

5) Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
6) Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
7) Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) Online Membership Sites: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website


 

 


Announcing: US Live Workshop 2015

Announcing: US Live Workshop 2015

How To “Actually” Finish Writing A Book

Most of us would, at some point, want to write a book.
It seem logical, doesn’t it?

A book is a pretty cool achievement.

It opens doors.
It’s a marketing tool that boosts your credibility.
It helps you to empower your clients–even expand your market.

What I found, instead, surprised me…

When I finished my book, I got a sense of order. I got clear on
what I wanted to say. I had a system in place, first for myself.
The book, it seemed, would open doors, boost credibility, empower
and expand. It even brought in really good clients and revenue.

But most of all, I had a system

My first book, “The Brain Audit”, was a mishmash of ideas, until I
actually wrote it down in a structured way. That structure then
enabled me to improve my own work. I wrote better
sales letters, better e-mails, and most of all I could spot the
gaps. Before I had a system in place, it was a bit of hit and miss.
I’d put in some stuff and leave out bits.

Then I’d wonder why things didn’t work out like they should.

But the moment I had the book complete, the system clicked in
place

Sure, I called my first book “The Brain Audit”, but in reality
every book turns out to be a form of audit. It’s a checklist
encapsulated in a whole bunch of pages. Pages that
need to make sense to yourself, first. Then the reader. Without
“The Brain Audit” we’d struggle in our own business a lot more than
we needed. The writing of the book itself–that was the most
frustrating, yet most rewarding thing I’d ever
done.

And yet, the frustration is a waste of time

The reason why we’re frustrated, is because of the belief that if
you have the knowledge, you’ll be able to put it together somehow.
That’s a bit like having the ingredients for a dish, and hoping
you’re going to be crowned the winner at “Masterchef”.

Putting together a book without a “recipe” is an exercise in madness
We all know this, because at some level we’ve all tried it. We may
not have gone into book-writing land, because we’ve been so busy
just trying to get an article off the  ground.

And yet, writing has a structure, a skeleton, a system

When you follow that system, you’re able to assemble the
information in a way that not only makes sense for you, but also
for your client.

Today’s world is cluttered with books that readers
never complete. And that’s because a powerful book is based
on the elements of “consumption”. Without understanding
consumption, a book is just a mass of endless content–just like a
squillion books out there.

Spinning is not an option

It’s pointless to struggle and spin endlessly when there’s already
a system in place. And a workshop is the answer, precisely because
you have to travel. You have to put off doing work for those three
days. You get to focus, instead of being distracted by all the
stuff that invades your day. For three days, you talk, breathe,
drink and eat the system.

Then you implement

This is not a chatter-blah-session. The notes are sent in advance.
You get ONE speaker, that’s me. And I speak for a third of the
time. Two thirds of the time, you get to actually do stuff. And
better still, you don’t even have the claustrophobia of the meeting
room.

Most of the outstanding stuff is done outside the room,
over drinks at dinner–and if there’s a pool, by the pool. Because
when you think about it, you don’t learn very well at a desk or
being chained to a seat, do you?

To actually finish a book you need structure

You need to understand consumption.
And that’s when you can put your own system together.
Yes, there’s credibility, empowerment, expansion and all the good
stuff. But most of all you have a system that sends a quiet tingle
of happiness down your spine.

That’s the real victory.

Yes, there’s an important condition…

Come join us, but be aware that you need to have read The Brain
Audit in advance. Yes, it’s a barrier. But it ensures that we have
clients that are truly interested in learning and improving their
business. You can buy and read The Brain Audit at any point before
the event, but we will not accept you if you have not read
The Brain Audit. There are no exceptions to this rule.

For more details–and to meet Elmo–go to:

http://www.psychotactics.com/dc

Regards

Sean D’Souza


Why It’s “Dangerous” To Sell Products/Services With Benefits Alone…

benefit selling products

You know Dasher and Dancer
And Prancer and Vixen,
Comet and Cupid
And Donner and Blitzen.
But do you recall…
The most famous reindeer of all?

Sure, we’re talking about Rudolph

And notice how they talk about the “red nose” as Rudolph’s “problem”. And how that enabled Santa to use Rudolph as a guide to his sleigh, because of that bright red nose.

But think about it for a second: was the nose always a solution? No it wasn’t, was it? It was a problem. Right before Santa figured out that the nose would stand out on a dark night, the nose was proving to be a real pain. It stood out; the other reindeer jeered.

And yet, without that problem standing out, Santa would never have spotted Rudolph.

The same concept applies to your marketing

You may believe that your product or service solves an obvious problem. And so you don’t bother to talk about the problem, preferring instead to slide right into the solution; the benefit. Yet, that bypassing of the problem and getting right to the solution causes customers to miss the point.

Let’s say you’re selling a product that allows you to send personalised cards to loved ones

Let’s just say you’re a brand new service, and the cards aren’t anything like the cards you see in the marketplace. Instead of being generic, you can actually put in your own words, and in your own handwriting.

You don’t have to lick the stamps or even mail the card—it’s all done for you. So where’s the problem? There is no problem, is there?

The client can clearly see the solution, can’t they?

Yes, they can. But let’s just change the scenario for a second. Let’s now assume that there’s not just a single card service in the market. Instead, there are 8000 other card services doing approximately the same thing.

Now your business doesn’t stand out with just the “solution”, does it? Now your business/product/service looks exactly like the next one. Just touting the “solution/benefit” isn’t helping to get customers to buy from you.

And this is why the “problem” is critical to get the customer’s attention

Our business may start out working in a vacuum. But soon enough competition creeps up and within next to no time it’s a full on onslaught of competitors. The only thing that separates you from your competition is the way you describe the “problem”. And in the book, “The Brain Audit”, the method of how to get to the problem is clearly explained.

You don’t just dream up the “problem”

Instead you use the concept of the “target profile”. You speak to a single customer—not an audience—a single customer. They then tell you what they see as the problem. You then put that problem up and centre on your sales page, your brochure, your presentation. And then others with the same problem relate to it instantly.

Let’s take an example, shall we?

Let’s say you’re buying a camera, shall we? The solution for a camera is pretty darn easy—all you’re doing is taking photos. So there you are with your budget for this fancy camera with a zoom lens and all the bells and whistles. You have dozens of Nikon, Canon, Leica etc staring at you in the face. Instead you pick on the Fujifilm x100s. So why did you pick on that one?

It takes amazing low light pictures, that’s why

The problem with taking pictures is that your best pictures are often at dawn and dusk—not in the bright, harsh glow of the day. You may also want to take pictures at parties, and weddings and all those special occasions. And now you reach for your fancy camera and guess what? You need a flash.

That clunky add-on flash that weighs a ton. And you need to bump up the ISO (yes, technical term) way up, so you end up with grainy pictures. Yet, if you look at the Fujifilm x100s, you don’t need that crummy flash. In many cases, you don’t even have to bump that ISO (yes, technical term again) very high. You get crisp, yummy pictures in incredibly poor light.

Fuji x100

The Fuji x100s—my favourite camera.

I made you feel like buying a camera, didn’t I?

You had no intention of buying a camera, let alone the slightly expensive Fujifilm x100s. And yet, the description of the problem first—yes, long before the solution, made you feel like your next camera needs to somehow be the Fujifilm x100s. You noticed the solution only after the problem was brought out in great detail.

Too many of us expect clients to work out the problem

We think clients are smart—and yes they are. But they’re also busy; also inundated with far too many offers; far too many options to choose from. So when someone like you comes along, brings up the problem, then describes the problem, you are now creating that hook that a client will latch on to.

But this “problem” isn’t just a marketing issue alone

It’s a biological issue as well. When we deal with “solutions/benefits” our heart rate may go up, but only marginally. Think of a cup of coffee for a second. That warm cup of amazing coffee calling out your name.

And your heart rate goes up, doesn’t it? Now think of reaching the cafe and finding they’ve run out of coffee. Instantly your heart rate goes up. There is no cafe, no coffee, and no one has run out of anything—this is just a theoretical exercise, but your heart rate went up nonetheless.

This is the power of the problem

If you depend on the solution alone, you’re making a pretty big mistake. You’re allowing your clients to not feel this increase in heart rate. You’re assuming they will choose you instead. And yet, Santa didn’t choose Prancer. Or Blitzen. Not even Dasher or Vixen.

He chose the reindeer that had the “problem”. But he had to work it out. And you can bet that your busy client has no time to “work it out”. If you don’t do the work for them by highlighting the problem, they may just end up buying the product/service from the competition.

Your product or service can’t be just any ol’ reindeer

It has to stand out. And the best way to stand out is to get to a “target profile”, speak to that person, and get that person to give you the “problem” they’re facing—and yes, how you can solve that problem for them. You then take that information and put it on your product, your sales page, your marketing material. And that will make you stand out from the other “reindeer”.

Be Rudolph. Be the Fujifilm x100s. Stand out with the “problem”.
It’s the best way to get—and keep—the attention of the client.

Announcing! How To “Actually” Finish Writing A Book
Live Workshops 2015
April 2015: New Zealand
May 2015: USA


Do you sometimes wonder if planning books are written just for the ‘organised’ people?

 Chaos Planning Psychotactics
Organised people already know how to plan. They don’t need information like this. Yet most planning books are written without considering chaos at all.

Learn how the ‘Chaos Planning System’ is a radical, yet perfectly intuitive way to plan). And learn how to get things done, and take long vacations as well.
Judge for yourself: Chaos Planning System.

 


NEW! The Brain Audit: Why Clients Buy And Why They Don’t (Available in Different Formats)


Top Selling Products Under $50


1) Testimonial Secrets: Powerful Techniques to Get Better Clients-And Sales
2) Story Telling Series: How to suck your audience right in, in a matter of seconds

3) Sales Pages: How To Write Benefits and Bullets That Speed Up Sales
4) Article Writing: How To Speed Up Article Writing With Simple Outlines

5) Visual Basics: How Visuals Help Increase Sales Conversion On Your Website
6) Design Clarity: How to put sanity into your design with some really simple tweaks
7) Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done


1) Black Belt Presentation Series: How to completely control the room—without turning anyone off?
2) Online Membership Sites: How To Build A Powerful, Community-Driven Membership Website